Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home
May 1994
 

Documentation for Immediately Dangerous To Life or Health Concentrations (IDLHs)


Propylene oxide

CAS number: 75–56–9

NIOSH REL: None established; NIOSH considers propylene oxide to be a potential occupational carcinogen as defined by the OSHA carcinogen policy [29 CFR 1990].

Current OSHA PEL: 100 ppm (240 mg/m3) TWA

1989 OSHA PEL: 20 ppm (50 mg/m3) TWA

1993-1994 ACGIH TLV: 20 ppm (48 mg/m3) TWA

Description of substance: Colorless liquid with a benzene-like odor.

LEL: . 2.3% (10% LEL, 2,300 ppm)

Original (SCP) IDLH: 2,000 ppm

Basis for original (SCP) IDLH: The chosen IDLH is based on the dog 4-hour LCLO of 2,005 ppm and the mouse 4-hour LC50 of 1,740 ppm [Jacobson et al. 1956 cited by NIOSH 1976].

Short-term exposure guidelines: None developed

ACUTE TOXICITY DATA:

Lethal concentration data:

 

SpeciesReferenceLC50 (ppm)LCLo (ppm)TimeAdjusted 0.5-hr LC (CF)Derived value
Mouse

Dog

Rat

G. pig

Rat

Jacobson et al. 1956

Jacobson et al. 1956

Jacobson et al. 1956

Rowe et al. 1956

Smyth et al. 1969

1,740

-----

4,000

-----

LC67: 4,000

-----

2,005

-----

4,000

-----

4 hr

4 hr

4 hr

4 hr

4 hr

3,480 ppm (2.0)

4,010 ppm (2.0)

8,000 ppm (2.0)

8,000 ppm (2.0)

8,000 ppm (2.0)

348 ppm

401 ppm

800 ppm

800 ppm

800 ppm

Lethal dose data:

 

SpeciesReferenceRouteLD50 (mg/kg)LDLo (mg/kg)Adjusted LDDerived value
G. pig

Rat

Mouse

Rat

G. pig

Gig Tr Prof Zabol 1981

Pugaeva et al. 1970

Pugaeva et al. 1970

Smyth et al. 1941

Smyth et al. 1941

oral

oral

oral

oral

oral

660

380

440

1,140

690

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

1,909 ppm

1,099 ppm

1,273 ppm

3,298 ppm

4,830 ppm

191 ppm

110 ppm

127 ppm

330 ppm

483 ppm

Human data: None relevant for use in determining the revised IDLH.

 

Revised IDLH: 400 ppm

Basis for revised IDLH: The revised IDLH for propylene oxide is 400 ppm based on acute inhalation toxicity data in animals [Jacobson et al. 1956]. [Note: NIOSH recommends as part of its carcinogen policy that the "most protective" respirators be worn for propylene oxide at any detectable concentration.]

REFERENCES:

1. Gig Tr Prof Zabol [1981]; 46(7):76 (in Russian).

2. Jacobson KH, Hackley EB, Feinsilver L [1956]. The toxicity of inhaled ethylene oxide and propylene oxide vapors. Acute and chronic toxicity of ethylene oxide and acute toxicity of propylene oxide. AMA Arch Ind Health 13(3):237-244.

3. NIOSH [1976]. TZ29750. Propane, 1,2-epoxy-. In: Registry of toxic effects of chemical substances, 1976 ed. Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, DHEW (NIOSH) Publication No. 76-191, p. 968.

4. Pugaeva VP, Klochkova SE, et al. [1970]. Experimental materials on hygienic reglamentation of propylene oxide. Gig Tr Prof Zabol 14(11):55-57 (in Russian).

5. Rowe VK, Hollingsworth RL, Oyen F, McCollister DD, Spencer HC [1956]. Toxicity of propylene oxide determined on experimental animals. AMA Arch Ind Health 13:228-236.

6. Smyth HF Jr, Carpenter CP, Weil CS, Pozzani UC, Striegel JA, Nycum JS [1969]. Range-finding toxicity data: list VII. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 30(5):470-476.

7. Smyth HF, Seaton J, Fisher L [1941]. The single dose toxicity of some glycols and derivatives. J Ind Hyg Toxicol 23:259-268.

 
Contact Us:
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO