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NIOSH Center for Workers' Compensation Studies (CWCS)

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Publications and Webinars

On this page you will find a list of publications produced as a result of projects which used workers' compensation data for prevention purposes. This list will be updated moving forward. Please submit any input to cwcs@cdc.gov.

CWCS Webinars

This regular series of free webinars is sponsored by the NIOSH Center for Workers’ Compensation to provide a platform for speakers to discuss a diverse range of topics related to using workers’ compensation data and systems to improve occupational safety and health. Webinars are generally held 12-2 Eastern Time and are open to the public. Webinars are hosted and recorded using the Adobe Connect platform and up to 500 attendees can participate live. Typical attendees include a wide range of state-based and private WC insurers, state WC bureaus, WC organizations, state health departments, academic researchers, and safety/health practitioners. Past webinars are summarized below and presentations are available upon request. Views expressed on the webinars represent solely those of the presenters, and not necessarily NIOSH. If you are interested in presenting your work during a CWCS webinar or would like a copy of a past webinar, please contact cwcs@cdc.gov.

4/14/16: Data Visualization: Making Workers' Comp Data Explorable for Prevention

In this webinar from the CWCS series, the CWCS’ own Matt Haviland discussed the use of visual analytics to make workers comp data more explorable and useable for developing prevention strategies. The presentation covered a basic introduction to the Center and to WC data in general.  It touched on the huge variety of data visualization tools, and important features and limitation to keep in mind. There was also a demonstration of how comp data could be explored, with some additional real world examples of existing, published data, being visualized for added value.

Speakers:
  • Thomas (Matt) Haviland, B.S., MSPH
    Data Analytics Fellow
    NIOSH, Center for Workers Compensation Studies

The recording is available online for viewing. For a copy of the presentation, please email cwcs@cdc.gov.

1/21/16: Prevention Strategies from Saskatchewan and British Columbia WC insurers

Speakers from the Saskatchewan WC Board and British Columbia’s WorkSafeBC discussed prevention strategies used by their provincial workers’ compensation insurers. The presentation covered how the Saskatchewan WC Board uses data to focus on important issues in their system and how they use the four pillars of their strategy: partnerships & leadership, targeting, education & training, and awareness to generate results. WorkSafeBC’s portion of the webinar described how it uses partnerships, direct employer consultation, outreach, education, funding, incentive programs, and the creation and provision of multi-media OH&S educational products and services to achieve its mission of injury prevention.

Speakers:
  • Phillip Germain, B.S.
    VP Prevention & Employer Services
    Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board
  • Dale Walker, J.D.
    Director, Industry & Labour Services
    WorkSafe BC

The recording is available online for viewing. For a copy of the presentation, please email cwcs@cdc.gov.

12/15/15: Putting Minnesota’s Work Comp Data to Work

Speakers from the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry described how MN WC claims data are used in a variety of ways to inform administration of the system and produce information of value to stakeholders and the general public. A detailed description of cost adjustments was covered, to explain how MN attempts to accurately measure the real costs of claims across time.

Speakers:
  • David Berry and Brian Zaidman
    Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry

The recording is available online for viewing. For a copy of the presentation, please email cwcs@cdc.gov.

10/29/15: Building the Foundation for Comparing States with a WC Claims Measures Survey

Speakers from the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC) presented information on an interstate collaboration through the IAIABC that is designed to lay the groundwork to build measures for comparing claims data across states.

Many states workers’ compensation administrative agencies collect data on WC claims that can be used for comparison with other states. But consistent definitions have frequently been a hurdle to comparability. Comparability across jurisdictions isn’t perfect, but Canadian provinces have demonstrated that working together with a patient approach can pay major dividends over time in the form of meaningful comparative data. In this webinar the speakers discussed a new survey through which the IAIABC is attempting to take a few steps toward the long-term goal of using state-collected claims data for comparison purposes.

Speakers:
  • Heather Lore, B.A., MBA
    Senior Manager, Membership and Communications
    International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC)
  • Mike Manley, B.A.
    Research Coordinator
    Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services

The recording is available online for viewing . For a copy of the presentation, please email cwcs@cdc.gov.

6/17/15: Prevention Strategies from State WC Insurance Funds in MN and CA

Speakers from the state workers’ compensation insurance funds in Minnesota and California discussed prevention strategies. Details of each presentation are given below.

  • Injury in our Schools- a Workers’ Compensation Perspective
    This presentation included an in-depth look at the causes and risk factors for injury to school district staff, with a special focus on the growing concern of student-perpetrated violence toward staff. The presentation also featured other current research as well as injury prevention strategies.
  • California State Compensation Insurance Fund (SCIF) Prevention Strategies
    This presentation included a review of the latest prevention approaches at SCIF and a planned analysis of the quantitative impact of loss prevention services on losses of insureds receiving loss control services.
Speakers:
  • Katherine Schofield, PhD, CSP, ARM, CHST, CSRM
    Risk Consultant
    Research Principal Investigator
    SFM-The Work Comp Experts
  • Craig Stroinski, MBA
    Large Strategic Business Operations
    SFM-The Work Comp Experts
  • Len Welsh
    Consultant to the President for Workplace Safety
    SCIF
  • Lauren Mayfield
    Safety and Health Services Program Manager
    SCIF

5/29/15: Disability Prevention Research: A Look to the Future

Jointly sponsored by the NIOSH Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies (CWCS)(http://wwwdev.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/workercomp/cwcs/default.html) and the NIOSH Office for Total Worker Health™ (TWH), this webinar featured the latest in disability prevention research and lessons learned from secondary prevention in Colorado and Washington. Topics included: trends in medical care provision, the links between quality of care and development of long-term disability, and the far-reaching impacts research in this area may have beyond workers’ compensation systems.

Speakers:
  • Kathryn Mueller, MD MPH,
    Medical Director, Colorado Division of Workers’ Compensation
    President, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • Gary Franklin, MD MPH
    Medical Director, Washington Labor and Industries
    Research Professor, University of Washington

The recording is available online for viewing . For a transcript of the live captions from the session, please email vqq3@cdc.gov

2/25/15: Ohio BWC Year of Safety

In this NIOSH Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies (CWCS) webinar, speakers discussed several ongoing and new prevention initiatives sponsored by the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation. The OHBWC has a long history of providing a number of prevention programs to prevent occupational injury/illness. For example, since 1999 OHBWC has offered a Safety Intervention Grant (SIG) program where employers are provided matching funds to implement engineering controls. Recently, OHBWC and CWCS found that the program significantly reduced affected employee injuries and costs and OHBWC greatly expanded the annual budget. This past year, the SIG program provided $15 million to 535 employers and OHBWC allocated an additional $45 million for fiscal years 2015-17. OHBWC also allocated another $4 million to fund four major initiatives designed to enhance the safety, health and wellness of Ohio’s workforce.

Speakers:
  • Abe Al-Tarawneh
  • Mike Lampl

12/4/14: The Value of EDI Claims Data & Dashboard Analytics for States

In this NIOSH Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies (CWCS) webinar, speakers discussed the value of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC) Electronic data interchange (EDI) claims data collected by many states today. In addition, examples were provided to illustrate how some states are leveraging those assets through technology (analytic dashboards) to gain deeper insight into the WC system.

Speakers:
  • Andre De La Fuente (Louisiana Workforce Commission)
  • Nicholas Floeck (ISO)

9/17/14: Worker Compensation Denominators

A main purpose of the recent NIOSH Workers’ Compensation Surveillance Funding Opportunity (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-14-227.html ) is to encourage states to combine WC data with state employment data to determine trends in rates of claims by specific industry group, and by cause of injury to focus prevention efforts.

This NIOSH Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies (CWCS) webinar described the preferred methods of:

  1. Joining state WC claim data (first reports of injury) and employment data (employee counts and NAICS industry from state unemployment compensation insurance system records) at the employer level using the federal employer identification number (FEIN)
  2. Adjusting employee counts with hours per employee data from sources such as the Current Population Survey (CPS), American Community Survey (ACS), the Bureau of Labor Statistics Labor, Productivity, and Costs program (LPC), and the Current Employment Survey (CES) to estimate full-time equivalents (FTE)
  3. Calculating rates of WC claims per FTE for more specific NAICS industries and employer size classes, and for industries with more regional variation
  4. Conducting sensitivity analyses of rate estimates based on differences in estimates from the different data sources above and choosing key rates to focus upon
Speakers:
  • Martha Jones (Vanderbilt University)
  • Tim Bushnell (NIOSH)
  • Steve Wurzelbacher (NIOSH)

7/23/14: Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention

Prescription drug abuse and overdoses are a major public health concern. The CDC reports that opioid overdose deaths in particular have quadrupled since 1999, with more than 16,600 deaths in 2010 alone. Many states have taken steps to control opioid use in their workers’ compensation systems by limiting opioid availability, educating health care providers on responsible opioid prescribing, and increasing awareness among injured workers. http://blogs.cdc.gov/niosh-science-blog/2014/05/14/opioid-abuse/

This webinar described prescription drug abuse prevention activities, emerging issues, and opportunities for future collaborations from the perspective of several organizations. Speakers included Noah Aleshire (National Center for Injury Prevention and Control), Gary Franklin (Washington Labor and Industries), Kathryn Mueller (American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine), and John Hanna (Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation).

5/21/14: Predictive Analytics Webinar

Predictive analytics is an area of data mining that deals with predicting trends and behavior patterns. Workers’ compensation data includes detailed claims-based information (injury cause, nature) and survey-based information (employer workplace hazards and controls) that can be used to predict and prevent future injuries/ illnesses.

This webinar described some recent predictive analytic approaches being used on workers’ compensation data to develop evidence-based prevention strategies. Speakers included Griffin Schultz (Predictive Solutions), Joel Schneider (CNA Insurance) and Steve Wurzelbacher (NIOSH).

4/9/14: Worker Compensation Causation Auto-Coding Part 2

This webinar continued the topic of auto-coding presented 1/16/2014. Although material covered in the previous webinar is not a pre-requisite for attending this webinar, attendees will find it useful to watch the recording of the previous webinar beforehand. Speakers included Alexander Measure (BLS), Herman Tolentino (CDC), Gaurav Nanda (Purdue University), and Mark Lehto (Purdue University).

Workers’ compensation claims data usually includes a useful free-text (unstructured) data field that describes the cause of the claim and can be a rich source of information. However, manual coding these data fields is resource intensive and becomes impractical when the scope of a project includes a large number of claims. This webinar continued to introduce the audience to useful auto-coding techniques that utilize computer learning algorithms to code unstructured data.

1/16/14: Worker Compensation Causation Auto-Coding

The second webinar sponsored by the Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies held on Thursday, January 16, 2014 is now available online. Experts from the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety (Helen L. Corns and Helen Marucci-Wellman, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (Stephen J. Bertke and Alysha R. Meyers) and Purdue University (Mark R. Lehto) presented on the topic of auto-coding.

Workers’ compensation claims data usually includes a useful free-text (unstructured) data field that describes the cause of the claim and can be a rich source of information. However, manual coding these data fields is resource intensive and becomes impractical when the scope of a project includes a large number of claims. This webinar introduced the audience to useful auto-coding techniques that utilize computer learning algorithms to code unstructured data.

8/20/13: Worker Compensation Denominators

CWCS Webinar - WC Denominators 

This webinar described sources of denominators for workers' compensation data analysis. Several researchers provided presentations that highlighted their recent analyses and methods for identifying appropriate denominators (e.g. person hours or employee counts) for workers' compensation trending. Speakers included Martha Jones (Vanderbilt University), Mike Lampl (Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation), Tim Bushnell (NIOSH), and Steve Wurzelbacher (NIOSH). Copies of the presentation are available by request by emailing: cwcs@cdc.gov

NIOSH Numbered Publications

Workers’ Compensation Insurance Primer for Public Health

This NIOSH numbered document describes workers’ compensation insurance, the industry, its records, and the potential uses of relevant information for public health purposes. A need for the document was identified at the second workshop on workers compensation data use for occupational injury and illness prevention. The document was prepared with broad stakeholder input and published in 2013.

Occupational safety and health research and surveillance are essential for the prevention and control of injuries, illnesses and hazards that arise from the workplace. Research and surveillance can fill gaps in knowledge about where hazards exist and what interventions are effective at preventing workplace injuries, illnesses and fatalities. Workers’ compensation insurance records are a resource used for these primary prevention purposes. In addition, workers’ compensation records may be used for early detection of health outcomes in populations of workers which is part of secondary prevention. They may also be used to help identify effective medical treatment which is part of tertiary prevention.

Workers' Compensation Insurance: A Primer for Public Health

Use of Workers’ Compensation Data for Occupational Safety and Health: Proceedings of June 2012 Workshop

Several government agencies and private organizations sponsored a workshop on the use of workers’ compensation data for occupational safety and health purposes which was held in June 2012. The workshop fostered discussions on opportunities for collaboration in the analysis of workers’ compensation data in order to help reduce the risks of occupational injuries and illnesses. Stakeholders from private insurance carriers, insurance associations, self-insured corporations, academic institutions and government agencies participated. This second workshop on this topic included discussions of 6 draft white papers along with 35 platform and poster presentations on research with workers’ compensation data. The following can be found within this document, NIOSH Publication Number 2013-147 :

  • Bhattacharya A, Schulte PA, Anderson V. Workers’ Compensation Costs in Wholesale and Retail Trade Sectors in US.
  • Krohm G, Wolf-Horejsh J, Aeillo T. Using Workers’ Compensation Administrative Data to Analyze Injury Rates.
  • Morin J, Utterback DF, Shor G, Welsh L, Bogyo T, Wurzelbacher SJ. Workers’ Compensation Loss Prevention.
  • Meyers AR, Wurzelbacher SJ, Bertke SJ, Lampl M, Robins DR, Bell J. Using workers’ compensation data for surveillance of occupational injuries and illnesses — Ohio, 2005–2009.
  • Wurzelbacher SJ, Meyers AR, Bertke SJ, Lampl M, Robins DR, Bushnell PT, Tarawneh A, Childress D, Turnes J. Comparison of cost valuation methods for workers compensation.

Use of Workers’ Compensation Data for Occupational Injury and Illness Prevention: Proceedings of September 2009 Workshop

The Use of Workers’ Compensation Data for Occupational Injury and Illness Prevention Workshop was convened to discuss opportunities for collaboration in the analysis of workers’ compensation data in order to help reduce the risks of occupational injuries and illnesses. Stakeholders from private insurance carriers, insurance associations, self-insured corporations, academic institutions and government agencies participated. Presentations described differences among state laws, proper interpretation of common industry terms, proprietary interests in insurance data, public release of internal analyses, and methods for linking workers’ compensation data with other health and employment data. The summary section describes the discussion sessions that identified some of the key advantages, limitations and future opportunities for collaborative research and surveillance using workers’ compensation data. The proceedings may be accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2010-152/ .

 

Journal Articles

This list includes peer-reviewed journal articles that were reviewed by NIOSH and determined to be related to one or more of the current CWCS goals. In the attachments, the articles are organized according to related CWCS goal, activity, main injury-illness outcome, and industry.

WC Reference List 2_24_14.pdf

WC Reference List 2_24_14.xslx


Continuing Education

Accreditation Statements

CEU:  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is authorized by IACET to offer 0.1 CEU's for this program.

CPH: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a pre-approved provider of Certified in Public Health (CPH) recertification credits and is authorized to offer 1.0 CPH recertification credits for this program.

CDC is an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Effective October 1, 2013, the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE) accepts continuing education units (CEU) for CPH recertification credits from CDC. Please select CEU as your choice for continuing education when registering for a course on TCEOnline. Learners seeking CPH should use the guidelines provided by the NBPHE for calculating recertification credits. For assistance please contact NBPHE at http://www.NBPHE.org.

Origination Date: 4/14/2016

Expiration Date: 4/14/2018

DISCLOSURE Statement

In compliance with continuing education requirements, all presenters must disclose any financial or other associations with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters as well as any use of unlabeled product(s) or product(s) under investigational use.

CDC, our planners, presenters, and their spouses/partners wish to disclose they have no financial interests or other relationships with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters. Planners have reviewed content to ensure there is no bias. 

Content will not include any discussion of the unlabeled use of a product or a product under investigational use.

CDC did not accept commercial support for this continuing education activity.

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