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Figures—2012 Preliminary Data

FoodNet uses a main-effects, log-linear Poisson regression (negative binomial) model to estimate changes in the incidence of infection.  The model adjusts for the increase in the number of FoodNet sites since 1996 and for variation in the incidence of infections among sites.  The average annual incidence for 1) 1996–1998 (1997–1998 for Cryptosporidium), the first years of surveillance, and 2) a more recent 3-year period (2006–2008) are used for comparisons.  The model is used to calculate the estimated change in incidence (relative rate) between 2012 and the comparison periods, with 95% confidence intervals (CI).  In the figures that report percent change, the percent change for the current year is calculated by comparison with the appropriate comparison period and graphed along with the 95% confidence interval.  In the figures that report relative rate, the relative rate for each year is graphed.  Trends in STEC non-O157 and Cyclospora infection were not evaluated because of sparse data.

FoodNet also uses the negative binomial model to measure overall trends in incidence.  In this model, data for Campylobacter, Listeria, Salmonella, STEC O157, Vibrio, and Yersinia, the bacterial pathogens for which >50% of illnesses are estimated to be transmitted by food, are combined, weighting them by incidence of infection for each pathogen.

Figure 1. Percent change in incidence* of laboratory-confirmed bacterial and parasitic infections in 2012 compared with average annual incidence during 1996–1998, by pathogen, FoodNet

Figure 1.  Percent change in incidence of laboratory-confirmed bacterial and parasitic infections in 2011 compared with average annual incidence during 1996–1998, by pathogen, FoodNet

*The estimates and confidence intervals presented indicate the relative change in the incidence of that pathogen compared with 1996–1998. The actual incidences of these infections cannot be determined from the graph.
Data are preliminary
§No significant change = 95% confidence interval is both above and below the no change line; significant increase = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are above the no change line; significant decrease = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are below the no change line
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

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Figure 2. Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed infections with Campylobacter, STEC* O157, Listeria, Salmonella, and Vibrio compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2012

Figure 2.  Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed infections with Campylobacter, STEC O157, Listeria, Salmonella, and Vibrio compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2011

*Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli
The position of each line indicates the relative change in the incidence of that pathogen compared with 1996–1998. The actual incidences of these infections cannot be determined from this graph. Data for 2012 are preliminary.

Data for Figure 2

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Figure 3. Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed infections with Shigella, Yersinia, and Cryptosporidium compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2012*

Figure 3.  Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed infections with Shigella, Yersinia, and Cryptosporidium compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2011

*The position of each line indicates the relative change in the incidence of that pathogen compared with 1996–1998. The actual incidences of these infections cannot be determined from this graph. Data for 2012 are preliminary.

Data for Figure 3

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Figure 4. Percent change in incidence* of laboratory-confirmed bacterial and parasitic infections in 2012 compared with average annual incidence during 2006–2008, by pathogen, FoodNet

Figure 4.  Percent change in incidence of laboratory-confirmed bacterial and parasitic infections in 2011 compared with average annual incidence during 2006–2008, by pathogen, FoodNet

*The estimates and confidence intervals presented indicate the relative change in the incidence of that pathogen compared with 2006–2008.  The actual incidences of these infections cannot be determined from the graph.
Data are preliminary
§No significant change = 95% confidence interval is both above and below the no change line; significant increase = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are above the no change line; significant decrease = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are below the no change line
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

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Figure 5.  Percent change in incidence* of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2012 compared with average annual incidence during 1996–1998, by serotype, FoodNet

Figure 5. Percent change in incidence of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2011 compared with average annual incidence during 1996–1998, by serotype, FoodNet

*The estimates and confidence intervals presented indicate the relative change in the incidence of that serotype compared with 1996–1998.  The actual incidences of these infections cannot be determined from the graph.
Data are preliminary.  Percent change was not evaluated for serotypes Javiana, I 4,[5],12:i:-, and Bareilly.
§No significant change = 95% confidence interval is both above and below the no change line; significant increase = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are above the no change line; significant decrease = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are below the no change line

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Figure 6. Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2012* compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2012

Figure 6. Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2011 compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2011

*Data for 2012 are preliminary.  Salmonella serotypes included are: Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Newport, and Muenchen.  Changes over time for serotypes Javiana, I 4,[5],12:i:-, and Bareilly were not evaluated.
The position of each line indicates the relative change in the incidence of that serotype compared with 1996–1998.  The actual incidences of  these infections cannot be determined from this graph. 

Data for Figure 6

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Figure 7. Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2012* compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2012

Figure 7. Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2011 compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2011

*Data for 2012 are preliminary.  Salmonella serotypes included are: Montevideo, Heidelberg, and Saintpaul.  Changes over time for serotypes Javiana, I 4,[5],12:i:-, and Bareilly were not evaluated.
The position of each line indicates the relative change in the incidence of that serotype compared with 1996–1998.  The actual incidences of these infections cannot be determined from this graph. 

Data for Figure 7

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Figure 8.  Percent change in incidence* of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2012 compared with average annual incidence during 2006–2008, by serotype, FoodNet

Figure 8.  Percent change in incidence of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections with the top Salmonella serotypes in 2011 compared with average annual incidence during 2006–2008, by serotype, FoodNet

*The estimates and confidence intervals presented indicate the relative change in the incidence of that serotype compared with 2006–2008.  The actual incidences of these infections cannot be determined from the graph.
Data are preliminary
§No significant change = 95% confidence interval is both above and below the no change line; significant increase = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are above the no change line; significant decrease = estimate and entire 95% confidence interval are below the no change line

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Figure 9.  Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed infections with Campylobacter, STEC* O157, Listeria, Salmonella, Vibrio, and Yersinia, and overall measure of change, compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2012

Figure 9.  Relative rates of laboratory-confirmed infections with Campylobacter, STEC O157, Listeria, Salmonella, Vibrio, and Yersinia, and overall measure of change, compared with 1996–1998 rates, by year, FoodNet 1996–2011

*Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli
The position of each line indicates the relative change in the incidence of that pathogen compared with 1996–1998.  The actual incidences of these infections cannot be  determined from this graph. Data for 2012 are preliminary.
§The measure of overall trends in incidence combines data for Campylobacter, Listeria, Salmonella, STEC O157, Vibrio, and Yersinia, the six key bacterial pathogens for which >50% of illnesses are estimated to be transmitted by food.  The model weights by incidence of infection for each pathogen.

Data for Figure 9

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