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ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Perceived Stress, Behavior, and Body Mass Index Among Adults Participating in a Worksite Obesity Prevention Program, Seattle, 2005–2007

Our analysis evaluated cross-sectional associations between perceived stress and dietary behaviors and physical activity. We hypothesized that differences in eating behavior associated with stress were dependent on eating awareness. We also evaluated an overall association of perceived stress with obesity. At the group level, environmental factors at work and home contribute to perceived stress. At the individual level, obesity can lead to disease risk.

Figure. Hypothesized conceptual model of biobehavioral association of perceived stress with obesity. Bolded arrows indicate relationships assessed in this study.

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