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State Statistics

State-Specific 2013 BRFSS Prevalence Estimates

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the best source for state-specific arthritis prevalence estimates. BRFSS is a state-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized, civilian U.S. population aged ≥ 18 years. The survey is administered in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands. Since 1996, selected states have been collecting information on arthritis through BRFSS.

Starting with the 2003 BRFSS and continuing in odd-numbered years, all states collected information on arthritis. Different questions were used to collect data between 1996– 2001 and from 2002 to present. In 2002, the case definition of arthritis changed as well. Beginning in 2002 we have focused on doctor-diagnosed arthritis only. Additional survey changes occurred starting in 2011.The 2011 BRFSS data reflects a change in weighting methodology (raking) and the addition of cell phone only respondents. For these reasons, it is not valid to look at trends that cross from 2001 into 2002 or from 2010 into 2011 and later. Also, starting in 2012, only the arthritis case definition is now collected annually.

Thus, 2011 is the new baseline for trending data, and prior years should not be incorporated in any trend analysis using 2011 data to present. Read more about the BRFSS arthritis-specific questions and the arthritis case definitions.

View state-specific arthritis data from the 2011 and 2013 BRFSS on our state data tables page

 

image map of state arthritis programs with funding: OR, CA, MT, KS, MO, KY, SC, MI, PA, NY, RI, PR Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentuky Louisiana Maine Maryland Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Vermont Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming


 

Alabama
Alaska
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California
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Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

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Arthritis Prevalence Estimates by State

State-level Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013 prevalence estimates found that arthritis is reported by at least 1 in 6 adults in every state. Nine states were in the lowest prevalence group. In the top 14 states with the highest prevalence, arthritis affects up to 1 in 4 adults.

Arthritis is very common and affects at least 1 in 6 adults in every state. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013. See text description below

Text description is available.

Data source: BRFSS 2013; CDC unpublished data.

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Arthritis Prevalence Estimates in Women and Men by State

Age-adjusted State-level Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013 prevalence estimates by sex found women had a higher prevalence of arthritis than men in every state. When examined by the same prevalence cutoff points (17–21%; 22–22%; 23-24%; and 25–33%), there were only six states in which both women and men were in the highest prevalence group (Kentucky, West Virginia, Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi, and Alabama). For the most part, women were in the middle and high prevalence group, while men were in the lowest prevalence group for all but four states. In the majority of jurisdictions (34 states), at least 1 out of every 4 women report arthritis.

Arthritis is very common in every state, and more women have arthritis compared with men. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013. See text description below.
 Text description is available.

Data Source: BRFSS 2013; CDC unpublished data.
 

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Prevalence of Arthritis-Attributable Work Limitation

In all states, working-age (ages 18-64) U.S. adults face work limitations they attribute to arthritis. The prevalence of arthritis- attributable work limitation varies by state but is generally high, affecting from 4.2% to 11.6% of all working-age adults. A state with a population prevalence of arthritis-attributable work limitation of 7% could be expressed as approximately 1 out of every 14 working-age adults in the state report doctor-diagnosed arthritis and say that it limits them in their work.

Arthritis-Attributable work limitations affect at least 1 in 25 working-age adults in every state. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013.
[Text description is available]

Data Source: BRFSS 2013; CDC unpublished data.
 

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Proportion of Arthritis-Attributable Work Limitation

Arthritis-attributable work limitation is very common among working-age (ages 18-64) US adults with arthritis. In states with the lowest prevalence of arthritis-attributable work limitations, it is still reported by greater than 1 of every 4 working-age adults with arthritis (25%). In states with the highest prevalence of arthritis-attributable work limitation, that ratio jumps to approximately 1 of every 2 working- age adults with arthritis.

Arthritis-Attributable work limitations affect at least 1 in 25 working-age adults in every state. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013.
Text description is available.

Data Source: BRFSS 2013; CDC unpublished data.
 

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Arthritis-Attributable Activity Limitations

The prevalence of adults with arthritis-attributable activity limitation ranges from 6.4% to 17.5%. These high rates of arthritis- attributable activity limitation are projected to increase with the aging of the population, requiring increased intervention measures to reduce this impact. Arthritis-attributable activity limitation can be prevented or reduced in many people. In fact, both aerobic and strengthening exercises can improve physical function and self-reported arthritis disability. Self-management education classes can also increase confidence in one’s ability to manage arthritis.

Arthritis-Attributable work limitations affect at least 1 in 25 working-age adults in every state. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013.
Text description is available.

Data Source: BRFSS 2013;CDC unpublished data.
 

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Proportion of Arthritis-Attributable Activity Limitations

The proportion of adults with arthritis who have arthritis-attributable activity limitations is substantial. In every state at least 1 in 3 adults with arthritis reports arthritis-attributable activity limitations. In some states, more than 1 in 2 adults reports arthritis- attributable activity limitations.

Arthritis-Attributable work limitations affect at least 1 in 25 working-age adults in every state. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013.
 

Text description is available.

Data Source: BRFSS 2013 ;CDC unpublished data.
 

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Proportion of Arthritis- Attributable Social Participation Restriction

Arthritis-attributable social participation restriction is defined here as an answer of “a lot” to a question asking how much arthritis has interfered with “normal social activities, such as going shopping, to the movies, or to religious or social gatherings.” The proportion of adults with arthritis-attributable social participation restriction ranges from about one in eight to one in three adults across states, indicating that it is a substantial problem caused by arthritis.

Map of the United States, showing the proportion of arthritis-attributable social participation restriction among adults with arthritis by state
 Text description is available.

Data Source: BRFSS 2013; CDC unpublished data.
 

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Proportion of Arthritis-Attributable Severe Joint Pain

Pain is a common symptom of arthritis. Arthritis-attributable severe joint pain is reported by at least 1 in 6 adults with arthritis in every state. In states with the highest prevalence of arthritis-attributable severe joint pain, it is more common than every 1 in 3 adults with arthritis.

Arthritis-Attributable severe joint pain affects at least 1 in 5 adults with arthritis in every state. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013.
 

Text description is available.

Data Source: BRFSS 2013; CDC unpublished data.

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State-Specific Prevalence of Falls and Fall Injuries Among Adults with and Without Arthritis, 2012 (unadjusted)

This table presents for each state/territory the crude (unadjusted) prevalence estimates of having 1 fall, ≥ 2 falls, and fall injuries in the past 12 months among adults aged 45 years and older with and without arthritis. Medians and ranges for all states and the District of Columbia were determined for all outcomes. All analyses used sampling weights to account for the complex sample design, nonresponse, noncoverage, and cellphone-only households.  It is the table referenced in a footnote of the May 2, 2014, MMWR titled “State-specific prevalence of falls and fall injuries among adults aged 45 years and older with and without arthritis--- United States, 2012.”

Barbour KE, Helmick CG, Luo Y, Theis KA, Murphy LB, Hootman JM, et. al. State-specific prevalence of falls and fall injuries among adults aged 45 years and older with and without arthritis--- United States, 2012. MMWR. 2014;63(17):379-383 html

Data Source: BRFSS 2012

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