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Volume 1: No. 2, April 2004

SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC HEALTH
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: FEATURED ABSTRACT FROM THE 18TH NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTROL
Implementation of the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) Program in Texas


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CS Barroso, DM Hoelscher, SH Kelder, C McCullum, JL Ward, P Cribb, N Murray

Suggested citation for this article: Barroso CS, Hoelscher DM, Kelder SH, McCullum C, Ward JL, Cribb P, et al. Implementation of the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) program in Texas [abstract]. Prev Chronic Dis [serial online] 2004 Apr [date cited]. Available from: URL: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2004/
apr/03_0034b.htm
.

PEER REVIEWED

Implementation of the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) program was evaluated by child nutrition (CN) and physical education (PE) specialists who attended CATCH trainings in Texas during 2001 and 2002.

Coordinated school health programs offer an effective means of providing consistent health promotion messages. CATCH is a school-based nutrition and physical activity program designed to reduce risk factors — unhealthy dietary intake, physical inactivity, and smoking, for example — for chronic diseases among elementary school children.

CN and PE specialists who attended trainings completed a mail survey that assessed factors influencing implementation of CATCH at their schools. A cross-sectional study design was used: response rates were 38.7% for PE specialists and 39.9% for CN specialists.

The mean score for the percentage of PE lessons using CATCH PE activities was 44.7%, and the mean score for the percentage of CN specialists implementing CATCH Eat Smart guidelines was 80.4%. Likert scales were used to score satisfaction with the CATCH program, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree, and mean scores were calculated. Both PE and CN specialists reported that the CATCH program helped them meet PE and food service goals (mean of 3.8 for each). PE and CN specialists were satisfied with the CATCH program (mean scores were 4.1 for PE specialists and 3.9 for CN specialists). PE and CN specialists would recommend the CATCH program to others (mean of 4.1 for each).

Results indicate that CATCH is being implemented and is viewed positively by both CN and PE specialists in schools in which personnel were trained using a coordinated school health model.

Corresponding Author: Cristina Barroso, MPH, Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas-Houston School of Public Health, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, 7000 Fannin, 2610 A, Houston, TX 77030. Telephone: 713-500-9603. E-mail: Cristina.S.Barroso@uth.tmc.edu.

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The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors’ affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.


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