Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home
May 1994
Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Concentrations (IDLH)

Ethyl acrylate

CAS number: 140–88–5

NIOSH REL: None established; NIOSH considers ethyl acrylate to be a potential occupational carcinogen as defined by the OSHA carcinogen policy [29 CFR 1990].

Current OSHA PEL: 25 ppm (100 mg/m3) TWA [skin]

1989 OSHA PEL: 5 ppm (20 mg/m3) TWA, 25 ppm (100 mg/m3) STEL [skin]

1993-1994 ACGIH TLV: 5 ppm (20 mg/m3) TWA, 15 ppm (61 mg/m3) STEL, A2

Description of Substance: Colorless liquid with an acrid odor.

LEL:. . 1.4% (10% LEL, 1,400 ppm)

Original (SCP) IDLH: 2,000 ppm

Basis for original (SCP) IDLH: The chosen IDLH is based on the statements by Pozzani et al. 1949 cited by Patty [1963], and UCC [1971] that 5 of 6 rats died following a 4-hour exposure to 2,000 ppm, and that 1,000 ppm for 4 hours killed 0 of 6 rats.

Short-term exposure guidelines: None developed

ACUTE TOXICITY DATA

Lethal concentration data:

 


Species

Reference
LC50

(ppm)

LCLo

(ppm)


Time
Adjusted 0.5-hr

LC (CF)

Derived

value

Rat

Rabbit

G. pig

Rat

Mouse

Oberly and Tansy 1985

Pozzani et al. 1949

Pozzani et al. 1949

Pozzani et al. 1949

Sidorov and Timofievskaya 1979

2,180

-----

-----

LC83: 2,000

3,894

-----

1,204

1,204

-----

-----

4 hr

7 hr

7 hr

4 hr

?

4,360 ppm (2.0)

2,890 ppm (2.4)

2,890 ppm (2.4)

4,000 ppm (2.0)

?

436 ppm

289 ppm

289 ppm

400 ppm

?


Other animal data: RD50 (mouse), 315 ppm [DeCeaurriz et al. 1981]. Thirty-day exposures of rats to 300 or 540 ppm resulted in mortality; while rats survived 30-day exposures to 70 ppm [Treon et al. 1949].

Human data: Prolonged inhalation exposures at 50 to 75 ppm produced drowsiness, headache, and nausea [Nemec and Bauer 1978].

 

Revised IDLH: 300 ppm

Basis for revised IDLH: The revised IDLH for ethyl acrylate is 300 ppm based on toxicity data in humans [Nemec and Bauer 1978] and animals [DeCeaurriz et al. 1981; Oberly and Tansy 1985; Pozzani et al. 1949; Treon et al. 1949]. [Note: NIOSH recommends as part of its carcinogen policy that the "most protective" respirators be worn for ethyl acrylate at any detectable concentration.]


REFERENCES:

1. DeCeaurriz JC, Micillino JC, Bonnet P, Guenier JP [1981]. Sensory irritation caused by various industrial airborne chemicals. Toxicol Lett 9(4):137-143.

2. Nemec JW, Bauer W Jr [1978]. Acrylic acid and deviations. In: Encyclopedia of Chemical Toxicology. Vol. I. 3rd ed. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, pp. 330-354.

3. Oberly R, Tansy MF [1985]. LC50 values for rats acutely exposed to vapors of acrylic and methacrylic acid esters. J Toxicol Environ Health 16:811-822.

4. Patty FA, ed. [1963]. Industrial hygiene and toxicology. 2nd rev. ed. Vol. II. Toxicology. New York, NY: Interscience Publishers, Inc., p. 1880.

5. Pozzani U, Weil CS, Carpenter CP [1949]. Subacute vapor toxicity and range-finding data for ethyl acrylate. J Ind Hyg Toxicol 31:311-316.

6. Sidorov KK, Timofievskaya LA [1979]. Data for use in salting the UAC for monoethanolamine in the working environment. Gig Tr Prof Zabol 23(9):55 (in Russian).

7. Treon JF, Sigmon H, Wright H, Kitzmiller KV [1949]. The toxicity of methyl and ethyl acrylate. J Ind Hyg Toxicol 31:317-326.

8. UCC [1971]. Toxicology studies: ethyl acrylate. New York, NY: Union Carbide Corporation.

 
Contact Us:
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO