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Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) Studies

Case Control, Cohort, and Other Studies

E. coli O157:H7 Case-Control Study, 1997

In 1997, FoodNet conducted a case-control study to determine risk factors for E. coli O157:H7 infection. The study found that visiting a farm, living on or visiting a farm that had cattle, eating pink hamburger (either at home or away from home), eating at a table-service restaurant, and obtaining beef through a private slaughter arrangement were the principal risk factors.

An electronic copy of the questionnaire and protocol is not currently available. Please use the contact information to the right to request a copy.

Reference:

Kassenborg HD, Hedberg CW, Hoekstra M, Evans MC, Chin AE, Marcus R, Vugia DJ, Smith K, Ahuja SD, Slutsker L, Griffin PM. Farm visits and undercooked hamburgers as major risk factors for sporadic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection: data from a case-control study in 5 FoodNet sites. Clin Infect Dis.2004;38(Suppl 3):S271-278.

E. coli O157:H7 Case-Control Study, 2000

In 2000, FoodNet conducted a second E. coli O157 case-control study. This study included subtyping of isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Infection was associated with eating pink hamburgers, drinking untreated surface water, and living on or visiting a cattle farm. Eating fruits and vegetables protected against infection.

An electronic copy of the questionnaire and protocol is not currently available. Please use the contact information to the right to request a copy.

Reference:

Voetsch, AC, Kennedy MH, Keene WE, et al. Risk factors for sporadic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 infections in FoodNet Sites, 1999–2000. Epidemiol Infect.2007;135(6):993–1000.

E. coli O157:H7 Cohort Study, 2006

In 2006, FoodNet began a 4-year cohort study among persons diagnosed with E. coli O157:H7 infection to describe antibiotic exposure and the risk of developing hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Subject enrollment and data collection is complete; data analyses are ongoing.

Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157 (STEC) Genomics Study

Persons enrolled in the E. coli O157:H7 cohort study (above) were also offered enrollment in a genomics study of genetic factors related to development of HUS. Enrollment is ongoing.

 
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