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Volume 6: No. 3, July 2009

ESSAY
A Socioeconomic Analysis of Diabesity and Diabesity Prevention in New York City

The 2 maps show the boroughs of New York City. The first map shows the percentage of residents living in poverty, and the second shows the number of diabetes deaths per 100,000 population. Comparison of the 2 maps indicates that areas of greater poverty tend to have higher rates of diabetes deaths.

Figure 1. Maps of New York City showing percentages of residents living in poverty and diabetes deaths per 100,000 population, by borough and neighborhood.

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Household Income Percent of adults who are obese
White Black Hispanic
< $25,000 18 28 25
$25,000 – $49,000 16 27 21
> $50,000 12 23 23

 

Figure 2. Percentage of New York City residents who are obese and their household income, by racial/ethnic group.

Percentages are age-adjusted.
Source: New York City Community Health Survey, 2002. Obesity was defined as body mass index >30 kg/m2, calculated from respondents' height and weight. Complete information was unavailable for Asian household incomes.

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Household Income Percent of adults with diabetes
White Black Hispanic
< $25,000 7 11 14
$25,000 – $49,000 6 10 9
> $50,000 3 8 12

Figure 3. Percentage of New York City adults with diabetes and their household income, by racial/ethnic group.  
Percentages are age-adjusted.
Source: New York City Community Health Survey, 2002.
Survey respondents were asked: Have you ever been told by a doctor that you have diabetes?
Complete information was unavailable for Asian household incomes.

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  Prevalence, %
Boys Girls
Hispanic 36 26
Black 22 24
White 28 14
Asian 26 13

Figure 4. Prevalence (with 95% confidence interval bars) of obesity among New York City public elementary schoolchildren, by sex and race/ethnicity, 2003. 
Source: Thorpe LE, List DG, Marx T, May L, Helgerson SD, Frieden TR. Childhood obesity in New York City elementary school students. Am J Public Health 2004;94(9):1496-1500

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The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


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