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Epidemiology & Risk Factors

Transmission

Human scabies is caused by an infestation of the skin by the human itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis). The adult female scabies mites burrow into the upper layer of the skin (epidermis) where they live and deposit their eggs. The microscopic scabies mite almost always is passed by direct, prolonged, skin-to-skin contact with a person who already is infested. An infested person can spread scabies even if he or she has no symptoms. Humans are the source of infestation; animals do not spread human scabies.

Persons At Risk

Scabies can be passed easily by an infested person to his or her household members and sexual partners. Scabies in adults frequently is sexually acquired.

Scabies is a common condition found worldwide; it affects people of all races and social classes. Scabies can spread easily under crowded conditions where close body and skin contact is common. Institutions such as nursing homes, extended-care facilities, and prisons are often sites of scabies outbreaks. Child care facilities also are a common site of scabies infestations.

Crusted (Norwegian) Scabies

Some immunocompromised, elderly, disabled, or debilitated persons are at risk for a severe form of scabies called crusted, or Norwegian, scabies. Persons with crusted scabies have thick crusts of skin that contain large numbers of scabies mites and eggs. The mites in crusted scabies are not more virulent than in non-crusted scabies; however, they are much more numerous (up to 2 million per patient). Because they are infested with such large numbers of mites, persons with crusted scabies are very contagious to other persons. In addition to spreading scabies through brief direct skin-to-skin contact, persons with crusted scabies can transmit scabies indirectly by shedding mites that contaminate items such as their clothing, bedding, and furniture. Persons with crusted scabies should receive quick and aggressive medical treatment for their infestation to prevent outbreaks of scabies.

 
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  • Page last reviewed: November 2, 2010
  • Page last updated: November 2, 2010
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