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May 1994
 

Documentation for Immediately Dangerous To Life or Health Concentrations (IDLHs)


Sodium fluoroacetate

CAS number: 62–74–8

NIOSH REL: 0.05 mg/m3 TWA, 0.15 mg/m3 STEL [skin]

Current OSHA PEL: 0.05 mg/m3 TWA [skin]

1989 OSHA PEL: 0.05 mg/m3 TWA, 0.15 mg/m3 STEL [skin]

1993-1994 ACGIH TLV: 0.05 mg/m3 TWA, 0.15 mg/m3 STEL [skin]

Description of substance: Fluffy, colorless to white (sometimes dyed black), odorless powder.

LEL: . . Noncombustible Solid

Original (SCP) IDLH: 5 mg/m3

Basis for original (SCP) IDLH: The chosen IDLH is based on the statement by Deichmann and Gerarde [1969] that the probable lethal oral dose for an adult is 50 mg. No data on acute inhalation toxicity are available on which to base the IDLH for this highly toxic compound.

Short-term exposure guidelines: None developed

ACUTE TOXICITY DATA:

Lethal dose data:

 

SpeciesReferenceRouteLD50

(mg/kg)

LDLo

(mg/kg)

Adjusted LDDerived value
Rat

Rabbit

Rat

G. pig

Mouse

Lehman 1951

McIlroy 1982

Ward 1946

Ward 1946

Yakkyoku 1977

oral

oral

oral

oral

oral

1.7

0.34

0.1

0.3

0.1

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

12 mg/m

2.4 mg/m

0.7 mg/m

2.1 mg/m

0.7 mg/m

1.2 mg/m3

0.24 mg/m3

0.07 mg/m3

0.21 mg/m3

0.07 mg/m3

Human data: The probable oral lethal dose has been reported to be 50 mg [Deichmann and Gerarde 1969]. [Note: An oral dose of 50 mg is equivalent to a worker being exposed to about 30 mg/m3 for 30 minutes, assuming a breathing rate of 50 liters per minute and 100% absorption.]

 

Revised IDLH: 2.5 mg/m3

Basis for revised IDLH: No inhalation toxicity data are available on which to base an IDLH for sodium fluoroacetate. Therefore, the revised IDLH for sodium fluoroacetate is 2.5 mg/m3 based on acute oral toxicity data in humans [Deichmann and Gerarde 1969].

REFERENCES:

1. Deichmann WB, Gerarde HW [1969]. Sodium fluoroacetate (1080). In: Toxicology of drugs and chemicals. New York, NY: Academic Press, Inc., p. 542.

2. Lehman AJ [1951]. Chemicals in foods: a report to the Association of Food and drug Officials on current developments. Part II. Pesticides. Section I. Introduction. Q Bulletin Assoc Food Drug Off U.S. 15(4):122-123.

3. McIlroy JC [1982]. The sensitivity of Australian animals to 1080 poison. III. Marsupial and eutherian herbivores. Australian Wildlife Research 9:487-503.

4. Ward JC [1946]. Rodent control with 1080, ANTU, and other war-developed toxic agents. Am J Public Health Nations Health 36:1427-1431.

5. Yakkyoku (Pharmacy) [1977]; 28(3):329-339 (in Japanese).

 
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