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May 1994
Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Concentrations (IDLH)

n-Propyl acetate

CAS number: 109–60–4

NIOSH REL: 200 ppm (840 mg/m3) TWA, 250 ppm (1,050 mg/m3) STEL

Current OSHA PEL: 200 ppm (840 mg/m3) TWA

1989 OSHA PEL: 200 ppm (840 mg/m3) TWA, 250 ppm (1,050 mg/m3) STEL

1993-1994 ACGIH TLV: 200 ppm (835 mg/m3) TWA, 250 ppm (1,040 mg/m3) STEL

Description of substance: Colorless liquid with a mild, fruity odor.

LEL(@100°F): 1.7% (10% LEL(@100°F), 1,700 ppm)

Original (SCP) IDLH: 8,000 ppm

Basis for original (SCP) IDLH: The chosen IDLH is based on the statement by ACGIH [1971] that a 4-hour exposure to 8,000 ppm was fatal to 4 of 6 rats [Smyth et al. 1954].

Short-term exposure guidelines: None developed

ACUTE TOXICITY DATA:

Lethal concentration data:

 

SpeciesReferenceLC50

(ppm)

LCLo

(ppm)

TimeAdjusted 0.5-hr

LC (CF)

Derived value
CatFlury & Wirth 1933 -----8,9415 hr19,223 ppm (2.15)1,922 ppm
RatSmyth et al. 1969 LC67: 8,000-----4 hr16,000 ppm (2.0) 1,600 ppm

Lethal dose data:

 

SpeciesReferenceRouteLD50

(mg/kg)

LDLo

(mg/kg)

Adjusted LDDerived value
Rat

Mouse

Rabbit

Rat

Jenner et al. 1964

Jenner et al. 1964

Munch 1972

Smyth et al. 1969

oral

oral

oral

oral

9,370

8,300

6,640

8,700

-----

-----

-----

-----

15,433 ppm

13,671 ppm

10,936 ppm

14,329 ppm

1,543 ppm

1,367 ppm

1,094 ppm

1,433 ppm

Other animal data: It has been reported that based on acute inhalation studies, n-propyl acetate appears to be more toxic than isopropyl acetate and ethyl acetate but less toxic than n-butyl acetate [ACGIH 1991].

Human data: None relevant for use in determining the revised IDLH.

 

Revised IDLH: 1,700 ppm

Basis for revised IDLH: The revised IDLH for n-propyl acetate is 1,700 ppm based on acute inhalation toxicity data in animals [Flury and Wirth 1933; Smyth et al. 1969]. The revised IDLH is roughly the same as the revised IDLHs for ethyl acetate and n-butyl acetate and is also 10% of the lower explosive limit of 1.7% (which was determined at 100°F). This may be a conservative value due to the lack of relevant acute inhalation toxicity data for workers.

REFERENCES:

1. ACGIH [1971]. n-Propyl acetate. In: Documentation of the threshold limit values for substances in workroom air. 3rd ed. Cincinnati, OH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, p. 216.

2. ACGIH [1991]. n-Propyl acetate. In: Documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 6th ed. Cincinnati, OH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, p. 1300.

3. Flury F, Wirth W [1933]. Zur toxikologie der lösungsmittel. (Verschieden ester, aceton, methylalkohol.) Arch Gewerbepath Gewerbehyg 5:1-90 (in German).

4. Jenner PM, Hagan EC, Taylor JM, Cook EL, Fitzhugh OG [1964]. Food flavourings and compounds of related structure. I. Acute oral toxicity. Food Cosmet Toxicol 2:327-343.

5. Munch JC [1972]. Aliphatic alcohols and alkyl esters: narcotic and lethal potencies to tadpoles and to rabbits. Ind Med Surg 41:31-33.

6. Smyth HF Jr, Carpenter CP, Weil CS, Pozzani UC [1954]. Range-finding toxicity data: list V. AMA Arch Ind Hyg Occup Med 10:61-68.

7. Smyth HF Jr, Carpenter CP, Weil CS, Pozzani UC, Striegel JA, Nycum JS [1969]. Range-finding toxicity data: list VII. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 30(5):470-476.

 
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