Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home
Share
Compartir

Cost Statistics

National and state cost estimates

  • The total costs attributable to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions (AORC) in the United States in 2003 was approximately $128 billion. This equaled 1.2% of the 2003 U.S. gross domestic product.
    • $80.8 billion were direct costs (i.e., medical expenditures)
    • $47.0 billion were indirect costs (i.e., lost earnings)
  • Total costs attributable to AORC, by state, ranged from $226 million in the District of Columbia to $12.1 billion in California.
  • National medical costs attributable to AORC grew by 24% between 1997 and 2003. This rise in medical costs resulted from an increase in the number of people with AORC.
  • In 2003, costs attributable to AORC represented between 0.3 to 2.6% of each state’s GDP. For example: in 2003, the costs attributable to AORC in West Virginia were $1.2 billion and this represented 2.6% of West Virginia’s GDP.

  • [Note: CDC is currently updating national cost estimates for AORC to 2008. The CDC Arthritis program is also a member of the CDC Chronic Disease Cost Calculator working group which is developing state-level cost estimates. AORC will be among the conditions included in the next release of the calculator.

Study reports on arthritis costs:

National and state direct and indirect costs are presented in the January 12, 2007 MMWR entitled: National and State Medical Expenditures and Lost Earnings Attributable to Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Conditions — United States, 2003.

A detailed report on the national cost study, including the study methods and comparisons of 1997 and 2003 costs, was published in:

Yelin E, Murphy L, Cisternas M, Foreman A, Pasta D, Helmick C. Medical Care Expenditures and Earnings Losses Among Persons with Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Conditions in 2003, and Comparisons to 1997. Arthritis and Rheumatism 2007;56(5):1397-1407.

Top of Page

State-Specific Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

Map showing state specific gross domestic product

Yelin E, Cisternas M, Foreman A, Pasta D, Murphy L, Helmick C. National and state medical expenditures and lost earnings attributable to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions — United States, 2003. MMWR 2007;56(1):4–7. html pdf [306K]


The table below shows the total costs* (in millions of dollars) attributable to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions for each state in 2003.

Total Costs* (in millions) attributable to Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Conditions, By State, United States, 2003

$225 million to $574 million

$650 million to $1.6 billion

$1.9 billion to $2.9 billion

$3.2 billion to $12.1 billion

District of Columbia226Nebraska757Colorado1,920Indiana3,181
Wyoming243New Mexico770Louisiana2,036Tennessee3,271
Alaska275Utah820South Carolina2,133Virginia3,466
North Dakota285Nevada1,022Minnesota2,172New Jersey3,544
Vermont290Kansas1,106Arizona2,343Georgia3,911
South Dakota351West Virginia1,188Kentucky2,426North Carolina4,112
Delaware363Iowa1,250Wisconsin2,445Michigan5,557
Hawaii375Arkansas1,441Maryland2,479Ohio5,745
Montana396Connecticut1,443Alabama2,597Pennsylvania6,578
Rhode Island511Mississippi1,495Illinois2,670Florida7,624
Idaho564Oregon1,609Massachusetts2,734Texas8,706
New Hampshire574Oklahoma1,628Washington2,787New York8,726
Maine648Missouri2,874California12,137

* Total costs = medical expenditures + lost earnings

Yelin E, Cisternas M, Foreman A, Pasta D, Murphy L, Helmick C. National and state medical expenditures and lost earnings attributable to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions — United States, 2003. MMWR 2007;56(1):4–7. html pdf [306K]

Top of Page

National Medical Expenditures among People with Arthritis, 1997 to 2005

From 1997 to 2005, total national expenditures among all US adults with arthritis increased from by 100 billion dollars. Medical expenditures were $252.0 billion in 1997 and $353.0 billion in 2005. (Cisternas et al 2009)

Why did total national medical expenditures among all adults with arthritis increase from 1997 to 2005?

  • The rise in medical expenditures in this time period is attributable to two distinct factors:
    1. The number of people with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions increased by 22%
    2. Medical expenditures for each person with arthritis increased by 15%

Total national medical expenditures among US adults with arthritis, 1997 to 2005

Description of graph in text below

Data source: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 1997-2005

Expenditures for each individual are the sum of the following: inpatient, outpatient, office visit, home health, emergency, prescription medications, and other.


The graph above shows that ––

  • From 1995 to 2005, the total national medical expenditures among adults with arthritis only remained stable.
  • However, total medical expenditures rose by 27% among people who had arthritis and one or more co-occurring chronic conditions.
    • This increase in expenditures resulted from a rise in number of people with arthritis who also have co-occurring chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.
    • In 1997, 36.8 million people with arthritis had co-occurring chronic conditions and by 2005, this had risen to 44.9 million people.

Cisternas MG, Murphy LB, Yelin EH, Foreman AJ, Pasta DJ, Helmick CG. Trends in Medical Care Expenditures of US Adults with Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Conditions 1997 to 2005 J Rheumatol 2009;36(11):2531-2538. abstract

Top of Page

 
 

Contact Us:
  • Arthritis Program
    Mailstop F-78
    4770 Buford Hwy NE
    Atlanta, GA 30341-3724
  • Phone: 770.488.5114
    Fax: 770.488.5964
  • Contact CDC-Info
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC-INFO