Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

2-Ethoxyethyl acetate

May 1994
Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Concentrations (IDLH)

CAS number: 111–15–9

NIOSH REL: 0.5 ppm (2.7 mg/m3) TWA [skin]

Current OSHA PEL: 100 ppm (540 mg/m3) TWA [skin]

1989 OSHA PEL: Same as current PEL

1993-1994 ACGIH TLV: 5 ppm (27 mg/m3) TWA [skin]

Description of Substance: Colorless liquid with a mild odor.

LEL:. . 1.7% (10% LEL, 1,700 ppm)

Original (SCP) IDLH: 2,500 ppm

Basis for original (SCP) IDLH: Patty [1963] reported that guinea pigs survived a 1-hour exposure to an atmosphere essentially saturated with vapor (estimated to be less than 4,000 ppm) [Lehmann and Flury 1943]. Because the data concerning the concentration is not very specific, the IDLH is based on the concentration of 2-ethoxyethylacetate in saturated air at 20 C (i.e., 2,600 ppm).

Short-term exposure guidelines: None developed

ACUTE TOXICITY DATA

Lethal concentration data:

Species Reference LC50(ppm) LCLo(ppm) Time Adjusted 0.5-hrLC (CF) Derivedvalue
RatRat

Rabbit

Pozzani et al. 1959Smyth et al. 1941

Truhaut et al. 1979

2,204LC33: 1,500

>2,000

———-

—–

8 hr8 hr

4 hr

5,510 ppm (2.5)3,750 ppm (2.5)

>4,000 ppm (2.0)

551 ppm375 ppm

>400 ppm

 

Lethal dose data:

Species Reference Route LD50(mg/kg) LDLo(mg/kg) Adjusted LD Derived value
RabbitRat

G. pig

Eastman 1982Isin et al. 1988

Smyth et al. 1941

oraloral

oral

1,9502,700

1,910

———-

—–

2,486 ppm3,443 ppm

2,435 ppm

249 ppm344 ppm

243 ppm

 

Human data: None relevant for use in determining the revised IDLH.

Revised IDLH: 500 ppmBasis for revised IDLH: The revised IDLH for 2-ethoxyethyl acetate is 500 ppm based on acute inhalation toxicity data in animals [Pozzani et al. 1959; Smyth et al. 1941; Truhaut et al. 1979]. This may be a conservative value due to the lack of relevant inhalation acute toxicity data for workers.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Eastman Company [1982]. 8(e) submission to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Kingsport, TN: Tennessee Eastman Company, Status Report 8EHQ-0682-0450.

2. Isin OV, Plaksienko NF, et al. [1988]. Hygienic reglamentation of cellosolve content in water bodies. Gig Sanit 53(10):78-79 (in Russian).

3. Lehmann KB, Flury F, eds. [1943]. Toxicology and hygiene of industrial solvents. Translated by E. King and H.F. Smyth, Jr. Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins Company, p. 290.

4. Patty FA, ed. [1963]. Industrial hygiene and toxicology. 2nd rev. ed. Vol. II. Toxicology. New York, NY: Interscience Publishers, Inc., p. 1589.

5. Pozzani UC, Weil CS, Carpenter CP [1959]. The toxicological basis of threshold limit values: 5. The experimental inhalation of vapor mixtures by rats, with notes upon the relationship between single dose inhalation and single dose oral data. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 20:364-369.

6. Smyth HF Jr, Seaton J, Fischer L [1941]. The single dose toxicity of some glycols and derivatives. J Ind Hyg Toxicol 23:259-268.

7. Truhaut R, Dutertre-Catella H, Phu-Lich N, Huyen VN [1979]. Comparative toxicological study of ethylglycol acetate and butylglycol acetate. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 51:117-127.

TOP