Skip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice and Policy

View Current Issue
Issue Archive
Archivo de números en español








Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal
MMWR


 Home 

Volume 1: No. 2, April 2004

SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC HEALTH
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: FEATURED ABSTRACT FROM THE 18TH NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTROL
Whose Choice Is It? Understanding HIV Risk Among African American Women


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Print this article Print this article
E-mail this article E-mail this article:



Send feedback to editors Send feedback to editors
Download this article as a PDF Download this article as a PDF (189K)

You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view PDF files.


Return to list
of abstracts

EM Yancey, LM Goodin, M Wang

Suggested citation for this article: Yancey EM, Goodin LM, Wang M. Whose choice is it? Understanding HIV risk among African American women [abstract]. Prev Chronic Dis [serial online] 2004 Apr [date cited]. Available from: URL: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2004/
apr/03_0034t.htm
.

PEER REVIEWED

The types and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors among African American women ages 17 to 44 years were identified and an intervention was developed to reduce the risk of HIV infection by addressing culture and gender issues specific to these women.

In this intervention, we identified communities with high incidences of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) among African American women.

Before and after the intervention, an HIV Risk Reduction Survey was administered to 422 women to assess risk behavior variables. Focus groups were conducted. An intervention was developed and conducted that consisted of 7 weekly sessions. The intervention used this project's research findings and incorporated the theoretical underpinnings of 2 concepts: Ntu (an Africentric model of spiritual beliefs, practices, culture, and interpersonal relationships) and the Theory of Gender and Power (a social theory about sexual inequities, gender and power, and balances).

Intervention and control group comparisons before and after the intervention indicate a significant increase in HIV knowledge among women in the intervention group, based on the 12-item HIV Knowledge Scale in the Morehouse School of Medicine HIV Reduction in African American Women Survey: Intervention group mean scores pre-intervention vs post-intervention were 8.66 vs 10.01; control group mean scores pre-intervention vs post-intervention were 8.41 vs 8.42 (P = .01). Intention to use condoms increased among women in the intervention group but decreased among women in the control group, based on the 4-item Condom Barrier Beliefs construct (using a Likert scale of 1 to 4) in the Morehouse Survey: Intervention group mean pre-intervention vs post-intervention was 1.64 vs 1.69; control group mean pre-intervention vs post-intervention was 1.64 vs 1.61 (P = .05). Personal risk perceptions increased in both groups (using a 1-item Likert scale of 1 to 5), although less in the intervention group: Intervention group mean pre-intervention vs post-intervention was 1.95 vs 2.01; control group mean pre-intervention vs post-intervention was 1.96 vs 2.33 (P = .05).

Interventions to reduce the risk of HIV infection among African American women should help them understand relationships, facilitate increased knowledge about HIV, and support attitude and behavior changes within the context of their culture and environment. Women in this study showed an interest in seeking information on reducing their risk of HIV infection and possibly initiating steps toward behavior change. A sustained and protracted effort might be needed to help this population move from increased understanding to sustained behavior change.

Corresponding Author: Elleen Yancey, PhD, Center Director, Morehouse School of Medicine, Prevention Research Center, 720 Westview Drive SW, Atlanta, GA 30310. Telephone: 404-752-1511. E-mail: yanceye@msm.edu.

Back to top

 



 



The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors’ affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.


 Home 

Privacy Policy | Accessibility

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed March 22, 2013
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
 HHS logoUnited States Department of
Health and Human Services