Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home
May 1994
 

Documentation for Immediately Dangerous To Life or Health Concentrations (IDLHs)


n-Butyl alcohol

CAS number: 71–36–3

NIOSH REL: 50 ppm (150 mg/m3) CEILING [skin]

Current OSHA PEL: 100 ppm (300 mg/m3) TWA

1989 OSHA PEL: 50 ppm (150 mg/m3) CEILING [skin]

1993-1994 ACGIH TLV: 50 ppm (152 mg/m3) CEILING [skin]

Description of Substance: Colorless liquid with a strong, characteristic, mildly alcoholic odor.

LEL: . . 1.4% (10% LEL, 1,400 ppm)

Original (SCP) IDLH: 8,000 ppm

Basis for original (SCP) IDLH: The chosen IDLH is conservative, but the only data available on which to base the IDLH is the statement by Patty [1963] that Smyth [1956] found rats survived when exposed for 4 hours to 8,000 ppm. The IDLH for isobutyl alcohol is also 8,000 ppm.

Short-term exposure guidelines: None developed

ACUTE TOXICITY DATA

Lethal concentration data:

 


Species

Reference
LC5o

(ppm)

LCLo

(ppm)


Time
Adjusted 0.5-hr

LC (CF)

Derived

Value

Mammal

Rat

Esin and Vigdergauz 1986

NPIRI 1974

9,221

8,000

-----

-----

?

4 hr

?

16,000 ppm (2.0)

?

1,600 ppm


Lethal dose data:

 


Species

Reference

Route
LD50

(mg/kg)

LDLo

(mg/kg)


Adjusted LD

Derived value
Rabbit

Rat

Dog

Munch 1972

Purchase 1969

Wurtz 1975

oral

oral

oral

-----

-----

-----

3,484

790

1,700

7,918 ppm

1,795 ppm

4,000 ppm

792 ppm

180 ppm

400 ppm


Other animal data: RD50 (mouse), 4,784 ppm [Alarie 1981].

Human data: It has been reported that corneal irritation was occasionally observed in workers exposed to 200 ppm [Sterner et al. 1949].

 

Revised IDLH: 1,400 ppm [LEL]

Basis for revised IDLH: Based on health considerations and acute inhalation toxicity data in animals [NPIRI 1974], a value of about 1,600 ppm would have been appropriate for n-butyl alcohol. However, the revised IDLH for n-butyl alcohol is 1,400 ppm based strictly on safety considerations (i.e., being 10% if the lower explosive limit of 1.4%).


REFERENCES:

1. Alarie Y [1981]. Dose-response analysis in animal studies: prediction of human responses. Environ Health Perspect 42:9-13.

2. Esin MS, Vigdergauz MS [1986]. Correlation between toxicity indexes and chromatographic characteristics of chemical substances. Gig Sanit 51(5):61-62 (in Russian).

3. Munch JC [1972]. Aliphatic alcohols and alkyl esters: narcotic and lethal potencies to tadpoles and to rabbits. Ind Med Surg 41:31-33.

4. NPIRI [1974]. Raw materials data handbook, physical and chemical properties, fire hazard and health hazard data. Vol. 1. Organic solvents. Bethlehem, PA: National Printing Ink Research Institute, p. 10.

5. Patty FA, ed. [1963]. Industrial hygiene and toxicology. 2nd rev. ed. Vol. II. Toxicology. New York, NY: Interscience Publishers, Inc., p. 1443.

6. Purchase IFH [1969]. Studies in kaffircorn malting and brewing. XXII. The acute toxicity of some fusel oils found in Bantu beer. S Afr Med J 43:795-798.

7. Smyth HF Jr [1956]. Improved communication: hygienic standards for daily inhalation. Am Ind Hyg Assoc Q 17(2):129-185.

8. Sterner JH, Crouch HC, Brockmyre HF, Cusack M [1949]. A ten-year study of butyl alcohol exposure. Am Ind Hyg Assoc Q 10:53-59.

9. Wurtz M [1975]. Sur les proprietes toxiques des alcools par fermentation. Comp Rend Hebdom 81:192-194 (in French).

 
Contact Us:
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO