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Hepatitis C in the United States

Graphics with Key Data for Hepatitis C in the US and among Baby Boomers

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This graphic shows that more than 75 percent of American adults with hepatitis C are baby boomers.

Hepatitis C is an unrecognized health crisis in the United States. This life-threatening infection affects an estimated 3.2 million Americans, and more than 75 percent of American adults with hepatitis C are baby boomers.
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This line graph shows the number of Americans who die each year from hepatitis C-related illnesses. The number of deaths has increased each year since 1999, reaching approximately 15,000 in 2007.

Hepatitis C is a virus that attacks the liver. It is the leading cause of liver transplants and liver cancer — the fastest-rising cause of all cancer-related deaths — in the United States. The number of Americans who die each year from hepatitis C-related illnesses has increased each year since 1999, reaching approximately 15,000 in 2007.
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These pie charts show the overall burden for hepatitis C in the US and the proportion of baby boomers who are infected. An estimated 3.2 million Americans are infected with hepatitis C. Of that number, 2.1 million are baby boomers. Up to 1.5 million baby boomers are unaware of their infection. However, CDC’s proposed recommendations for one-time testing among all baby boomers could identify an additional 800,000 hepatitis C infections.

Testing saves lives: An estimated 3.2 million Americans are infected with hepatitis C. Of that number, 2.1 million are baby boomers. Up to 1.5 million baby boomers are unaware of their infections. However, CDC estimates that implementing the new testing recommendations could identify 800,000 additional hepatitis C infections. Providing these patients with appropriate care and treatment could prevent more than 120,000 deaths.
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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

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