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May 1994
 

Documentation for Immediately Dangerous To Life or Health Concentrations (IDLHs)


Diacetone alcohol

CAS number: 123–42–2

NIOSH REL: 50 ppm (240 mg/m3) TWA

Current OSHA PEL: 50 ppm (240 mg/m3) TWA

1989 OSHA PEL: Same as current PEL

1993-1994 ACGIH TLV: 50 ppm (238 mg/m3) TWA

Description of Substance: Colorless liquid with a faint, minty odor.

LEL:. . 1.8% (10% LEL, 1,800 ppm)

Original (SCP) IDLH: 2,100 ppm

Basis for original (SCP) IDLH: The only acute inhalation toxicity data available on which to base an IDLH for diacetone alcohol is the statement by Patty [1963] that animals exposed for 1 to 3 hours to 2,100 ppm exhibited restlessness, irritation of the membranes, excitement, and later somnolence [Gross as cited by Lehmann and Flury 1943]. The chosen IDLH is obviously conservative.

Short-term exposure guidelines: None developed

ACUTE TOXICITY DATA

Lethal dose data:

 


Species

Reference

Route
LD50

(mg/kg)

LDLo

(mg/kg)


Adjusted LD

Derived value
Rat

Rabbit

Mouse

Smyth and Carpenter 1948

Walton et al. 1928

Wenzel and Koff 1956

oral

oral

oral

4,000

4,653

3,950

-----

-----

-----

5,797 ppm

6,743 ppm

5,725 ppm

580 ppm

674 ppm

573 ppm


Other animal data: Animals exposed for 1 to 3 hours to 2,100 ppm exhibited restlessness, irritation of the membranes, excitement, and later, somnolence [Lehmann and Flury 1943].

Human data: It has been reported that eye irritation appeared in volunteers exposed for 15 minutes at 100 ppm [Silverman et al. 1946].

 

Revised IDLH: 1,800 ppm (LEL)

Basis for revised IDLH: Based on health considerations and acute inhalation toxicity data in animals [Lehmann and Flury 1943], a value of about 2,000 ppm would have been appropriate. However, the revised IDLH for diacetone alcohol is 1,800 ppm based strictly on safety considerations (i.e., being 10% of the lower explosive limit of 1.8%).


REFERENCES:

1. Gross E [?]. Unpublished. [From Lehmann KB, Flury F, eds. [1943]. Toxicology and hygiene of industrial solvents. Translated by E. King and H.F. Smyth, Jr. Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins Company, pp. 245­246.]

2. Lehmann KB, Flury F, eds. [1943]. Toxicology and hygiene of industrial solvents. Translated by E. King and H.F. Smyth, Jr. Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins Company, pp. 245­246.

3. Patty FA, ed. [1963]. Industrial hygiene and toxicology. 2nd rev. ed. Vol. II. Toxicology. New York, NY: Interscience Publishers, Inc., p. 1752.

4. Silverman L, Schulte HF, First WW [1946]. Further studies on sensory response to certain industrial solvent vapors. J Ind Hyg Toxicol 28:262­268.

5. Smyth HF Jr, Carpenter CP [1948]. Further experience with the range­finding test in the industrial toxicology laboratory. J Ind Hyg Toxicol 30(1):63­68.

6. Walton DC, Kehr EF, Louvenhart AS [1928]. A comparison of the pharmacological action of diacetone alcohol and acetone. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 33:175­183.

7. Wenzel DG, Koff GY [1956]. Anticonvulsant properties of some alkyldiols, alkyldiones and related compounds. J Am Pharm Assoc, Scientific Edition 45(10):669­672.

 
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