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Surveillance of Certain Health Behaviors and Conditions Among States and Selected Local Areas --- Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), United States, 2006

Prepared by
Greta Kilmer, MS, Henry Roberts, PhD, Elizabeth Hughes, DrPH, Yan Li, MPH, Balarami Valluru, MS, Amy Fan, PhD, Wayne Giles, MD, Ali Mokdad, PhD, Ruth Jiles, PhD
Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Corresponding author: Greta Kilmer, MS, Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2990 Brandywine Road, MS E-65, Atlanta, GA 30341. Telephone: 678-530-8953; Fax: 678-530-9958; E-mail: gfq8@cdc.gov.

Abstract

Problem: Behavioral risk factors such as smoking, poor diet, physical inactivity, and excessive drinking are linked to the leading causes of death in the United States. Controlling these behavioral risk factors and using preventive health services (e.g., influenza vaccinations and cholesterol screenings) can reduce morbidity and mortality in the U.S. population substantially. Continuous monitoring both of health behaviors and of the use of preventive services is essential for developing health promotion activities, intervention programs, and health policies at the state, city, and county level.

Reporting Period Covered: January--December 2006.

Description of the System: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based, random-digit--dialed telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. population aged >18 years. BRFSS collects data on health-risk behaviors and use of preventive health services related to the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. This report presents results for 2006 for all 50 states, DC, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, 145 selected metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs), and 234 corresponding counties.

Results: Prevalence estimates of risk behaviors, chronic conditions, and the use of preventive services varied substantially by state and territory, MMSA, and county. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of fair or poor health ranged from 11% to 33% for states and territories, from 8% to 24% for MMSAs, and from 5% to 24% for counties. The estimated prevalence of health-care coverage ranged from 61% to 96% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimated prevalence of teeth extraction among adults aged >65 years was lowest in Hawaii (10%) and highest in Kentucky (39%) and West Virginia (41%). The estimated prevalence of activity limitation as a result of physical, mental, or emotional problems ranged from 10% to 28% for states and territories, from 13% to 36% for MMSAs, and from 11% to 29% for counties. The estimated prevalence of adults who had a recent routine checkup ranged from 45% to 81% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimated prevalence of annual influenza vaccination among adults aged >65 years was lowest in Puerto Rico (33%) and highest in Colorado (76%). The estimated prevalence of pneumococcal vaccination among older adults ranged from 30% to 75% for states and territories, from 52% to 80% for MMSAs, and from 42% to 82% for counties.

The estimated prevalence of sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy among adults aged >50 years ranged from 38% to 84% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimated prevalence among adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years was lowest in Puerto Rico (5%) and highest in DC and Maine (33%). The estimated prevalence among women having a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding 3 years ranged from 72% to 89% for states and territories, from 75% to 94% for MMSAs, and from 75% to 95% in counties. The estimated prevalence among women aged >40 years having a mammogram during the preceding 2 years ranged from 60% to 89% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimated prevalence among men aged >40 years who had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test during the preceding 2 years was lowest in Hawaii (40%) and highest in Puerto Rico (66%). The estimated prevalence of cigarette smoking ranged from 9% to 29% for states and territories and from 6% to 31% for MMSAs and counties. The estimated prevalence of binge drinking was lowest in Kentucky and Tennessee (9%) and highest in Wisconsin (24%). The estimated prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity ranged from 11% to 41% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. Seat belt use was lowest in North and South Dakota (58%) and highest in California, Hawaii, and Washington (92%). The estimated prevalence among adults who were overweight ranged from 32% to 40% for states and territories, from 31% to 45% for MMSAs, and from 24% to 49% for counties. The estimated prevalence of obesity ranged from 10% to 46% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimated current asthma prevalence ranged from 3% to 14% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimated prevalence of diabetes ranged from 2% to 13% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. The estimated prevalence of coronary heart disease among adults aged >45 years ranged from 5% to 20% for states and territories. The estimated prevalence of a history of stroke history among adults aged >45 years ranged from 2% to 10% for states and territories, MMSAs, and counties.

Interpretation: This report indicates that substantial variations in health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, and the use of preventive health services exist among adults from state to state and within states and underscores the continued need for prevention and health promotion activities at the local, state, and federal levels.

Public Health Action: Healthy People 2010 objectives have been established to monitor health behaviors and the use of preventive health services. Local and state health departments and federal agencies use BRFSS data to measure progress toward achieving national and local health objectives. Continued surveillance is needed to design, implement, and evaluate public health policies and programs that can lead to a reduction in morbidity and mortality from the effects of health-risk behaviors and subsequent chronic conditions.

Introduction

The leading causes of death in the United States include chronic diseases (e.g., heart disease and cancer), injuries (e.g., suicides and accidents), and preventable infectious diseases (e.g., influenza and pneumonia) (1). The risk factors associated with the leading causes of death include personal health behaviors (e.g., cigarette smoking) and nonuse of health services (e.g. cancer screenings) (2). The estimated prevalence of these risk factors varies across the United States, and constant surveillance is necessary to identify groups at highest risk.

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based surveillance system that is used to monitor progress in achieving national health goals and to direct the public health making decision process. BRFSS has been a source of data since 1984 and is the largest continuously conducted telephone survey in the world. Because of the large sample size, estimates are available for 53 states and territories and for 145 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs) and 234 counties across the United States.

Healthy People 2010 objectives have been established to monitor health behaviors and the use of preventive health services. Communities that achieve these goals are expected to attain decreased morbidity and premature mortality by preventing associated risk factors (3). This report contains comparisons between 2006 BRFSS data and Healthy People 2010 objectives.

Methods

In 2006, BRFSS was conducted in all 50 states, the District of Columbia (DC), Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. BRFSS uses a multistage sampling design based on random-digit--dialing methods to select a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population aged >18 years in each state and territory. The primary focus of BRFSS is to monitor the use of preventive services and the health behaviors and conditions that are linked with the leading causes of death. Details on the design, random sampling procedures, and reliability and validity of measures used in BRFSS have been described previously (4).

Questionnaire

The 2006 BRFSS questionnaire contained three components: 1) standardized core questions asked of all study respondents in all states and territories, 2) optional modules containing standardized questions on specific health-related topics that states and territories could select to include in their surveys, and 3) additional questions developed for and used by one or more states and territories to address specific health-care concerns.

The core questions addressed demographics, health status, number of healthy days, access to health care, physical activity, diabetes, oral health, cardiovascular disease, asthma, disabilities, tobacco/cigarette use, veteran's status, alcohol consumption, adult influenza immunization, slips and falls, seatbelt use, drinking and driving, women's health issues, prostate cancer screening, colorectal cancer screening, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), and emotional support and life satisfaction. The state-optional modules included sets of questions related to diabetes (selected by 48 states), anxiety and depression (41 states), random child selection (39 states), childhood asthma prevalence (38 states), secondhand smoke policy (22 states), folic acid (15 states), adult asthma history (14 states), sexual violence (13 states), child influenza vaccine supplement (nine states), intimate partner violence (nine states), visual impairment and access to eye care (nine states), family planning (eight states), general preparedness (four states), number of healthy days (four states), indoor air quality (two states), reactions to race (two states), and home environment (one state).

This report focuses on 1) health status indicators (health-care coverage, oral health, and disability), 2) health-risk behaviors (no leisure-time physical activity, current cigarette smoking, binge drinking, and seat belt use), 3) preventive practices (i.e., recent routine checkup; influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations for persons aged >65 years; and use of preventive health screenings for cancer [Papanicolaou (Pap) test, mammogram, colorectal cancer screening [sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and blood stool test], and prostate cancer screening [prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test]), 4) chronic conditions (prevalence of diabetes, asthma, and adults who were overweight or obese), and 5) cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease [CHD] and a history of stroke).

Data Collection and Processing

Trained interviewers administer BRFSS using a computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) system. Data are collected monthly by each state and territory. After the monthly interviewing cycle ends, data are submitted to CDC, which checks the data for reliability.

Data Weighting

At the end of the survey year, CDC edits and aggregates the monthly data files to create a yearly sample for each state. For this analysis, each sample was weighted to the respondent's probability of selection and to the age- and sex-specific population or age-, sex-, and race-specific population data using the 2006 census projections reported by the Census Bureau for each state. These sampling weights were used to calculate state-, MMSA-, and county-level prevalence estimates. MMSAs used in this report were those defined by the Office of Management and Budget. Respondents were assigned to a particular MMSA on the basis of their Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) county code. Detailed weighting and analytic methodologies have been documented previously (4).

Statistical Analyses

SAS® and SUDAAN® (release 9.0.1; Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina) were used in the analyses to account for the complex sampling design and calculate prevalence estimates, standard errors, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) (5,6). Statistics were not reported if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width was >10. Only MMSAs with >500 respondents or >19 respondents per weighting class were included. Counties were excluded if the estimated population was <10,000 persons. Responses coded as "do not know" or "refused" were excluded from the analyses.

Results

In 2006, a total of 355,710 interviews were completed. Data were collected from all 50 states, DC, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. This report presents results for 2006 from 145 selected MMSAs and 234 corresponding counties. The number of interviews completed ranged from 1,953 in Alaska to 22,973 in Washington (median: 5,292), and the Council of American Survey and Research Organization (CASRO) response rates ranged from 35.1% in New Jersey to 66.0% in Nebraska (median: 51.4%).

Health Indicators

Health Status

Respondents were asked to rate their general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those who reported good, very good, or excellent health. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of fair or poor health among adults aged >18 years ranged from 10.8% (95% CI = 9.8%--11.8%) in Minnesota to 32.9% (95% CI = 31.4%--34.4%) in Puerto Rico (median: 14.7%) (Table 1). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence among respondents who had fair or poor health ranged from 8.2% (95% CI = 7.0%--9.4%) in Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont to 24.3% (95% CI = 16.2%--32.4%) in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 14.4%) (Table 2). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.1% (95% CI = 2.4%--7.8%) in Douglas County, Colorado to 24.0% (95% CI = 17.7%--30.3%) in Franklin County, Washington (median: 13.9%) (Table 3).

Health-Care Coverage

Health-care coverage was defined as respondents having reported that they had private health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations) or government health plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid). In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >18 years who had health-care coverage ranged from 70.2% (95% CI = 68.2%--72.2%) in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 92.4% (95% CI = 91.4%--93.4%) in Puerto Rico (median: 85.5%) (Table 4). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 60.9% (95% CI = 55.6%--66.2%) in El Paso, Texas to 93.8% (95% CI = 91.3%--96.3%) in Nassau-Suffolk, New York (median: 86.3%) (Table 5). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 60.9% (95% CI = 55.6%--66.2%) in El Paso County, Texas to 96.1% (95% CI = 93.7%--98.5%) in Howard County, Maryland (median: 86.8%) (Table 6).

Oral Health-Teeth Extraction

Oral health status was assessed by asking respondents aged >65 years, "How many of your permanent teeth have been removed because of tooth decay or gum disease?" In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >65 years who had all of their natural teeth extracted ranged from 9.6% (95% CI = 7.6%--11.6%) in Hawaii to 40.5% (95% CI = 37.2%--43.8%) in West Virginia (median: 19.3%) (Table 7). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.1% (95% CI = 4.2%--10.0%) in Hilo, Hawaii, to 48.1% (95% CI = 38.2%--58.0%) in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 17.3%) (Table 8). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.1% (95% CI = 1.8%--8.4%) in Middlesex County, Connecticut to 37.8% (95% CI = 28.4%--47.2%) in Kanawha County, West Virginia (median: 16.4%) (Table 9).

Disability-Limited Activity

In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults >18 years who reported limitations in activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems ranged from 10.1% (95% CI = 8.9%--11.3%) in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 27.7% (95% CI =26.1%--29.3%) in Kentucky (median: 19.9%) (Table 10). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 12.8% (95% CI = 11.5%--14.1%) in Honolulu, Hawaii to 35.8% (95% CI = 27.6%--44.0%) in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 19.3%) (Table 11). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 10.9% (95% CI = 7.8%--14.0%) in Dallas County, Texas to 28.6% (95% CI = 22.5%--34.7%) in Nez Perce County, Idaho (median: 19.1%) (Table 12).

Preventive Practices

Recent Routine Checkup

A routine checkup is defined as a general physical examination, not an examination for a specific injury, illness, or condition. Respondents were defined as having a recent routine checkup if they reported visiting a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding year. In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >18 years who had a recent routine checkup ranged from 53.3% (95% CI = 51.3%--55.3%) in Utah to 80.3% (95% CI = 78.6%--82.0%) in Rhode Island (median: 65.9%) (Table 13). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 46.0% (95% CI = 40.2%--51.8%) in Provo-Orem, Utah to 79.7% (95% CI = 78.1%--81.3%) in Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts (median: 66.9%) (Table 14). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 45.4% (95% CI = 39.6%--51.2%) in Utah County, Utah to 80.9% (95% CI = 78.7%--83.1%) in Providence County, Rhode Island (median: 68.4%) (Table 15).

Influenza Vaccination

In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months ranged from 33.1% (95% CI = 30.2%--36.0%) in Puerto Rico to 75.9% (95% CI = 73.4%--78.4%) in Colorado (median: 69.1%) (Table 16). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 54.1% (95% CI = 47.7%--60.5%) in Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada to 80.9% in Denver-Aurora, Colorado (95% CI = 77.4%--84.4%) and Kapaa, Hawaii (95% CI = 72.9%--88.9%) (median: 69.3%) (Table 17). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 42.6% (95% CI = 35.1%--50.1%) in Miami-Dade County, Florida to 90.2% (95% CI = 81.6%--98.8%) in Howard County, Maryland (median: 70.7%) (Table 18).

Pneumococcal Vaccination

In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >65 years who had ever had a pneumococcal vaccination ranged from 29.5% (95% CI = 26.6%--32.4%) in Puerto Rico to 74.7% (95% CI = 72.1%--77.3%) in Oregon (median: 66.8%) (Table 19). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 52.4% (95% CI = 47.8--57.0%) in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida to 79.6% (95% CI = 72.0%--87.2%) in Billings, Montana (median: 67.2%) (Table 20). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 42.2% (95% CI = 34.7%--49.7%) in Miami-Dade County, Florida to 82.1% (95% CI = 75.3%--88.9%) in Denver County, Colorado (median: 68.0%) (Table 21).

Cancer Prevention

Sigmoidoscopy or Colonoscopy. In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy ranged from 37.8% in Puerto Rico (95% CI = 35.7%--39.9%) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (95% CI = 34.8%--40.8%) to 69.2% (95% CI = 67.1%--71.3%) in Rhode Island (median: 57.1%) (Table 22). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 44.9% (95% CI = 39.0%--50.8%) in Scottsbluff, Nebraska to 72.4% (95% CI = 67.5%--77.3%) in Barre, Vermont (median: 61.0%) (Table 23). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 43.9% (95% CI = 36.8%--51.0%) in Lake County, Indiana to 83.6% (95% CI = 77.1%--90.1%) in Westchester County, New York (median: 62.2%) (Table 24).

Blood Stool Test. In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years ranged from 5.1% (95% CI = 4.1%--6.1%) in Puerto Rico to 32.5% in DC (95% CI = 29.9%--35.1%) and Maine (95% CI = 30.3%--34.7%) (median: 24.1%) (Table 25). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 8.9% (95% CI = 4.6%--13.2%) in Provo-Orem, Utah to 43.5% (95% CI = 38.1%--48.9%) in Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina (median: 25.0%) (Table 26). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.1% (95% CI = 2.6%--9.6%) in Weber County, Utah to 46.6% (95% CI = 39.0%--54.2%) in Guilford County, North Carolina (median: 24.9%) (Table 27).

Pap Test. In 2006, the estimated prevalence among women aged >18 years who had a Pap test during the preceding 3 years ranged from 72.3% (95% CI = 69.8%--74.8%) in Puerto Rico to 89.4% (95% CI = 87.5%--91.3%) in DC (median: 84.0%) (Table 28). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 74.7% (95% CI = 67.1%--82.3%) in Farmington, New Mexico to 93.9% (95% CI = 90.9%--96.9%) in Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas (median: 85.9%) (Table 29). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 74.7% (95% CI = 67.1%--82.3%) in San Juan County, New Mexico to 95.4% (95% CI = 91.9%--98.9%) in Summit County, Utah (median: 86.7%) (Table 30).

Mammogram. In 2006, the estimated prevalence among women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years ranged from 61.3% (95% CI = 58.1%--64.5%) in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 84.8% (95% CI = 83.5%--86.1%) in Massachusetts (median: 76.5%) (Table 31). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 60.6% (95% CI = 53.1%--68.1%) in Provo-Orem, Utah to 87.8% (95% CI = 83.3%--92.3%) in San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California (median: 77.8%) (Table 32). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 60.0% (95% CI = 52.3%--67.7%) in Utah County, Utah to 88.9% (95% CI = 83.6%--94.2%) in Durham County, North Carolina (median: 78.3%) (Table 33).

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is a blood test that measures the level of PSA, an enzyme that is produced only by the prostate gland. High levels of PSA in the blood can indicate the development of early-stage prostate cancer. The PSA test also is used to determine any change in results from previous PSA levels. In 2006, the estimated prevalence among men aged >40 years who had a PSA test during the preceding 2 years ranged from 40.0% (95% CI = 37.2%--42.8%) in Hawaii to 65.7% (95% CI = 62.5%--68.9%) in Puerto Rico (median: 53.8%) (Table 34). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 39.5% (95% CI = 31.5%--47.5%) in San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California to 66.9% (95% CI = 59.1%--74.7%) in Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida (median: 53.8%) (Table 35). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 39.7% (95% CI = 36.0%--43.4%) in Honolulu County, Hawaii to 71.7% (95% CI = 64.5%--78.9%) in Ocean County, New Jersey (median: 53.4%) (Table 36).

Health-Risk Behaviors

Current Cigarette Smoking

Respondents were classified as current smokers if they reported having smoked at least 100 cigarettes during their lifetime and indicated that they smoked every day or some days at the time of the survey. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults >18 years ranged from 8.9% (95% CI = 7.7%--10.1%) in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 28.5% (95% CI = 26.7%--30.3%) in Kentucky (median: 20.0%) (Table 37). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of current smoking ranged from 5.9% (95% CI = 3.5%--8.3%) in Provo-Orem, Utah to 31.2% (95% CI = 26.9%--35.5%) in Casper, Wyoming (median: 19.5%) (Table 38). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.7% (95% CI = 3.3%--8.1%) in Utah County, Utah to 31.2% (95% CI = 26.9%--35.5%) in Natrona County, Wyoming (median: 18.9%) (Table 39).

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking was defined as having five or more drinks on at least one occasion during the preceding month. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of binge drinking among adults aged >18 years ranged from 8.6% in Kentucky (95% CI = 7.3%--9.9%) and Tennessee (95% CI = 7.0%--10.2%) to 24.3% (95% CI = 22.6%--26.0%) in Wisconsin (median: 15.4%) (Table 40). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of binge drinking ranged from 5.5% (95% CI = 2.9%--8.1%) in Provo-Orem, Utah to 24.8% (95% CI = 18.5%--31.1%) in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota (median: 15.0%) (Table 41). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.7% (95% CI = 2.2%--7.2%) in DeSoto county, Mississippi to 24.9% (95% CI = 16.6%--33.2%) in St. Louis City, Missouri (median: 15.2%) (Table 42).

Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity

Leisure-time physical inactivity was defined as the respondent not participating in exercise (e.g., running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking) other than as a part of the respondent's regular job during the preceding month. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of physical inactivity among adults >18 years ranged from 14.2% (95% CI = 12.9%--15.5%) in Minnesota to 41.2% (95% CI = 39.5%--42.9%) in Puerto Rico (median: 22.8%) (Table 43). Among selected MMSAs, respondents reporting physical inactivity ranged from 12.9% (95% CI = 11.2%--14.6%) in Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin to 31.4% in El Paso, Texas (95% CI = 26.5%--36.3%) and Huntington- Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (CI= 23.8%--39.0%) (median: 21.8%) (Table 44). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 10.6% in Orange County, North Carolina (95% CI = 7.0%--14.2%) and Douglas County, Colorado (95% CI = 6.8%--14.4%) to 36.1% (95% CI = 31.5%--40.7%) in Hudson County, New Jersey (median: 21.6%) (Table 45).

Seat Belt Use

In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >18 years who always wore seat belts when driving or riding in a car ranged from 58.4% in North Dakota (95% CI = 56.5%--60.3%) and South Dakota (95% CI = 56.7%--60.1%) to 91.9% (95% CI = 90.9%--92.9%) in California (median: 79.9%) (Table 46). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of respondents who always wore seat belts ranged from 58.8% (95% CI = 53.4%--64.2%) in Scottsbluff, Nebraska to 93.3% (95% CI = 91.0%--95.6%) in Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California (median: 83.3%) (Table 47). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 58.0% (95% CI = 52.5%--63.5%) in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska to 94.1% (95% CI = 91.5%--96.7%) in Douglas County, Washington (median: 84.8%) (Table 48).

Chronic Conditions

Overweight

Self-reported weight and height were used to calculate body mass index (BMI) (weight [kg]/height [m2]). Respondents were classified as being overweight if they had a BMI of >25.0 and <30.0. In 2006, the estimated prevalence among adults aged >18 years who were overweight ranged from 32.1% (95% CI = 30.1%--34.1%) in DC to 39.6% (95% CI = 37.6%--41.6%) in Rhode Island (median: 36.5%) (Table 49). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 30.5% (95% CI = 25.9%--35.1%) in Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas to 44.6% (95% CI = 36.7%--52.5%) in Toledo, Ohio (median: 36.4%) (Table 50). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 23.6% (95% CI =15.3%--31.9%) in Hamilton County, Ohio to 48.7% (95% CI = 42.0%--55.4%) in Newport County, Rhode Island (median: 36.8%) (Table 51).

Obesity

Respondents were classified as obese if their BMI was >30.0. Obesity analyses were restricted to adults aged >20 years to permit comparison with Healthy People 2010 objectives (3). In 2006, the estimated prevalence of obesity among adults aged >20 years ranged from 18.7% (95% CI = 17.5%--19.9%) in Colorado to 31.9% (95% CI = 30.3%--33.5%) in Mississippi (median: 25.8%) (Table 52). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 14.6% (95% CI = 11.0%--18.2%) in Santa Fe, New Mexico to 45.5% (95% CI = 37.0%--54.0%) in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 25.1%) (Table 53). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 9.8% (95% CI = 5.6%--14.0%) in Summit County, Utah to 36.9% (95% CI = 30.3%--43.5%) in Charles County, Maryland (median: 24.4%) (Table 54).

Asthma

Respondents were defined as currently having asthma if they reported having ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had asthma and still had asthma at the time of the survey. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of current asthma among adults aged >18 years ranged from 4.5% (95% CI = 3.6%--5.4%) in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 10.5 % (95% CI =9.3%--11.7%) in Rhode Island (median: 8.4%) (Table 55). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of asthma ranged from 4.5% (95% CI = 2.2%--6.8%) in Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas to 12.1% (95% CI = 9.1%--15.1%) in Essex County, Massachusetts (median: 8.4%) (Table 56). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.0% (95% CI = 1.7%--4.3%) in Somerset County, New Jersey to 13.8% (95% CI = 3.9%--23.7%) in Lorain County, Ohio (median: 8.3%) (Table 57).

Diabetes

Diabetes status was assessed by asking respondents, "Have you been told by a doctor that you have diabetes?" Respondents reporting gestational diabetes or prediabetes were not considered diabetic for these analyses. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged >18 years ranged from 5.3% (95% CI = 4.7%--5.9%) in Colorado to 12.1% (95% CI = 11.0%--13.2%) in West Virginia (median: 7.5%) (Table 58). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes ranged from 3.8% (95% CI = 2.0%--5.6%) in Kalispell, Montana to 12.7% (95% CI = 8.7%--16.7%) in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 7.5%) (Table 59). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.4% (95% CI = 0.3%--4.5%) in Summit County, Utah to 12.9% (95% CI = 8.9%--16.9%) in Gaston County, North Carolina (median: 7.4%) (Table 60).

Cardiovascular Disease

Coronary Heart Disease

Respondents were classified as having CHD if they reported having ever been told by a doctor that they had CHD, including heart attack or angina. CHD analyses were restricted to adults aged >45 years. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of CHD among adults aged >45 years ranged from 5.2% (95% CI = 3.9%--6.5%) in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 19.7% (95% CI = 18.1%--21.3%) in West Virginia (median: 11.8%) (Table 61). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of CHD ranged from 6.1% (95% CI = 3.6%--8.6%) in Billings, Montana to 21.6% (95% CI = 15.3%--27.9%) in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 11.4%) (Table 62). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.6% (95% CI = 1.2%--10.0%) in Summit County, Utah to 20.0% (95% CI = 14.8%--25.2%) in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania (median: 10.9%) (Table 63).

Stroke

Respondents were classified as having a history of stroke if they reported having ever been told by a doctor that they had a stroke. Stroke analyses were restricted to adults aged >45 years. In 2006, the estimated prevalence of stroke among adults aged >45 years ranged from 3.0% (95% CI = 2.4%--3.6%) in Puerto Rico to 7.7% (95% CI = 6.5%--8.9%) in Alabama (median: 4.7%) (Table 64). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of stroke ranged from 2.1% (95% CI = 1.0%--3.2%) in Barre, Vermont to 8.7% (95% CI = 5.2%--12.2%) in Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California (median: 4.4%) (Table 65). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.5% in New York County, New York (95% CI = 0.2%--2.8%) and Harris County, Texas (95% CI = 0.4%--2.6%) to 9.7% (95% CI = 4.7%--14.7%) in Berkeley County, South Carolina (median: 4.0%) (Table 66).

Discussion

The findings in this report indicate variations in the estimated prevalence of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases, and use of preventive screening practices among U.S. adults at the state and territory, MMSA, and county level. These variations might reflect differences in the demographic factors of respondents, including age, race, and sex distribution of the population; socioeconomic conditions; availability and access to health-care services; state and local ordinances, and patterns of reimbursement for preventive services. The results provided in this report were estimated on the basis of survey results and might be different than those derived by other methods. Multiple methods are available to estimate prevalence at the local level. State and local public health authorities can use BRFSS data to plan, direct, implement, and monitor the effectiveness of intervention strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality.

Healthy People 2010 objectives have been established for certain health behaviors (3). The data presented in this report can be compared with these goals to measure progress toward meeting the national objectives (Table 67). The comparisons are a general assessment because many states have established their own public health goals for 2010 that utilize various data sources.

Health Indicators

Although health status is measured using a single question, this concept is complex and has been demonstrated to predict both mortality and clinical events (7,8). In 2006, the proportion of adults who reported fair or poor health varied from 5.1% in Douglas County, Colorado to 32.9% in Puerto Rico.

Because health insurance coverage is strongly associated with access to preventive care, lack of health insurance often leads to adverse health outcomes (9). The Healthy People 2010 objective for health insurance coverage (objective no. 1-1) is 100%; no state and territory, MMSA, or county achieved this goal in 2006. According to BRFSS weighted estimates for 2006, approximately 35 million adults in the United States do not have health insurance.

Extraction of all natural teeth is considered an endpoint influenced by the incidence of dental caries and/or periodontal disease earlier in life. As is the case with other health indicators, teeth extraction is strongly associated with socioeconomic status (10). In 2006, a total of 68% of states and territories, 76% of MMSAs, and 84% of counties achieved the Healthy People 2010 objective of <22% of adults aged >65 years having lost or had all of their natural teeth extracted (objective no. 21-4).

Persons with chronic diseases often experience some type of disability as their disease progresses. The estimated prevalence of disabilities that inhibit the normal activities of daily living emphasizes the need for better disease prevention and management and for better allocation of resources (11). In 2006, the proportion of adults who experienced limited activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems ranged from 10.1% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 35.8% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio.

Preventive Practices

Chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes require multifaceted interventions that address health behaviors and recommended screenings. Routine checkups in primary care settings not only provide various screenings for chronic diseases, but also present opportunities for lifestyle interventions (12). In 2006, the percent of adults who visited a doctor for a routine checkup in the past year ranged from 45.4% in Utah County, Utah to 80.9% in Providence County, Rhode Island.

Adults aged >65 years are at increased risk for hospitalization and death as a result of acute respiratory illnesses caused by influenza and pneumonia, both of which can be prevented through vaccination. Vaccination coverage can be improved by providing education to the public and encouraging health-care providers to offer the pneumonia vaccine year round (13). Only one community (Howard County, Maryland) was able to achieve the Healthy People 2010 objective of >90% of adults aged >65 years receiving the influenza vaccine (objective no. 14-29a). No states and territories, MMSAs, or counties achieved the goal for pneumonia vaccination (>90%) (objective no. 14-29b).

Cancer Prevention

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths; an estimated 50%--60% of these deaths could be prevented if all persons aged >50 years were screened as recommended (14). The Healthy People 2010 objective for persons aged >50 years who had ever received a sigmoidoscopy was 50% (objective no. 3-12). In 2006, approximately 95% of state/territories, MMSAs, and counties accomplished this goal. The Healthy People 2010 objective for persons aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years was 33% (objective no. 3-12); no state or territory, 15 MMSAs, and 27 counties achieved this goal.

A Pap test is used to detect abnormal or cancerous cells in the cervix. Because of the increased use of the Pap test, cervical cancer incidence and mortality have declined in the United States (15). The Healthy People 2010 objective for Pap test screening during the preceding 3 years for women aged >18 years is 90% (objective no. 3-11b). Although no states or territories reached this goal in 2006, approximately 15% of MMSAs and counties have achieved this goal.

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Mammogram screenings are used to detect breast cancer early, thus improving the chances of successful treatment (16). The Healthy People 2010 objective for women aged >40 years who had received a mammogram during the preceding 2 years is 70% (objective no. 3-13). Approximately 90% of states and territories, MMSAs, and counties achieved this goal in 2006.

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. No scientific consensus exists that the PSA screening test is beneficial (17). In 2006, the estimated proportion of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test during the preceding 2 years ranged from 39.5% in San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California to 71.7% in Ocean County, New Jersey.

Health Risk Behaviors

Cigarette smoking is the single most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States (18).The list of diseases caused by cigarette smoking has expanded to include numerous types of cancers, several cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, reproductive effects, cataracts, and low bone density (18). Health consequences of secondhand smoke include pediatric respiratory problems, CHD, and lung cancer in adults (19). The Healthy People 2010 objective for smoking is <12% (objective no. 27-1a) and was achieved by two states, one territory, six MMSAs, and 12 counties in 2006.

Binge drinking might cause impulsive behavior that can lead to risky sexual activity, injuries, and suicide (20,21). Binge drinking over a long period of time can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and other chronic conditions (22). In 2006, a total of 13 states and territories and approximately 30% of MMSAs and counties achieved the Healthy People 2010 objective of <13.4% of adults reporting binge drinking (objective no. 26-11c).

Physical activity is beneficial for adults of all ages and is associated with improved health-related quality of life (23). Certain individual and societal barriers might prevent participation in the recommended level of physical activity. To improve this situation, communities must work to encourage a more active lifestyle (24). The Healthy People 2010 objective for prevalence of no leisure time physical activity is <20% (objective no. 22-1) and was achieved by approximately 20% of states and territories and over 35% of MMSAs and counties in 2006.

Seat belt use in the United States has risen substantially during the preceding three decades and illustrates how public policy can be successful in changing behavior. Laws and types of enforcement vary by state and studies have shown that increased spending on police and safety programs enhances seat belt use (25). Although no states and territories met the Healthy People 2010 objective of 92% for seat belt use (objective no. 15-19) in 2006, a total of 11 MMSAs and 17 counties reached the goal.

Chronic Diseases

Obesity increases the risk for developing serious chronic diseases. The problem involves a complex interaction of lifestyle patterns and calls for pervasive intervention programs at the community level (26). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence among adults >18 years who were overweight ranged from 23.6% to 48.7% and the estimated prevalence of obesity ranged from 9.8% to 45.5% (obesity prevalence is calculated for adults aged >20 years to match with Healthy People 2010 objectives). The Healthy People 2010 objective for obesity (<15%) was achieved by no states and territories, two MMSAs, and five counties in 2006 (objective no. 19-2).

Asthma is a chronic condition that can be life-threatening if not properly treated. Asthma in U.S. adults accounted for an estimated 14.5 million lost work days in 2004, and prescription drugs cost approximately $6 billion annually (27). In 2006, the estimated current asthma prevalence among persons aged >18 years ranged from 3.0% in Somerset County, New Jersey to 13.8% in Lorain County, Ohio.

Adults who have received a diagnosis of diabetes are at risk for developing various complications, including heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney disease. These complications can be prevented by controlling blood glucose levels and receiving proper preventive care (28). In 2006, the estimated diabetes prevalence among persons aged >18 years ranged from 2.4% in Summit County, Utah to 12.9% in Gaston County, North Carolina.

Cardiovascular Disease

CHD can lead to a heart attack and might eventually cause heart failure. Angina or chest pain is the most common symptom of CHD. The prevention and treatment of CHD is complex and widely studied; common risk factors such as high cholesterol, physical inactivity, and smoking typically are addressed (29). In 2006, the estimated prevalence of CHD among persons aged >45 years ranged from 5.2% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 21.6% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia--Kentucky--Ohio.

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and is the leading cause of serious long-term disability. Stroke mortality rates are higher among blacks compared with whites, and the southeastern United States has the highest stroke death rate in the country (30). Among states and territories, the estimated prevalence among persons aged >45 years with a history of stroke ranged from 3.0% in Puerto Rico to 7.7% in Alabama.

Limitations

The findings in this report are subject to several limitations. First, only households with land-line telephones are included in the survey sample; cell phone--only households and households without telephones are excluded. Response rates continue to decline because of changes in telecommunication usage (e.g., increases in the number of cell-phone only households and telephone number portability). CDC is monitoring the effect of changes in telecommunication usage by conducting research on sampling cell-phone numbers, sending prenotification letters, reaching respondents that speak languages other than English and Spanish, and multiple-mode data-collection techniques. Second, BRFSS data are self-reported and are subject to recall bias and social desirability effects. Despite these limitations, BRFSS data have been demonstrated to provide valid and reliable estimates when compared with national household surveys in the United States (31,32). BRFSS is a cost-effective and timely method for collecting state and local data, and often is the only data source available to communities to assess local health conditions and track progress.

Conclusion

The findings in this report indicate the need to strengthen efforts in health promotion and disease prevention programs and policies. BRFSS data are used at the state and local level to renew and maintain efforts to prevent the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States and to monitor progress trends toward achieving Healthy People 2010 objectives.

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2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System State and Territory Project Coordinators

Alabama, Jesse Pevear III, MSPH; Alaska, Rebecca Wells; Arizona, Brian Bender; Arkansas, LaTonya Bynum; California, Marta Induni, PhD; Colorado, Rickey Tolliver, MPH; Connecticut, Diane Aye, PhD; Delaware, Fred Breukelman; District of Columbia, Tracy Garner; Florida, Melissa Murray, MS; Georgia, Leah Bryan, MPH; Guam, William Brandshagen; Hawaii, Florentina Reyes-Salvail, MS; Idaho, Teresa Abbott; Illinois, Bruce Steiner, MS; Indiana, Linda Stemnock; Iowa, Donald Shepherd, PhD; Kansas, Farooq Ghouri, MBBS, MPH; Kentucky, Tracey Sparks; Louisiana, Todd Griffin, MSPH; Maine, Kip Neale; Maryland, Helio Lopez, MS; Massachusetts, Bruce Cohen, PhD; Michigan, Ann Rafferty, PhD; Minnesota, Nagi Salem, PhD; Mississippi, Ron McAnally; Missouri, Janet Wilson, MEd, MPA; Montana, Susan Cummings; Nebraska, Larry Andelt, PhD; Nevada, Alicia Hansen, MS; New Hampshire, Susan Knight, MSPH; New Jersey, Kenneth O'Dowd, PhD; New Mexico, Wayne Honey, MPH; New York, Colleen Baker; North Carolina, Bob Woldman, MA; North Dakota, Melissa Parsons; Ohio, Patricia Coss; Oklahoma, Derek Pate, MPH; Oregon, Renee Boyd; Pennsylvania, Robert Dewar; Puerto Rico, Ruby Serrano-Rodriguez, DrPh; Rhode Island, Jana Hesser, PhD; South Carolina, Kristen Helms, MSPH; South Dakota, Mark Gildemaster; Tennessee, David Ridings; Texas, Michelle Cook, MPH; Utah, Jennifer Wrathall, MPH; Vermont, Rodney McCormick, PhD; U.S. Virgin Islands, Sharon Williams, MS; Virginia, Susan Spain; Washington, Katrina Wynkoop-Simmons, PhD; West Virginia, Fred King; Wisconsin, Anne Ziege, PhD; Wyoming, Menlo Futa, MA.

2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Team

Ali Mokdad, PhD; Suzianne Garner, MPA, Lina Balluz, ScD, Earl Ford, MD, Ruth Jiles, PhD, Jody Hill, Annie Bragg, Indu Ahluwalia, PhD, Julie Brown, Gloria Colclough, Satvinger Dhingra, Amy Fan, MD, PhD, William Garvin, Tod Hebenton, Meaghan Elizabeth House, Shaohua Hu, DrPH, MD, Ram Jain, PhD, Kenneth Laliberte, MPA, Chaoyang Li, PhD, MD, Virginie Mallawaarachchi, PhD, Shravani Reddy Muppidi, Catherine Okoro, MS, William Pearson, PhD, Mohamed Qayad, PhD, Henry Roberts, PhD, James Ribble, Tara Strine, MPH, Machell Town, MS, Judith Wellen, MHS, Guixiang Zhao, MD, PhD, Bill Bartoli, MSc, Farah Chowdhury, MBBS, MPH, Pranesh Chowdhury, MPH, David Gilbertz, MSc, Elizabeth Hughes, DrPH, Greta Kilmer, MS, Yan Li, MPH, Wilmon Murphy, Xiaoting Qin, PhD, Ajay Sharma, Balarami Valluru, MS, Justin Vigeant, John Wen, MD, Yuna Zhong, MD, Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.

Table 1

TABLE 1. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk
Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 3,288 21.3 0.9 (19.6–23.0)
Alaska 2,105 12.5 1.0 (10.6–14.4)
Arizona 4,788 16.3 1.0 (14.3–18.3)
Arkansas 5,581 19.6 0.6 (18.4–20.8)
California 5,703 19.0 0.7 (17.5–20.5)
Colorado 6,074 11.6 0.5 (10.6–12.6)
Connecticut 8,447 11.5 0.4 (10.7–12.3)
Delaware 4,001 12.1 0.7 (10.8–13.4)
District of Columbia 4,009 12.9 0.8 (11.4–14.4)
Florida 10,667 16.8 0.5 (15.8–17.8)
Georgia 7,632 14.8 0.5 (13.7–15.9)
Hawaii 6,552 14.7 0.6 (13.5–15.9)
Idaho 5,337 13.9 0.6 (12.7–15.1)
Illinois 5,179 16.1 0.7 (14.8–17.4)
Indiana 6,526 16.5 0.6 (15.4–17.6)
Iowa 5,422 13.0 0.5 (11.9–14.1)
Kansas 8,272 14.3 0.5 (13.3–15.3)
Kentucky 6,140 23.1 0.7 (21.6–24.6)
Louisiana 7,046 18.4 0.6 (17.3–19.5)
Maine 4,021 13.7 0.6 (12.5–14.9)
Maryland 8,857 12.6 0.5 (11.6–13.6)
Massachusetts 12,646 12.4 0.4 (11.5–13.3)
Michigan 5,649 15.2 0.6 (14.1–16.3)
Minnesota 4,249 10.8 0.5 (9.8–11.8)
Mississippi 6,004 22.5 0.7 (21.2–23.8)
Missouri 5,385 16.8 0.7 (15.4–18.2)
Montana 6,030 13.2 0.5 (12.2–14.2)
Nebraska 7,937 12.9 0.5 (11.9–13.9)
Nevada 3,583 18.5 1.0 (16.5–20.5)
New Hampshire 6,009 11.1 0.5 (10.2–12.0)
New Jersey 13,360 16.2 0.4 (15.3–17.1)
New Mexico 6,568 17.8 0.6 (16.6–19.0)
New York 5,907 16.6 0.7 (15.3–17.9)
North Carolina 15,595 18.1 0.4 (17.3–18.9)
North Dakota 4,771 11.5 0.6 (10.3–12.7)
Ohio 5,813 14.7 0.8 (13.1–16.3)
Oklahoma 6,996 20.2 0.6 (19.1–21.3)
Oregon 4,857 14.2 0.6 (13.0–15.4)
Pennsylvania 13,226 14.7 0.5 (13.6–15.8)
Rhode Island 4,486 14.1 0.6 (12.9–15.3)
South Carolina 8,999 17.0 0.5 (16.1–17.9)
South Dakota 6,626 11.6 0.5 (10.7–12.5)
Tennessee 4,402 18.8 0.8 (17.3–20.3)
Texas 6,798 17.4 0.8 (15.9–18.9)
Utah 5,197 12.9 0.6 (11.7–14.1)
Vermont 7,002 10.9 0.4 (10.1–11.7)
Virginia 5,440 13.1 0.7 (11.8–14.4)
Washington 23,684 13.5 0.3 (12.9–14.1)
West Virginia 3,781 22.5 0.8 (21.0–24.0)
Wisconsin 4,823 12.2 0.6 (11.0–13.4)
Wyoming 4,987 13.9 0.6 (12.8–15.0)
Puerto Rico 4,679 32.9 0.8 (31.4–34.4)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,215 16.4 0.8 (14.8–18.0)
Median 14.7
Range 10.8–32.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
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Table 2

TABLE 2. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by metropolitan and micropolitan
statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 733 9.9 1.4 (7.1–12.7)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,819 14.7 1.1 (12.6–16.8)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 813 14.8 2.3 (10.2–19.4)
Asheville, North Carolina 535 18.8 2.1 (14.7–22.9)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,100 11.7 0.8 (10.1–13.3)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 538 19.3 2.7 (14.0–24.6)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 919 18.3 1.5 (15.3–21.3)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 530 10.1 1.4 (7.4–12.8)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,187 13.2 0.7 (11.8–14.6)
Barre, Vermont 723 9.5 1.1 (7.3–11.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,204 15.3 1.2 (12.9–17.7)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 1,735 10.2 1.0 (8.2–12.2)
Billings, Montana 506 14.4 1.8 (10.9–17.9)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 896 19.8 1.5 (16.8–22.8)
Bismarck, North Dakota 575 11.3 1.4 (8.5–14.1)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,324 12.7 1.1 (10.6–14.8)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 2,337 13.6 1.0 (11.7–15.5)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 905 14.3 1.5 (11.5–17.1)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,446 10.9 0.9 (9.2–12.6)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,045 8.2 0.6 (7.0–9.4)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,336 10.3 0.8 (8.7–11.9)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,770 15.3 1.1 (13.1–17.5)
Casper, Wyoming 609 15.4 1.6 (12.2–18.6)
Charleston, West Virginia 685 23.6 1.8 (20.0–27.2)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,050 11.9 1.1 (9.7–14.1)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,294 15.6 1.0 (13.6–17.6)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 718 11.2 1.3 (8.7–13.7)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,735 15.8 0.9 (14.1–17.5)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 985 13.6 1.8 (10.0–17.2)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 992 14.5 2.0 (10.6–18.4)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 785 9.8 1.1 (7.6–12.0)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,032 15.6 1.3 (13.1–18.1)
Concord, New Hampshire 637 10.8 1.3 (8.3–13.3)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 543 14.6 2.0 (10.6–18.6)
Dayton, Ohio 807 13.4 1.8 (9.8–17.0)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,836 10.7 0.7 (9.4–12.0)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 959 10.6 1.1 (8.5–12.7)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 838 17.4 1.6 (14.3–20.5)
Dover, Delaware 1,375 12.7 1.1 (10.5–14.9)
Durham, North Carolina 1,026 15.8 1.6 (12.8–18.8)
Edison, New Jersey§ 2,954 14.6 0.8 (13.0–16.2)
El Paso, Texas 530 21.7 2.0 (17.8–25.6)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 1,775 14.3 1.6 (11.2–17.4)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 535 14.9 1.8 (11.4–18.4)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 723 13.4 2.5 (8.5–18.3)
Farmington, New Mexico 542 18.6 2.2 (14.4–22.8)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 566 13.9 1.7 (10.6–17.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 762 14.7 1.7 (11.4–18.0)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 502 13.7 2.5 (8.9–18.5)
Great Falls, Montana 520 15.0 1.7 (11.6–18.4)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 948 15.0 1.3 (12.5–17.5)
Greenville, South Carolina 820 14.5 1.4 (11.8–17.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 617 15.4 1.7 (12.0–18.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,682 10.4 0.7 (9.1–11.7)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 649 22.3 2.3 (17.7–26.9)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,403 16.3 1.1 (14.1–18.5)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 703 11.5 1.4 (8.7–14.3)
Honolulu, Hawaii 3,003 14.4 0.8 (12.9–15.9)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 547 18.3 2.9 (12.5–24.1)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 501 24.3 4.1 (16.2–32.4)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,094 14.4 0.9 (12.6–16.2)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,032 18.6 1.5 (15.7–21.5)
Jacksonville, Florida 697 16.1 2.1 (11.9–20.3)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,489 13.7 1.2 (11.3–16.1)
Kalispell, Montana 505 11.0 1.5 (8.2–13.8)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,284 13.5 0.8 (12.0–15.0)
Kapaa, Hawaii 657 16.9 1.8 (13.3–20.5)
Keene, New Hampshire 498 11.5 1.7 (8.2–14.8)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 679 14.6 1.7 (11.3–17.9)

TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 538 20.3 1.9 (16.6–24.0)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,225 19.3 1.4 (16.5–22.1)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,586 10.8 0.9 (8.9–12.7)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 606 15.7 1.7 (12.4–19.0)
Lincoln, Nebraska 773 9.5 1.3 (7.0–12.0)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,233 16.7 1.2 (14.4–19.0)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 768 23.5 2.0 (19.7–27.3)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 919 17.8 1.6 (14.7–20.9)
Lubbock, Texas 572 16.0 1.8 (12.4–19.6)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,439 10.6 0.9 (8.8–12.4)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 838 18.0 1.9 (14.3–21.7)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,158 16.0 1.0 (14.1–17.9)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,365 12.1 1.2 (9.7–14.5)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,468 9.4 0.6 (8.1–10.7)
Missoula, Montana 506 11.2 1.7 (7.9–14.5)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 702 17.6 1.7 (14.3–20.9)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 632 15.6 1.6 (12.5–18.7)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 694 14.3 1.6 (11.1–17.5)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,332 15.6 0.9 (13.8–17.4)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,051 13.3 0.9 (11.5–15.1)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,462 17.7 1.3 (15.1–20.3)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 4,730 18.0 0.9 (16.2–19.8)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 601 12.0 1.5 (9.0–15.0)
Ocean City, New Jersey 549 16.3 1.9 (12.5–20.1)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 846 13.0 1.3 (10.5–15.5)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,177 18.5 1.0 (16.6–20.4)
Olympia, Washington 1,545 11.2 0.9 (9.4–13.0)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,746 12.4 0.9 (10.7–14.1)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 808 15.1 1.4 (12.3–17.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 2,628 13.4 1.0 (11.4–15.4)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,312 16.6 1.5 (13.6–19.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,657 13.7 1.1 (11.6–15.8)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,292 11.7 1.1 (9.5–13.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,798 13.2 0.8 (11.6–14.8)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,689 14.4 0.6 (13.3–15.5)
Provo-Orem, Utah 577 11.7 1.9 (8.1–15.3)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,203 12.0 1.2 (9.7–14.3)
Rapid City, South Dakota 965 11.3 1.1 (9.1–13.5)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,244 15.8 1.2 (13.4–18.2)
Richmond, Virginia 868 13.5 1.5 (10.5–16.5)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 703 20.1 1.9 (16.3–23.9)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,654 10.8 0.9 (9.0–12.6)
Rutland, Vermont 695 14.8 1.6 (11.7–17.9)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,607 13.3 1.2 (11.0–15.6)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,198 13.4 1.0 (11.4–15.4)
San Antonio, Texas 534 19.9 2.5 (14.9–24.9)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 548 16.9 2.1 (12.7–21.1)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 752 13.4 1.7 (10.0–16.8)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 555 14.8 1.9 (11.1–18.5)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 568 19.0 2.0 (15.1–22.9)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,784 16.6 1.7 (13.2–20.0)
Seaford, Delaware 1,316 14.9 1.1 (12.7–17.1)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,788 11.3 0.6 (10.1–12.5)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 641 15.4 1.6 (12.3–18.5)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 902 8.8 0.9 (7.0–10.6)
Spokane, Washington 1,192 13.9 1.1 (11.7–16.1)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,635 13.9 1.1 (11.7–16.1)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,614 15.6 1.1 (13.4–17.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,089 18.3 1.3 (15.7–20.9)
Toledo, Ohio 793 12.5 1.8 (9.0–16.0)
Topeka, Kansas 754 14.8 1.5 (11.8–17.8)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 507 13.5 1.9 (9.7–17.3)
Tucson, Arizona 785 14.4 1.7 (11.1–17.7)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,878 19.2 1.2 (16.9–21.5)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,135 9.7 1.1 (7.6–11.8)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,214 12.6 1.1 (10.5–14.7)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-
West Virginia§ 6,245 12.6 1.5 (9.7–15.5)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,042 17.1 1.5 (14.1–20.1)

TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,656 14.1 1.1 (12.0–16.2)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,813 11.4 0.9 (9.7–13.1)
Wilmington, North Carolina 675 14.5 1.7 (11.1–17.9)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 611 16.2 1.7 (12.8–19.6)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,739 13.0 1.2 (10.6–15.4)
Yakima, Washington 747 21.1 1.9 (17.4–24.8)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 926 18.6 3.1 (12.5–24.7)
Yuma, Arizona 513 20.0 2.1 (15.9–24.1)
Median 14.4
Range 8.2–24.3
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 3

TABLE 3. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 542 17.7 1.8 (14.1–21.3)
Maricopa County, Arizona 878 16.3 1.6 (13.2–19.4)
Pima County, Arizona 785 14.4 1.7 (11.1–17.7)
Pinal County, Arizona 434 NA§ NA —
Yuma County, Arizona 513 20.0 2.1 (15.9–24.1)
Benton County, Arkansas 381 15.5 2.0 (11.5–19.5)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 703 17.4 1.6 (14.3–20.5)
Washington County, Arkansas 327 11.8 2.0 (7.9–15.7)
Alameda County, California 277 12.1 2.2 (7.8–16.4)
Los Angeles County, California 768 23.5 2.0 (19.7–27.3)
Riverside County, California 357 17.4 2.5 (12.6–22.2)
San Bernardino County, California 346 20.1 2.7 (14.9–25.3)
San Diego County, California 548 16.9 2.1 (12.7–21.1)
Adams County, Colorado 433 15.3 2.0 (11.4–19.2)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 634 11.1 1.4 (8.3–13.9)
Denver County, Colorado 584 14.6 1.9 (10.8–18.4)
Douglas County, Colorado 297 5.1 1.4 (2.4–7.8)
El Paso County, Colorado 755 10.0 1.1 (7.8–12.2)
Jefferson County, Colorado 732 8.0 1.1 (5.9–10.1)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,446 10.9 0.9 (9.2–12.6)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,955 11.0 0.8 (9.4–12.6)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 361 11.2 1.9 (7.4–15.0)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,051 13.3 0.9 (11.5–15.1)
New London County, Connecticut 601 12.0 1.5 (9.0–15.0)
Tolland County, Connecticut 366 7.3 1.3 (4.7–9.9)
Kent County, Delaware 1,375 12.7 1.1 (10.5–14.9)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,310 10.7 0.9 (8.8–12.6)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,316 14.9 1.1 (12.7–17.1)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 4,009 13.0 0.8 (11.5–14.5)
Broward County, Florida 728 13.8 1.5 (10.8–16.8)
Duval County, Florida 298 15.8 2.5 (10.9–20.7)
Hillsborough County, Florida 481 17.5 2.0 (13.6–21.4)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 918 18.0 1.5 (15.1–20.9)
Orange County, Florida 432 14.5 2.0 (10.6–18.4)
Palm Beach County, Florida 512 15.8 1.9 (12.0–19.6)
Pinellas County, Florida 346 15.9 2.1 (11.8–20.0)
Clayton County, Georgia 381 14.6 2.0 (10.6–18.6)
Cobb County, Georgia 386 8.8 1.8 (5.3–12.3)
DeKalb County, Georgia 438 10.9 2.6 (5.9–15.9)
Fulton County, Georgia 420 9.1 1.7 (5.8–12.4)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 358 8.1 1.6 (4.9–11.3)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,403 16.3 1.1 (14.1–18.5)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 3,003 14.4 0.8 (12.9–15.9)
Kauai County, Hawaii 657 16.9 1.8 (13.3–20.5)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,489 13.7 1.2 (11.3–16.1)
Ada County, Idaho 656 9.5 1.4 (6.8–12.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 523 17.1 1.8 (13.5–20.7)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 258 16.3 2.4 (11.6–21.0)
Cook County, Illinois 1,689 17.1 1.2 (14.7–19.5)
DuPage County, Illinois 373 13.7 2.4 (9.0–18.4)
Lake County, Illinois 263 12.4 2.6 (7.2–17.6)
Lake County, Indiana 526 16.4 1.8 (12.8–20.0)
Marion County, Indiana 1,341 16.3 1.2 (13.9–18.7)
Polk County, Iowa 726 11.0 1.3 (8.5–13.5)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,441 10.0 1.1 (7.9–12.1)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,246 13.8 1.2 (11.5–16.1)
Shawnee County, Kansas 549 12.8 1.5 (9.9–15.7)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 345 22.3 2.7 (17.0–27.6)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 469 19.7 2.2 (15.3–24.1)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 412 16.2 2.0 (12.2–20.2)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 684 11.7 1.5 (8.8–14.6)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 633 16.1 1.6 (12.9–19.3)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 277 20.3 3.7 (13.0–27.6)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 396 16.0 2.2 (11.6–20.4)
Cumberland County, Maine 673 11.1 1.5 (8.2–14.0)
York County, Maine 469 11.6 1.7 (8.3–14.9)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 577 9.3 1.3 (6.7–11.9)
Baltimore County, Maryland 944 16.3 1.5 (13.4–19.2)
Carroll County, Maryland 256 9.7 1.8 (6.1–13.3)

TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 319 12.3 2.0 (8.4–16.2)
Charles County, Maryland 307 12.4 2.1 (8.3–16.5)
Frederick County, Maryland 585 8.5 1.3 (6.0–11.0)
Harford County, Maryland 289 14.8 2.4 (10.0–19.6)
Howard County, Maryland 322 8.2 1.8 (4.7–11.7)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,150 10.5 1.2 (8.2–12.8)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 656 13.1 1.8 (9.5–16.7)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 274 11.1 2.2 (6.8–15.4)
Washington County, Maryland 405 13.6 1.9 (10.0–17.2)
Baltimore city, Maryland 525 14.3 1.6 (11.2–17.4)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,203 15.7 1.2 (13.4–18.0)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,775 13.3 1.6 (10.2–16.4)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,322 15.9 1.5 (13.0–18.8)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,336 10.0 0.8 (8.4–11.6)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 627 11.7 1.6 (8.6–14.8)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 518 10.0 1.5 (7.1–12.9)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,192 15.9 1.4 (13.1–18.7)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,739 13.0 1.2 (10.6–15.4)
Macomb County, Michigan 381 12.8 1.9 (9.1–16.5)
Oakland County, Michigan 591 13.3 1.7 (10.0–16.6)
Wayne County, Michigan 838 17.4 1.6 (14.3–20.5)
Dakota County, Minnesota 293 12.4 2.4 (7.6–17.2)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 886 8.1 1.0 (6.2–10.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 414 10.4 1.6 (7.2–13.6)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 257 11.9 2.1 (7.7–16.1)
Hinds County, Mississippi 460 18.7 2.2 (14.3–23.1)
Rankin County, Mississippi 271 13.9 2.1 (9.8–18.0)
Jackson County, Missouri 524 15.5 1.8 (12.0–19.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 351 11.4 2.3 (6.9–15.9)
St. Louis city, Missouri 605 18.2 2.5 (13.3–23.1)
Cascade County, Montana 520 15.0 1.7 (11.6–18.4)
Flathead County, Montana 505 11.0 1.5 (8.2–13.8)
Missoula County, Montana 506 11.2 1.7 (7.9–14.5)
Yellowstone County, Montana 461 14.9 1.9 (11.2–18.6)
Douglas County, Nebraska 983 12.3 1.2 (10.0–14.6)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 719 10.1 1.4 (7.4–12.8)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 293 12.3 2.2 (8.1–16.5)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 554 18.9 2.0 (15.0–22.8)
Clark County, Nevada 1,225 19.3 1.4 (16.5–22.1)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,227 15.9 1.2 (13.5–18.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 498 11.5 1.7 (8.2–14.8)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 469 8.9 1.3 (6.4–11.4)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,439 10.6 0.9 (8.8–12.4)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 637 10.8 1.3 (8.3–13.3)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,025 9.1 1.0 (7.1–11.1)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 629 13.6 1.5 (10.7–16.5)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 538 19.3 2.7 (14.0–24.6)
Bergen County, New Jersey 956 12.8 1.3 (10.3–15.3)
Burlington County, New Jersey 548 11.4 1.7 (8.0–14.8)
Camden County, New Jersey 643 15.9 2.0 (12.1–19.7)
Cape May County, New Jersey 549 16.3 1.9 (12.5–20.1)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,035 19.5 1.6 (16.4–22.6)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 579 18.4 2.1 (14.4–22.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 848 23.8 2.1 (19.7–27.9)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 519 9.5 1.6 (6.4–12.6)
Mercer County, New Jersey 507 13.5 1.9 (9.7–17.3)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 826 18.4 1.8 (14.9–21.9)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 759 11.3 1.4 (8.6–14.0)
Morris County, New Jersey 704 10.2 1.3 (7.6–12.8)
Ocean County, New Jersey 791 16.8 1.5 (13.8–19.8)
Passaic County, New Jersey 891 23.5 2.2 (19.2–27.8)
Somerset County, New Jersey 578 7.8 1.2 (5.5–10.1)
Sussex County, New Jersey 555 9.7 1.3 (7.2–12.2)
Union County, New Jersey 490 18.9 2.2 (14.6–23.2)
Warren County, New Jersey 513 12.3 1.6 (9.1–15.5)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,160 13.7 1.2 (11.3–16.1)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 538 20.3 1.9 (16.6–24.0)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 367 16.6 2.7 (11.3–21.9)
San Juan County, New Mexico 542 18.6 2.2 (14.4–22.8

TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 555 14.8 1.9 (11.1–18.5)
Kings County, New York 468 18.6 2.2 (14.3–22.9)
Nassau County, New York 346 15.1 2.4 (10.3–19.9)
New York County, New York 468 15.3 2.0 (11.4–19.2)
Queens County, New York 419 18.6 2.3 (14.1–23.1)
Suffolk County, New York 348 13.4 2.1 (9.2–17.6)
Westchester County, New York 253 14.9 2.8 (9.5–20.3)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 359 17.8 2.3 (13.2–22.4)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 384 19.9 2.7 (14.6–25.2)
Catawba County, North Carolina 400 18.7 2.6 (13.6–23.8)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 443 13.6 1.8 (10.0–17.2)
Durham County, North Carolina 398 19.0 2.6 (13.9–24.1)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 419 16.7 2.2 (12.3–21.1)
Gaston County, North Carolina 388 22.7 2.6 (17.6–27.8)
Guilford County, North Carolina 449 12.6 1.6 (9.4–15.8)
Johnston County, North Carolina 452 20.4 2.4 (15.7–25.1)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 834 13.1 1.5 (10.1–16.1)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 392 15.3 2.5 (10.5–20.1)
Orange County, North Carolina 365 8.5 1.8 (5.0–12.0)
Randolph County, North Carolina 386 19.0 2.2 (14.7–23.3)
Union County, North Carolina 391 16.2 2.9 (10.5–21.9)
Wake County, North Carolina 652 8.8 1.3 (6.2–11.4)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 409 9.8 1.5 (6.9–12.7)
Cass County, North Dakota 675 10.3 1.5 (7.4–13.2)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 422 14.4 2.5 (9.4–19.4)
Hamilton County, Ohio 376 10.6 2.5 (5.7–15.5)
Lorain County, Ohio 486 17.4 4.7 (8.3–26.5)
Lucas County, Ohio 732 15.2 1.5 (12.2–18.2)
Mahoning County, Ohio 832 17.5 1.8 (14.0–21.0)
Montgomery County, Ohio 754 14.4 1.6 (11.2–17.6)
Summit County, Ohio 697 12.2 1.7 (9.0–15.4)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 378 13.7 2.0 (9.7–17.7)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,281 20.5 1.3 (18.0–23.0)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,349 17.7 1.2 (15.3–20.1)
Clackamas County, Oregon 452 11.3 1.8 (7.8–14.8)
Lane County, Oregon 535 14.9 1.8 (11.4–18.4)
Multnomah County, Oregon 775 13.9 1.5 (11.0–16.8)
Washington County, Oregon 506 11.9 1.9 (8.3–15.5)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 516 13.5 1.6 (10.5–16.5)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,499 18.9 1.2 (16.6–21.2)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,628 16.1 1.2 (13.7–18.5)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 308 13.0 2.3 (8.6–17.4)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,758 17.2 1.9 (13.5–20.9)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 280 14.3 2.9 (8.5–20.1)
Kent County, Rhode Island 646 12.8 1.5 (9.9–15.7)
Newport County, Rhode Island 364 8.2 1.7 (4.8–11.6)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,769 16.7 0.9 (15.0–18.4)
Washington County, Rhode Island 517 10.5 1.5 (7.5–13.5)
Aiken County, South Carolina 534 18.0 1.8 (14.4–21.6)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 633 10.5 1.5 (7.6–13.4)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 259 14.5 2.4 (9.9–19.1)
Charleston County, South Carolina 577 10.0 1.4 (7.2–12.8)
Greenville County, South Carolina 513 13.5 1.6 (10.3–16.7)
Horry County, South Carolina 702 17.6 1.7 (14.3–20.9)
Lexington County, South Carolina 321 16.6 2.3 (12.1–21.1)
Richland County, South Carolina 445 13.4 1.7 (10.1–16.7)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 662 8.9 1.1 (6.7–11.1)
Pennington County, South Dakota 754 11.7 1.2 (9.3–14.1)
Davidson County, Tennessee 276 14.6 2.2 (10.3–18.9)
Shelby County, Tennessee 295 20.5 3.1 (14.4–26.6)
Bexar County, Texas 400 20.0 2.7 (14.6–25.4)
Dallas County, Texas 390 18.5 2.9 (12.8–24.2)
El Paso County, Texas 530 21.7 2.0 (17.8–25.6)
Harris County, Texas 382 17.5 3.8 (10.1–24.9)
Lubbock County, Texas 558 15.6 1.8 (12.0–19.2)
Tarrant County, Texas 450 11.7 2.5 (6.8–16.6)
Travis County, Texas 314 12.7 2.2 (8.4–17.0)
Davis County, Utah 415 9.7 1.5 (6.7–12.7)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,675 13.4 1.1 (11.3–15.5)

TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported fair or poor health, by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 253 11.2 2.4 (6.4–16.0)
Tooele County, Utah 270 15.9 2.7 (10.6–21.2)
Utah County, Utah 548 11.6 1.9 (7.9–15.3)
Weber County, Utah 417 17.7 2.1 (13.6–21.8)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,489 7.1 0.7 (5.8–8.4)
Franklin County, Vermont 459 10.9 1.5 (7.9–13.9)
Orange County, Vermont 379 10.7 1.7 (7.4–14.0)
Rutland County, Vermont 695 14.8 1.6 (11.7–17.9)
Washington County, Vermont 723 9.5 1.1 (7.3–11.7)
Windsor County, Vermont 738 12.2 1.4 (9.5–14.9)
Asotin County, Washington 348 16.3 2.3 (11.7–20.9)
Benton County, Washington 364 11.9 2.0 (8.0–15.8)
Chelan County, Washington 539 15.9 1.9 (12.2–19.6)
Clark County, Washington 1,556 13.3 1.0 (11.3–15.3)
Douglas County, Washington 503 17.7 2.1 (13.6–21.8)
Franklin County, Washington 315 24.0 3.2 (17.7–30.3)
King County, Washington 3,251 10.3 0.7 (9.0–11.6)
Kitsap County, Washington 905 14.3 1.5 (11.5–17.1)
Pierce County, Washington 1,614 15.5 1.1 (13.3–17.7)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,537 12.5 1.0 (10.6–14.4)
Spokane County, Washington 1,192 13.9 1.1 (11.7–16.1)
Thurston County, Washington 1,545 11.2 0.9 (9.4–13.0)
Yakima County, Washington 747 21.1 1.9 (17.4–24.8)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 447 21.6 2.2 (17.3–25.9)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 987 13.7 1.5 (10.8–16.6)
Laramie County, Wyoming 718 11.2 1.3 (8.7–13.7)
Natrona County, Wyoming 609 15.4 1.6 (12.2–18.6)
Median 13.9
Range 5.1–24.0
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width was >10.
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Table 4

TABLE 4. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk
Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Alabama 3,291 84.0 1.0 (82.1–85.9)
Alaska 2,098 82.5 1.2 (80.1–84.9)
Arizona 4,802 80.4 1.3 (77.9–82.9)
Arkansas 5,575 79.4 0.8 (77.9–80.9)
California 5,700 82.5 0.8 (80.9–84.1)
Colorado 6,084 83.0 0.7 (81.7–84.3)
Connecticut 8,476 89.9 0.5 (88.9–90.9)
Delaware 3,996 90.4 0.8 (88.8–92.0)
District of Columbia 4,019 91.3 0.7 (89.9–92.7)
Florida 10,699 79.6 0.7 (78.3–80.9)
Georgia 7,689 84.2 0.7 (82.9–85.5)
Hawaii 6,549 91.7 0.5 (90.6–92.8)
Idaho 5,326 81.2 0.8 (79.6–82.8)
Illinois 5,170 84.9 0.8 (83.3–86.5)
Indiana 6,530 84.4 0.7 (83.1–85.7)
Iowa 5,421 89.5 0.6 (88.3–90.7)
Kansas 8,287 87.0 0.6 (85.9–88.1)
Kentucky 6,157 83.0 0.8 (81.4–84.6)
Louisiana 7,060 77.1 0.7 (75.7–78.5)
Maine 4,029 89.6 0.6 (88.3–90.9)
Maryland 8,874 89.9 0.6 (88.8–91.0)
Massachusetts 12,695 91.5 0.5 (90.6–92.4)
Michigan 5,651 87.1 0.7 (85.7–88.5)
Minnesota 4,252 91.8 0.6 (90.6–93.0)
Mississippi 6,022 79.1 0.8 (77.5–80.7)
Missouri 5,379 86.8 0.7 (85.3–88.3)
Montana 6,043 83.4 0.8 (81.9–84.9)
Nebraska 7,945 85.8 0.7 (84.3–87.3)
Nevada 3,571 77.8 1.2 (75.4–80.2)
New Hampshire 6,031 88.6 0.6 (87.4–89.8)
New Jersey 13,414 85.8 0.5 (84.8–86.8)
New Mexico 6,555 78.3 0.8 (76.8–79.8)
New York 5,900 86.5 0.7 (85.1–87.9)
North Carolina 15,620 82.2 0.5 (81.2–83.2)
North Dakota 4,765 88.4 0.7 (87.0–89.8)
Ohio 5,813 87.6 1.1 (85.4–89.8)
Oklahoma 7,003 79.2 0.7 (77.8–80.6)
Oregon 4,856 83.7 0.8 (82.2–85.2)
Pennsylvania 13,221 89.5 0.6 (88.2–90.8)
Rhode Island 4,501 88.7 0.8 (87.2–90.2)
South Carolina 9,001 83.4 0.6 (82.2–84.6)
South Dakota 6,628 86.5 0.7 (85.1–87.9)
Tennessee 4,412 86.7 0.8 (85.1–88.3)
Texas 6,825 74.8 1.0 (72.8–76.8)
Utah 5,190 85.0 0.8 (83.4–86.6)
Vermont 7,001 88.5 0.5 (87.5–89.5)
Virginia 5,428 89.7 0.7 (88.4–91.0)
Washington 23,709 85.5 0.4 (84.7–86.3)
West Virginia 3,791 84.6 0.8 (83.0–86.2)
Wisconsin 4,810 90.3 0.6 (89.0–91.6)
Wyoming 4,977 82.1 0.7 (80.7–83.5)
Puerto Rico 4,683 92.4 0.5 (91.4–93.4)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,216 70.2 1.0 (68.2–72.2)
Median 85.5
Range 70.2–92.4
* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid).
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
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Table 5

TABLE 5. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan
statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 731 91.8 1.7 (88.5–95.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,815 83.4 1.3 (80.8–86.0)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 814 88.4 2.5 (83.4–93.4)
Asheville, North Carolina 536 82.8 2.4 (78.0–87.6)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,108 85.9 1.0 (84.0–87.8)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 540 86.3 2.0 (82.3–90.3)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 923 84.9 1.6 (81.7–88.1)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 533 80.0 2.5 (75.1–84.9)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,196 90.3 0.8 (88.7–91.9)
Barre, Vermont 723 88.2 1.8 (84.6–91.8)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,208 79.7 1.6 (76.6–82.8)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 1,737 92.2 1.1 (90.1–94.3)
Billings, Montana 507 87.8 2.0 (83.8–91.8)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 899 84.6 1.7 (81.2–88.0)
Bismarck, North Dakota 575 90.8 1.5 (87.8–93.8)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,318 81.7 1.5 (78.8–84.6)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 2,348 89.2 1.3 (86.6–91.8)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 908 87.4 1.6 (84.2–90.6)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,459 87.9 1.0 (85.9–89.9)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,043 92.9 0.8 (91.3–94.5)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 2,348 93.0 0.9 (91.2–94.8)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 1,777 89.4 1.2 (87.0–91.8)
Casper, Wyoming 607 82.4 1.8 (78.9–85.9)
Charleston, West Virginia 685 88.5 1.6 (85.5–91.5)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,049 85.2 1.6 (82.1–88.3)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,295 84.1 1.2 (81.7–86.5)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 715 86.6 1.7 (83.3–89.9)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,728 83.6 1.0 (81.6–85.6)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 984 86.0 3.2 (79.7–92.3)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 994 88.6 2.6 (83.6–93.6)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 785 84.1 1.8 (80.5–87.7)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,031 88.3 1.4 (85.6–91.0)
Concord, New Hampshire 639 90.0 1.7 (86.7–93.3)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 546 81.0 2.4 (76.3–85.7)
Dayton, Ohio 809 89.1 1.9 (85.3–92.9)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,840 86.0 0.9 (84.2–87.8)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 960 91.0 1.2 (88.6–93.4)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 838 86.3 1.9 (82.6–90.0)
Dover, Delaware 1,376 90.8 1.2 (88.5–93.1)
Durham, North Carolina 1,026 81.6 1.8 (78.0–85.2)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 2,965 88.0 1.0 (86.0–90.0)
El Paso, Texas 535 60.9 2.7 (55.6–66.2)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 1,779 90.7 1.2 (88.4–93.0)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 534 81.8 2.2 (77.5–86.1)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 723 90.4 2.4 (85.7–95.1)
Farmington, New Mexico 541 70.6 2.7 (65.2–76.0)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 567 80.4 2.4 (75.6–85.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 762 82.0 2.1 (77.9–86.1)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 502 82.9 2.6 (77.8–88.0)
Great Falls, Montana 520 84.7 2.1 (80.6–88.8)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 950 81.2 2.1 (77.0–85.4)
Greenville, South Carolina 819 86.5 1.7 (83.3–89.7)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 618 86.9 2.5 (82.0–91.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,690 91.4 0.8 (89.9–92.9)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 653 82.8 2.5 (77.9–87.7)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,405 86.3 1.3 (83.7–88.9)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 705 79.7 2.6 (74.6–84.8)
Honolulu, Hawaii 3,004 93.6 0.7 (92.3–94.9)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 551 77.1 3.4 (70.5–83.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 504 83.5 3.2 (77.2–89.8)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,097 85.2 1.1 (83.0–87.4)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,030 82.0 1.7 (78.7–85.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 699 85.0 2.0 (81.0–89.0)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,485 86.3 1.5 (83.3–89.3)
Kalispell, Montana 505 80.9 2.3 (76.3–85.5)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,289 87.4 1.1 (85.3–89.5)
Kapaa, Hawaii 655 90.7 1.5 (87.8–93.6)
Keene, New Hampshire 499 85.9 2.5 (81.0–90.8)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 682 85.8 1.8 (82.3–89.3)

TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 535 68.5 2.6 (63.5–73.5)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,218 77.2 1.7 (74.0–80.4)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,587 84.8 1.5 (81.8–87.8)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 607 87.1 1.8 (83.5–90.7)
Lincoln, Nebraska 775 91.3 1.6 (88.1–94.5)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,232 84.6 1.5 (81.7–87.5)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 767 75.7 2.2 (71.4–80.0)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 920 87.3 1.6 (84.1–90.5)
Lubbock, Texas 571 77.6 2.7 (72.3–82.9)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,447 91.0 1.0 (89.0–93.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 839 86.4 1.9 (82.7–90.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,157 79.1 1.3 (76.6–81.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,364 89.4 1.4 (86.6–92.2)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,469 92.7 0.7 (91.3–94.1)
Missoula, Montana 507 83.4 2.4 (78.6–88.2)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 704 78.6 2.6 (73.5–83.7)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 633 89.4 1.7 (86.1–92.7)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 690 93.8 1.3 (91.3–96.3)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 3,349 85.5 1.0 (83.5–87.5)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,057 89.1 1.1 (86.9–91.3)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,470 79.1 1.6 (75.9–82.3)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 4,741 84.0 1.0 (81.9–86.1)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 600 89.5 1.9 (85.9–93.1)
Ocean City, New Jersey 554 89.2 2.1 (85.1–93.3)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 845 90.6 1.4 (87.8–93.4)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,179 80.0 1.1 (77.8–82.2)
Olympia, Washington 1,546 88.0 1.3 (85.4–90.6)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,746 86.8 1.2 (84.4–89.2)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 809 81.0 1.9 (77.3–84.7)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 2,630 89.9 1.3 (87.3–92.5)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,320 80.8 1.8 (77.2–84.4)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,657 89.5 1.2 (87.1–91.9)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,292 93.2 0.9 (91.4–95.0)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,793 86.0 0.9 (84.2–87.8)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,726 89.4 0.6 (88.2–90.6)
Provo-Orem, Utah 577 87.1 2.2 (82.8–91.4)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,203 87.6 1.4 (84.8–90.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 968 85.0 1.6 (81.9–88.1)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,245 80.1 1.5 (77.1–83.1)
Richmond, Virginia 871 90.3 1.8 (86.9–93.7)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 703 84.5 1.8 (80.9–88.1)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 1,657 87.6 1.3 (85.0–90.2)
Rutland, Vermont 695 88.2 1.7 (84.9–91.5)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,604 90.2 1.3 (87.7–92.7)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,195 85.0 1.1 (82.8–87.2)
San Antonio, Texas 538 74.1 2.9 (68.4–79.8)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 547 81.7 2.4 (76.9–86.5)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 750 86.6 2.0 (82.6–90.6)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 557 81.4 2.4 (76.6–86.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 569 87.1 1.8 (83.6–90.6)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,779 92.1 1.2 (89.7–94.5)
Seaford, Delaware 1,312 87.6 1.3 (85.0–90.2)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 4,792 87.3 0.8 (85.7–88.9)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 640 79.6 2.1 (75.4–83.8)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 902 92.0 1.2 (89.6–94.4)
Spokane, Washington 1,192 83.4 1.8 (79.9–86.9)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,634 92.8 1.0 (90.9–94.7)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,616 83.6 1.4 (80.9–86.3)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,093 81.6 1.7 (78.3–84.9)
Toledo, Ohio 790 91.1 1.9 (87.4–94.8)
Topeka, Kansas 756 87.2 1.7 (83.9–90.5)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 507 90.3 2.2 (86.0–94.6)
Tucson, Arizona 785 79.8 2.7 (74.5–85.1)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,874 79.6 1.4 (76.9–82.3)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,130 89.9 1.5 (86.9–92.9)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 1,215 89.4 1.3 (86.8–92.0)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-
West Virginiaķ 6,256 90.7 1.4 (88.0–93.4)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,043 72.8 2.1 (68.8–76.8)

TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,654 88.5 1.2 (86.2–90.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 1,814 90.8 1.1 (88.7–92.9)
Wilmington, North Carolina 678 80.8 2.7 (75.5–86.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 614 84.6 2.0 (80.7–88.5)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,739 91.4 1.2 (89.0–93.8)
Yakima, Washington 749 77.9 2.2 (73.5–82.3)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 928 84.4 4.0 (76.5–92.3)
Yuma, Arizona 512 78.1 2.4 (73.4–82.8)
Median 86.3
Range 60.9–93.8
* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid).
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 6

TABLE 6. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Jefferson County, Alabama 543 83.7 2.2 (79.4–88.0)
Maricopa County, Arizona 884 80.7 2.0 (76.9–84.5)
Pima County, Arizona 785 79.8 2.7 (74.5–85.1)
Pinal County, Arizona 436 82.8 2.9 (77.1–88.5)
Yuma County, Arizona 512 78.1 2.4 (73.4–82.8)
Benton County, Arkansas 380 84.2 2.4 (79.5–88.9)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 703 85.8 1.8 (82.3–89.3)
Washington County, Arkansas 327 82.7 2.8 (77.3–88.1)
Alameda County, California 275 84.4 3.0 (78.6–90.2)
Los Angeles County, California 767 75.7 2.2 (71.4–80.0)
Riverside County, California 357 86.0 2.6 (81.0–91.0)
San Bernardino County, California 346 83.1 2.5 (78.1–88.1)
San Diego County, California 547 81.7 2.4 (76.9–86.5)
Adams County, Colorado 433 83.0 2.4 (78.3–87.7)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 633 85.7 2.0 (81.8–89.6)
Denver County, Colorado 589 81.0 2.4 (76.4–85.6)
Douglas County, Colorado 298 91.1 2.0 (87.2–95.0)
El Paso County, Colorado 756 84.8 1.8 (81.2–88.4)
Jefferson County, Colorado 731 89.7 1.5 (86.7–92.7)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,459 87.9 1.0 (85.9–89.9)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,960 90.7 0.9 (88.9–92.5)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 364 94.5 1.4 (91.8–97.2)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,057 89.1 1.1 (86.9–91.3)
New London County, Connecticut 600 89.5 1.9 (85.9–93.1)
Tolland County, Connecticut 366 94.9 1.1 (92.7–97.1)
Kent County, Delaware 1,376 90.8 1.2 (88.5–93.1)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,308 91.3 1.2 (89.0–93.6)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,312 87.6 1.3 (85.0–90.2)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 4,019 91.3 0.7 (89.9–92.7)
Broward County, Florida 725 81.7 1.9 (78.0–85.4)
Duval County, Florida 300 82.0 3.1 (75.9–88.1)
Hillsborough County, Florida 482 80.1 2.6 (75.1–85.1)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 917 73.6 2.0 (69.7–77.5)
Orange County, Florida 433 80.0 2.6 (74.8–85.2)
Palm Beach County, Florida 515 85.3 2.1 (81.1–89.5)
Pinellas County, Florida 348 85.6 2.6 (80.6–90.6)
Clayton County, Georgia 380 80.1 3.0 (74.2–86.0)
Cobb County, Georgia 389 90.1 1.9 (86.4–93.8)
DeKalb County, Georgia 438 84.0 3.1 (77.9–90.1)
Fulton County, Georgia 421 88.2 2.1 (84.1–92.3)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 358 87.6 2.5 (82.7–92.5)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,405 86.3 1.3 (83.7–88.9)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 3,004 93.6 0.7 (92.3–94.9)
Kauai County, Hawaii 655 90.7 1.5 (87.8–93.6)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,485 86.3 1.5 (83.3–89.3)
Ada County, Idaho 655 86.1 1.9 (82.4–89.8)
Canyon County, Idaho 520 77.7 2.3 (73.2–82.2)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 257 86.9 2.5 (82.1–91.7)
Cook County, Illinois 1,685 81.5 1.4 (78.8–84.2)
DuPage County, Illinois 373 90.0 2.4 (85.3–94.7)
Lake County, Illinois 263 86.0 2.9 (80.3–91.7)
Lake County, Indiana 524 82.8 2.3 (78.2–87.4)
Marion County, Indiana 1,344 84.1 1.4 (81.4–86.8)
Polk County, Iowa 727 90.1 1.5 (87.3–92.9)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,445 91.1 1.3 (88.6–93.6)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,245 87.2 1.4 (84.4–90.0)
Shawnee County, Kansas 552 88.3 1.9 (84.5–92.1)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 345 76.5 3.2 (70.2–82.8)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 469 87.6 2.2 (83.2–92.0)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 411 77.0 2.8 (71.5–82.5)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 688 78.6 2.1 (74.5–82.7)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 640 79.7 2.2 (75.4–84.0)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 277 79.0 3.4 (72.4–85.6)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 395 80.6 3.6 (73.6–87.6)
Cumberland County, Maine 673 93.7 1.2 (91.3–96.1)
York County, Maine 469 92.8 1.5 (89.8–95.8)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 579 91.9 1.8 (88.4–95.4)
Baltimore County, Maryland 950 89.2 1.6 (86.0–92.4)
Carroll County, Maryland 254 93.5 2.0 (89.5–97.5)

TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 322 91.2 2.0 (87.2–95.2)
Charles County, Maryland 305 93.9 1.7 (90.6–97.2)
Frederick County, Maryland 587 91.9 2.0 (88.0–95.8)
Harford County, Maryland 290 92.1 2.0 (88.2–96.0)
Howard County, Maryland 323 96.1 1.2 (93.7–98.5)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,150 92.1 1.2 (89.7–94.5)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 660 87.2 2.0 (83.3–91.1)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 275 89.3 2.7 (84.0–94.6)
Washington County, Maryland 406 87.1 2.5 (82.2–92.0)
Baltimore city, Maryland 525 87.8 1.8 (84.4–91.2)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,225 90.9 1.0 (88.9–92.9)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,779 91.3 1.2 (89.0–93.6)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,321 91.4 1.2 (89.0–93.8)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,348 93.1 0.9 (91.3–94.9)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 631 93.2 2.0 (89.3–97.1)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 523 90.9 1.8 (87.4–94.4)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,194 87.4 1.8 (83.9–90.9)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,739 91.4 1.2 (89.0–93.8)
Macomb County, Michigan 382 85.2 2.7 (79.8–90.6)
Oakland County, Michigan 593 93.8 1.4 (91.0–96.6)
Wayne County, Michigan 838 86.3 1.9 (82.6–90.0)
Dakota County, Minnesota 294 95.5 1.5 (92.5–98.5)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 885 91.2 1.3 (88.7–93.7)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 414 95.1 1.4 (92.3–97.9)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 258 92.7 1.8 (89.1–96.3)
Hinds County, Mississippi 456 78.2 2.5 (73.2–83.2)
Rankin County, Mississippi 272 86.7 2.4 (81.9–91.5)
Jackson County, Missouri 523 84.3 2.4 (79.6–89.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 351 94.7 1.7 (91.3–98.1)
St. Louis city, Missouri 603 84.1 2.4 (79.3–88.9)
Cascade County, Montana 520 84.7 2.1 (80.6–88.8)
Flathead County, Montana 505 80.9 2.3 (76.3–85.5)
Missoula County, Montana 507 83.4 2.4 (78.6–88.2)
Yellowstone County, Montana 462 88.0 2.2 (83.8–92.2)
Douglas County, Nebraska 982 84.8 1.7 (81.5–88.1)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 721 90.5 1.8 (87.1–93.9)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 293 92.1 1.9 (88.5–95.7)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 555 87.5 1.8 (84.0–91.0)
Clark County, Nevada 1,218 77.2 1.7 (74.0–80.4)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,228 80.3 1.5 (77.3–83.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 499 85.9 2.5 (81.0–90.8)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 471 84.3 2.4 (79.5–89.1)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,447 91.0 1.0 (89.0–93.0)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 639 90.0 1.7 (86.7–93.3)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,025 89.5 1.3 (86.9–92.1)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 632 86.8 2.0 (82.9–90.7)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 540 86.3 2.0 (82.3–90.3)
Bergen County, New Jersey 958 90.6 1.4 (87.9–93.3)
Burlington County, New Jersey 552 90.3 2.1 (86.2–94.4)
Camden County, New Jersey 644 86.8 2.3 (82.3–91.3)
Cape May County, New Jersey 554 89.2 2.1 (85.1–93.3)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,043 80.9 1.8 (77.5–84.3)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 581 92.8 1.4 (90.0–95.6)
Hudson County, New Jersey 850 77.5 2.1 (73.4–81.6)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 520 93.9 1.3 (91.4–96.4)
Mercer County, New Jersey 507 90.3 2.2 (86.0–94.6)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 826 86.1 1.9 (82.3–89.9)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 763 87.9 1.9 (84.1–91.7)
Morris County, New Jersey 706 94.1 1.3 (91.5–96.7)
Ocean County, New Jersey 795 88.9 1.7 (85.5–92.3)
Passaic County, New Jersey 896 75.1 2.7 (69.9–80.3)
Somerset County, New Jersey 581 93.3 1.6 (90.1–96.5)
Sussex County, New Jersey 558 86.5 2.8 (81.0–92.0)
Union County, New Jersey 493 82.7 2.5 (77.9–87.5)
Warren County, New Jersey 514 90.8 1.8 (87.3–94.3)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,157 84.5 1.5 (81.6–87.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 535 68.5 2.6 (63.5–73.5)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 367 86.5 2.4 (81.7–91.3)
San Juan County, New Mexico 541 70.6 2.7 (65.2–76.0)

TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 557 81.4 2.4 (76.6–86.2)
Kings County, New York 464 83.3 2.4 (78.6–88.0)
Nassau County, New York 344 93.5 1.6 (90.3–96.7)
New York County, New York 466 87.6 2.5 (82.7–92.5)
Queens County, New York 420 82.0 2.7 (76.8–87.2)
Suffolk County, New York 346 94.2 1.9 (90.4–98.0)
Westchester County, New York 260 86.9 3.4 (80.2–93.6)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 359 84.2 2.6 (79.0–89.4)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 388 80.6 2.9 (74.9–86.3)
Catawba County, North Carolina 402 83.4 3.0 (77.5–89.3)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 444 79.4 2.8 (74.0–84.8)
Durham County, North Carolina 399 79.2 2.8 (73.6–84.8)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 421 83.9 2.5 (79.1–88.7)
Gaston County, North Carolina 390 83.5 2.5 (78.5–88.5)
Guilford County, North Carolina 448 81.6 3.1 (75.6–87.6)
Johnston County, North Carolina 452 79.5 2.9 (73.7–85.3)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 832 87.1 1.8 (83.6–90.6)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 394 83.3 3.4 (76.6–90.0)
Orange County, North Carolina 363 84.6 3.2 (78.4–90.8)
Randolph County, North Carolina 389 79.8 2.9 (74.0–85.6)
Union County, North Carolina 391 83.6 3.3 (77.2–90.0)
Wake County, North Carolina 653 90.2 1.7 (86.9–93.5)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 408 91.7 1.9 (88.0–95.4)
Cass County, North Dakota 675 92.2 1.4 (89.4–95.0)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 424 86.9 3.2 (80.6–93.2)
Hamilton County, Ohio 375 NA§ NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 487 91.7 1.6 (88.5–94.9)
Lucas County, Ohio 728 89.3 1.6 (86.2–92.4)
Mahoning County, Ohio 833 87.6 1.7 (84.2–91.0)
Montgomery County, Ohio 755 89.1 1.8 (85.6–92.6)
Summit County, Ohio 695 90.1 1.8 (86.5–93.7)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 378 87.7 2.3 (83.1–92.3)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,284 76.9 1.5 (73.9–79.9)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,348 78.8 1.6 (75.6–82.0)
Clackamas County, Oregon 451 89.3 2.2 (85.0–93.6)
Lane County, Oregon 534 81.8 2.2 (77.5–86.1)
Multnomah County, Oregon 773 83.9 1.9 (80.2–87.6)
Washington County, Oregon 504 85.4 2.2 (81.1–89.7)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 515 90.5 1.8 (87.0–94.0)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,501 85.4 1.6 (82.2–88.6)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,626 90.0 1.0 (88.0–92.0)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 306 93.1 2.0 (89.2–97.0)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,761 85.2 2.3 (80.6–89.8)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 281 91.4 2.3 (86.9–95.9)
Kent County, Rhode Island 649 88.9 1.9 (85.2–92.6)
Newport County, Rhode Island 367 92.1 1.8 (88.5–95.7)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,777 87.3 1.0 (85.3–89.3)
Washington County, Rhode Island 515 92.4 1.7 (89.0–95.8)
Aiken County, South Carolina 534 83.6 2.1 (79.4–87.8)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 635 82.5 2.7 (77.3–87.7)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 260 78.9 3.5 (72.1–85.7)
Charleston County, South Carolina 577 89.7 1.9 (86.0–93.4)
Greenville County, South Carolina 511 86.2 2.0 (82.3–90.1)
Horry County, South Carolina 704 78.6 2.6 (73.5–83.7)
Lexington County, South Carolina 322 89.8 2.1 (85.6–94.0)
Richland County, South Carolina 444 90.2 1.8 (86.7–93.7)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 663 91.6 1.5 (88.6–94.6)
Pennington County, South Dakota 756 84.0 1.9 (80.3–87.7)
Davidson County, Tennessee 277 89.1 2.7 (83.8–94.4)
Shelby County, Tennessee 294 85.9 2.9 (80.2–91.6)
Bexar County, Texas 402 72.3 3.3 (65.9–78.7)
Dallas County, Texas 393 75.0 3.6 (67.9–82.1)
El Paso County, Texas 535 60.9 2.7 (55.6–66.2)
Harris County, Texas 384 74.5 4.4 (65.8–83.2)
Lubbock County, Texas 556 77.9 2.8 (72.5–83.3)
Tarrant County, Texas 449 82.0 2.8 (76.5–87.5)
Travis County, Texas 316 76.8 3.3 (70.3–83.3)
Davis County, Utah 415 93.1 1.7 (89.8–96.4)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,672 85.2 1.2 (82.8–87.6)

TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 253 83.2 3.1 (77.1–89.3)
Tooele County, Utah 270 85.1 2.9 (79.4–90.8)
Utah County, Utah 548 87.2 2.2 (82.8–91.6)
Weber County, Utah 416 88.5 2.0 (84.6–92.4)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,489 93.6 1.0 (91.7–95.5)
Franklin County, Vermont 457 90.1 1.6 (86.9–93.3)
Orange County, Vermont 379 87.7 2.0 (83.9–91.5)
Rutland County, Vermont 695 88.2 1.7 (84.9–91.5)
Washington County, Vermont 723 88.2 1.8 (84.6–91.8)
Windsor County, Vermont 737 87.6 1.6 (84.6–90.6)
Asotin County, Washington 350 87.0 2.1 (82.9–91.1)
Benton County, Washington 364 89.8 2.0 (85.8–93.8)
Chelan County, Washington 540 69.7 3.0 (63.8–75.6)
Clark County, Washington 1,556 86.6 1.3 (84.1–89.1)
Douglas County, Washington 503 76.2 2.6 (71.0–81.4)
Franklin County, Washington 318 73.0 3.5 (66.2–79.8)
King County, Washington 3,254 88.6 0.8 (87.0–90.2)
Kitsap County, Washington 908 87.4 1.6 (84.2–90.6)
Pierce County, Washington 1,616 83.9 1.4 (81.2–86.6)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,538 87.1 1.3 (84.5–89.7)
Spokane County, Washington 1,192 83.4 1.8 (79.9–86.9)
Thurston County, Washington 1,546 88.0 1.3 (85.4–90.6)
Yakima County, Washington 749 77.9 2.2 (73.5–82.3)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 447 88.4 2.0 (84.5–92.3)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 986 85.2 2.2 (80.9–89.5)
Laramie County, Wyoming 715 86.6 1.7 (83.3–89.9)
Natrona County, Wyoming 607 82.4 1.8 (78.9–85.9)
Median 86.8
Range 60.9–96.1
* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid).
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 7

TABLE 7. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by state/territory —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 813 27.2 1.7 (23.8–30.6)
Alaska 262 23.6 3.4 (16.9–30.3)
Arizona 1,400 14.3 1.4 (11.5–17.1)
Arkansas 1,558 22.7 1.2 (20.4–25.0)
California 1,316 14.0 1.6 (10.9–17.1)
Colorado 1,238 12.9 1.0 (10.9–14.9)
Connecticut 2,191 12.8 0.8 (11.1–14.5)
Delaware 992 17.8 1.5 (14.9–20.7)
District of Columbia 789 20.8 2.0 (16.9–24.7)
Florida 3,109 17.4 0.9 (15.7–19.1)
Georgia 1,721 21.5 1.3 (19.0–24.0)
Hawaii 1,433 9.6 1.0 (7.6–11.6)
Idaho 1,217 19.7 1.3 (17.1–22.3)
Illinois 1,270 19.3 1.4 (16.6–22.0)
Indiana 1,551 21.2 1.2 (18.9–23.5)
Iowa 1,476 19.8 1.1 (17.6–22.0)
Kansas 2,161 19.1 0.9 (17.3–20.9)
Kentucky 1,628 38.9 1.6 (35.9–41.9)
Louisiana 1,473 28.9 1.3 (26.3–31.5)
Maine 912 26.2 1.7 (22.9–29.5)
Maryland 2,131 16.2 1.1 (14.0–18.4)
Massachusetts 3,012 17.2 0.9 (15.5–18.9)
Michigan 1,394 17.3 1.1 (15.1–19.5)
Minnesota 1,051 18.6 1.3 (16.1–21.1)
Mississippi 1,643 31.5 1.3 (28.9–34.1)
Missouri 1,513 24.1 1.6 (21.0–27.2)
Montana 1,474 18.2 1.2 (15.9–20.5)
Nebraska 2,234 18.6 1.0 (16.7–20.5)
Nevada 802 18.4 1.9 (14.6–22.2)
New Hampshire 1,347 18.6 1.2 (16.3–20.9)
New Jersey 3,666 18.2 0.8 (16.6–19.8)
New Mexico 1,588 23.8 1.3 (21.3–26.3)
New York 1,521 17.5 1.1 (15.3–19.7)
North Carolina 4,045 22.6 0.8 (21.0–24.2)
North Dakota 1,327 22.9 1.4 (20.1–25.7)
Ohio 1,560 21.6 1.9 (17.8–25.4)
Oklahoma 2,091 28.3 1.1 (26.1–30.5)
Oregon 1,233 15.9 1.1 (13.7–18.1)
Pennsylvania 3,547 23.9 1.2 (21.5–26.3)
Rhode Island 1,211 17.9 1.2 (15.6–20.2)
South Carolina 2,354 23.0 1.1 (20.8–25.2)
South Dakota 1,909 21.4 1.1 (19.3–23.5)
Tennessee 1,094 34.9 1.9 (31.1–38.7)
Texas 1,689 18.6 1.4 (15.8–21.4)
Utah 1,014 14.8 1.3 (12.3–17.3)
Vermont 1,742 19.7 1.0 (17.7–21.7)
Virginia 1,223 14.4 1.2 (12.0–16.8)
Washington 6,337 15.4 0.6 (14.3–16.5)
West Virginia 1,005 40.5 1.7 (37.2–43.8)
Wisconsin 1,055 16.9 1.3 (14.4–19.4)
Wyoming 1,165 20.1 1.3 (17.6–22.6)
Puerto Rico 1,296 23.6 1.3 (21.0–26.2)
U.S.Virgin Islands 465 12.1 1.9 (8.4–15.8)
Median 19.3
Range 9.6–40.5
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 8

TABLE 8. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 200 21.2 4.2 (13.0–29.4)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 431 19.9 2.2 (15.6–24.2)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 238 28.1 5.1 (18.1–38.1)
Asheville, North Carolina 163 19.3 3.4 (12.6–26.0)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 525 20.0 2.3 (15.6–24.4)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 150 17.6 3.3 (11.2–24.0)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 245 21.5 3.8 (14.1–28.9)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 103 9.0 3.2 (2.8–15.2)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 725 16.7 1.6 (13.5–19.9)
Barre, Vermont 171 17.2 3.0 (11.4–23.0)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 221 25.3 3.2 (19.0–31.6)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 379 8.1 1.5 (5.1–11.1)
Billings, Montana 118 18.1 3.8 (10.7–25.5)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 196 25.2 3.4 (18.5–31.9)
Bismarck, North Dakota 131 16.7 3.5 (9.8–23.6)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 278 18.5 2.7 (13.2–23.8)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 555 18.1 1.8 (14.6–21.6)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 221 19.3 2.9 (13.5–25.1)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 635 9.9 1.7 (6.5–13.3)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 451 16.5 1.9 (12.7–20.3)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 541 15.1 1.9 (11.4–18.8)
Camden, New Jersey§ 502 17.8 1.9 (14.1–21.5)
Casper, Wyoming 146 22.6 3.5 (15.7–29.5)
Charleston, West Virginia 187 38.7 3.9 (31.0–46.4)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 220 20.4 3.2 (14.1–26.7)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 547 23.7 2.3 (19.2–28.2)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 180 15.4 2.8 (10.0–20.8)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 839 17.1 1.8 (13.5–20.7)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 238 19.0 5.0 (9.3–28.7)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 264 25.3 4.5 (16.5–34.1)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 147 14.7 3.1 (8.6–20.8)
Columbia, South Carolina 222 18.3 2.9 (12.6–24.0)
Concord, New Hampshire 153 16.9 3.7 (9.6–24.2)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 110 12.1 4.4 (3.5–20.7)
Dayton, Ohio 245 24.5 4.6 (15.5–33.5)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 563 12.6 1.5 (9.6–15.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 229 13.3 2.5 (8.4–18.2)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 195 17.6 3.0 (11.8–23.4)
Dover, Delaware 311 21.1 2.5 (16.2–26.0)
Durham, North Carolina 225 13.4 2.7 (8.0–18.8)
Edison, New Jersey§ 835 18.2 1.5 (15.2–21.2)
El Paso, Texas 123 14.6 3.4 (7.9–21.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 388 14.2 2.3 (9.7–18.7)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 139 12.9 3.2 (6.6–19.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 158 18.3 4.7 (9.1–27.5)
Farmington, New Mexico 88 NAķ NA —
Fayetteville, North Carolina 110 NA NA —
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 195 23.9 3.7 (16.6–31.2)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 112 NA NA —
Great Falls, Montana 130 13.2 3.7 (5.9–20.5)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 266 23.5 3.1 (17.4–29.6)
Greenville, South Carolina 208 22.5 3.3 (16.1–28.9)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 164 25.3 4.3 (16.9–33.7)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 693 11.4 1.3 (8.9–13.9)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 170 22.6 3.8 (15.1–30.1)
Hilo, Hawaii 318 7.1 1.5 (4.2–10.0)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 233 10.8 2.2 (6.5–15.1)
Honolulu, Hawaii 700 8.9 1.3 (6.4–11.4)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 89 NA NA —
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 146 48.1 5.0 (38.2–58.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 442 23.4 2.5 (18.6–28.2)
Jackson, Mississippi 257 24.8 3.0 (18.9–30.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 149 19.0 3.6 (11.9–26.1)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 274 15.3 2.9 (9.6–21.0)
Kalispell, Montana 131 18.6 4.0 (10.7–26.5)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 743 19.5 1.8 (16.0–23.0)
Kapaa, Hawaii 141 9.7 3.0 (3.8–15.6)
Keene, New Hampshire 114 18.3 3.8 (10.9–25.7)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 152 11.9 2.7 (6.6–17.2)

TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 131 17.3 4.0 (9.4–25.2)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 282 19.2 2.7 (13.9–24.5)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 416 23.2 2.3 (18.7–27.7)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 179 26.9 3.7 (19.6–34.2)
Lincoln, Nebraska 204 10.1 2.1 (6.0–14.2)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 266 15.8 2.5 (10.8–20.8)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 150 11.8 3.7 (4.6–19.0)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 203 25.0 3.3 (18.6–31.4)
Lubbock, Texas 177 19.5 3.2 (13.2–25.8)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 269 15.7 2.4 (11.1–20.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 176 NA NA —
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 613 15.5 1.7 (12.1–18.9)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 264 12.1 2.4 (7.4–16.8)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 519 13.6 1.6 (10.5–16.7)
Missoula, Montana 112 15.7 3.7 (8.5–22.9)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 230 17.1 2.8 (11.6–22.6)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 153 27.0 4.2 (18.8–35.2)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 180 11.1 2.8 (5.6–16.6)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 833 17.8 2.1 (13.7–21.9)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 522 17.0 2.0 (13.0–21.0)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 276 23.5 3.2 (17.2–29.8)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 1,188 14.8 1.5 (11.9–17.7)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 166 11.4 2.5 (6.5–16.3)
Ocean City, New Jersey 201 20.9 3.2 (14.7–27.1)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 170 13.2 2.7 (7.8–18.6)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 568 24.3 2.0 (20.3–28.3)
Olympia, Washington 378 14.4 1.9 (10.6–18.2)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 391 15.9 2.1 (11.8–20.0)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 178 15.7 3.3 (9.3–22.1)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 625 18.4 2.4 (13.7–23.1)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 390 14.2 2.2 (9.8–18.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,037 26.9 2.7 (21.6–32.2)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 286 18.4 2.5 (13.5–23.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 819 15.0 1.6 (11.9–18.1)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 1,736 19.6 1.1 (17.4–21.8)
Provo-Orem, Utah 93 15.5 4.0 (7.7–23.3)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 249 15.8 3.2 (9.5–22.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 240 17.5 2.7 (12.3–22.7)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 255 15.8 2.4 (11.1–20.5)
Richmond, Virginia 186 15.2 3.0 (9.3–21.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 162 14.5 3.4 (7.8–21.2)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 342 18.8 2.3 (14.3–23.3)
Rutland, Vermont 194 13.1 2.5 (8.2–18.0)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 409 19.6 3.0 (13.7–25.5)
Salt Lake City, Utah 395 12.3 1.8 (8.7–15.9)
San Antonio, Texas 143 17.3 3.7 (10.1–24.5)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 130 8.4 2.8 (2.9–13.9)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 189 8.4 2.4 (3.8–13.0)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 127 13.3 3.5 (6.4–20.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 182 24.3 3.5 (17.4–31.2)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 782 24.4 4.0 (16.6–32.2)
Seaford, Delaware 398 22.0 2.3 (17.5–26.5)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 1,050 10.8 1.2 (8.5–13.1)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 156 27.1 4.0 (19.3–34.9)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 223 22.0 3.0 (16.2–27.8)
Spokane, Washington 296 19.6 2.7 (14.4–24.8)
Springfield, Massachusetts 414 17.1 2.3 (12.6–21.6)
Tacoma, Washington§ 376 16.6 2.1 (12.6–20.6)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 320 18.5 2.3 (14.0–23.0)
Toledo, Ohio 170 NA NA —
Topeka, Kansas 206 19.8 3.0 (13.9–25.7)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 139 15.2 3.3 (8.8–21.6)
Tucson, Arizona 273 13.5 2.2 (9.2–17.8)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 577 25.5 2.1 (21.3–29.7)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 245 8.9 1.9 (5.2–12.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 290 16.1 2.5 (11.1–21.1)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-
West Virginia§ 1,195 14.8 2.1 (10.6–19.0)
Wenatchee, Washington 331 14.5 2.1 (10.5–18.5)

TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 433 16.5 1.9 (12.9–20.1)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 386 14.0 2.0 (10.2–17.8)
Wilmington, North Carolina 201 14.7 2.8 (9.3–20.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 170 18.5 3.1 (12.3–24.7)
Worcester, Massachusetts 384 22.6 3.2 (16.3–28.9)
Yakima, Washington 211 16.3 2.7 (10.9–21.7)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 290 NA NA —
Yuma, Arizona 161 17.6 3.3 (11.2–24.0)
Median 17.3
Range 7.1–48.1
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 9

TABLE 9. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 129 24.6 4.2 (16.4–32.8)
Maricopa County, Arizona 233 14.3 2.5 (9.5–19.1)
Pima County, Arizona 273 13.5 2.2 (9.2–17.8)
Pinal County, Arizona 157 12.9 3.0 (7.0–18.8)
Yuma County, Arizona 161 17.6 3.3 (11.2–24.0)
Benton County, Arkansas 110 20.8 4.1 (12.8–28.8)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 156 12.8 2.9 (7.2–18.4)
Washington County, Arkansas 71 NA§ NA —
Alameda County, California 60 NA NA —
Los Angeles County, California 150 11.8 3.7 (4.6–19.0)
Riverside County, California 99 13.0 3.5 (6.2–19.8)
San Bernardino County, California 63 NA NA —
San Diego County, California 130 8.4 2.8 (2.9–13.9)
Adams County, Colorado 76 NA NA —
Arapahoe County, Colorado 131 10.0 2.9 (4.3–15.7)
Denver County, Colorado 145 10.8 2.7 (5.5–16.1)
Douglas County, Colorado NA NA NA —
El Paso County, Colorado 141 15.2 3.2 (8.8–21.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 148 12.9 3.1 (6.8–19.0)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 635 9.9 1.7 (6.5–13.3)
Hartford County, Connecticut 498 12.1 1.6 (9.0–15.2)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 109 5.1 1.7 (1.8–8.4)
New Haven County, Connecticut 522 17.0 2.0 (13.0–21.0)
New London County, Connecticut 166 11.4 2.5 (6.5–16.3)
Tolland County, Connecticut 86 15.6 4.3 (7.1–24.1)
Kent County, Delaware 311 21.1 2.5 (16.2–26.0)
New Castle County, Delaware 283 13.8 2.2 (9.5–18.1)
Sussex County, Delaware 398 22.0 2.3 (17.5–26.5)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 789 20.5 2.0 (16.6–24.4)
Broward County, Florida 188 17.3 3.4 (10.7–23.9)
Duval County, Florida 61 NA NA —
Hillsborough County, Florida 115 21.2 4.3 (12.7–29.7)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 233 18.5 3.0 (12.6–24.4)
Orange County, Florida 73 9.0 3.4 (2.3–15.7)
Palm Beach County, Florida 192 10.7 2.6 (5.6–15.8)
Pinellas County, Florida 118 14.3 3.3 (7.9–20.7)
Clayton County, Georgia 69 NA NA —
Cobb County, Georgia 67 NA NA —
DeKalb County, Georgia 76 NA NA —
Fulton County, Georgia 77 NA NA —
Gwinnett County, Georgia NA NA NA —
Hawaii County, Hawaii 318 7.1 1.5 (4.2–10.0)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 700 8.9 1.3 (6.4–11.4)
Kauai County, Hawaii 141 9.7 3.0 (3.8–15.6)
Maui County, Hawaii 274 15.3 2.9 (9.6–21.0)
Ada County, Idaho 129 14.9 3.8 (7.4–22.4)
Canyon County, Idaho 112 21.5 4.2 (13.3–29.7)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 65 NA NA —
Cook County, Illinois 397 17.1 2.5 (12.1–22.1)
DuPage County, Illinois 73 NA NA —
Lake County, Illinois 51 8.7 3.6 (1.6–15.8)
Lake County, Indiana 121 23.8 4.6 (14.7–32.9)
Marion County, Indiana 290 26.7 3.1 (20.6–32.8)
Polk County, Iowa 172 13.0 2.8 (7.4–18.6)
Johnson County, Kansas 288 10.1 2.0 (6.2–14.0)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 325 15.3 2.0 (11.3–19.3)
Shawnee County, Kansas 152 22.1 3.7 (14.8–29.4)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 61 NA NA —
Jefferson County, Kentucky 123 26.4 4.1 (18.3–34.5)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 91 NA NA —
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 143 17.5 3.4 (10.8–24.2)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 124 22.4 4.3 (14.0–30.8)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 51 NA NA —
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 74 14.4 4.9 (4.7–24.1)
Cumberland County, Maine 148 18.6 3.7 (11.3–25.9)
York County, Maine 102 17.3 3.8 (9.8–24.8)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 135 12.9 3.5 (6.0–19.8)
Baltimore County, Maryland 247 17.1 2.7 (11.8–22.4)
Carroll County, Maryland 65 11.9 4.1 (3.8–20.0)

TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 57 NA NA —
Charles County, Maryland NA NA NA —
Frederick County, Maryland 97 17.2 4.2 (9.1–25.3)
Harford County, Maryland 62 NA NA —
Howard County, Maryland 52 11.0 4.5 (2.2–19.8)
Montgomery County, Maryland 282 6.1 1.5 (3.1–9.1)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 142 NA NA —
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 52 13.0 4.8 (3.6–22.4)
Washington County, Maryland 115 20.6 3.8 (13.1–28.1)
Baltimore city, Maryland 112 21.6 4.3 (13.2–30.0)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 525 27.1 3.2 (20.8–33.4)
Essex County, Massachusetts 388 13.7 2.3 (9.2–18.2)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 343 19.7 2.9 (14.1–25.3)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 541 15.3 1.9 (11.5–19.1)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 186 14.1 2.6 (9.0–19.2)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 117 12.2 3.3 (5.8–18.6)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 252 28.9 3.4 (22.2–35.6)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 384 22.6 3.2 (16.3–28.9)
Macomb County, Michigan 95 17.0 4.0 (9.2–24.8)
Oakland County, Michigan 151 16.2 3.7 (8.9–23.5)
Wayne County, Michigan 195 17.6 3.0 (11.8–23.4)
Dakota County, Minnesota 53 8.7 4.2 (0.4–17.0)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 205 8.9 2.0 (4.9–12.9)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 94 17.1 4.1 (9.1–25.1)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 55 NA NA —
Hinds County, Mississippi 110 23.4 4.3 (14.9–31.9)
Rankin County, Mississippi 67 NA NA —
Jackson County, Missouri 151 21.7 3.5 (14.8–28.6)
St. Louis County, Missouri 88 11.3 4.8 (2.0–20.6)
St. Louis city, Missouri 161 NA NA —
Cascade County, Montana 130 13.2 3.7 (5.9–20.5)
Flathead County, Montana 131 18.6 4.0 (10.7–26.5)
Missoula County, Montana 112 15.7 3.7 (8.5–22.9)
Yellowstone County, Montana 104 17.9 4.1 (10.0–25.8)
Douglas County, Nebraska 217 14.3 2.7 (9.0–19.6)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 187 9.6 2.1 (5.5–13.7)
Sarpy County, Nebraska NA NA NA —
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 176 25.3 3.6 (18.2–32.4)
Clark County, Nevada 282 19.2 2.7 (13.9–24.5)
Washoe County, Nevada 254 15.9 2.4 (11.2–20.6)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 114 18.3 3.8 (10.9–25.7)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 112 27.0 4.6 (18.0–36.0)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 269 15.7 2.4 (11.1–20.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 153 16.9 3.7 (9.6–24.2)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 217 15.8 2.7 (10.5–21.1)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 125 26.0 4.2 (17.8–34.2)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 150 17.6 3.3 (11.2–24.0)
Bergen County, New Jersey 268 15.0 2.6 (9.9–20.1)
Burlington County, New Jersey 163 16.4 3.2 (10.2–22.6)
Camden County, New Jersey 193 17.0 2.7 (11.7–22.3)
Cape May County, New Jersey 201 20.9 3.2 (14.7–27.1)
Essex County, New Jersey 235 22.0 3.2 (15.7–28.3)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 146 19.9 3.9 (12.3–27.5)
Hudson County, New Jersey 199 22.6 3.9 (14.9–30.3)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 124 9.1 2.4 (4.3–13.9)
Mercer County, New Jersey 139 15.2 3.3 (8.8–21.6)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 194 21.5 3.7 (14.2–28.8)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 217 18.1 2.9 (12.5–23.7)
Morris County, New Jersey 200 12.6 2.6 (7.4–17.8)
Ocean County, New Jersey 284 19.0 2.5 (14.1–23.9)
Passaic County, New Jersey 239 15.7 3.3 (9.2–22.2)
Somerset County, New Jersey 140 9.9 2.7 (4.7–15.1)
Sussex County, New Jersey 135 14.4 3.1 (8.3–20.5)
Union County, New Jersey 130 12.0 3.8 (4.5–19.5)
Warren County, New Jersey 159 24.3 4.1 (16.2–32.4)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 279 16.5 2.5 (11.6–21.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 131 17.3 4.0 (9.4–25.2)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 86 NA NA —
San Juan County, New Mexico 88 NA NA —

TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 127 13.3 3.5 (6.4–20.2)
Kings County, New York 107 14.6 3.5 (7.8–21.4)
Nassau County, New York 97 12.6 3.9 (4.9–20.3)
New York County, New York 123 9.4 2.9 (3.7–15.1)
Queens County, New York 88 NA NA —
Suffolk County, New York 83 9.5 4.1 (1.4–17.6)
Westchester County, New York 71 11.8 4.5 (2.9–20.7)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 104 23.3 4.7 (14.1–32.5)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 93 NA NA —
Catawba County, North Carolina 113 21.2 4.2 (13.0–29.4)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 89 NA NA —
Durham County, North Carolina 79 7.8 3.2 (1.5–14.1)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 120 16.7 3.6 (9.7–23.7)
Gaston County, North Carolina 120 27.7 4.8 (18.3–37.1)
Guilford County, North Carolina 121 19.7 4.2 (11.5–27.9)
Johnston County, North Carolina 102 25.1 4.8 (15.7–34.5)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 177 22.1 3.9 (14.4–29.8)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 117 6.8 2.4 (2.1–11.5)
Orange County, North Carolina 76 NA NA —
Randolph County, North Carolina 107 27.3 4.9 (17.7–36.9)
Union County, North Carolina 85 20.1 4.6 (11.1–29.1)
Wake County, North Carolina 116 13.4 4.4 (4.8–22.0)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 93 15.2 3.9 (7.5–22.9)
Cass County, North Dakota 147 18.6 3.4 (11.8–25.4)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 108 NA NA —
Hamilton County, Ohio 103 9.8 4.6 (0.8–18.8)
Lorain County, Ohio 133 22.5 3.9 (14.9–30.1)
Lucas County, Ohio 153 20.5 4.2 (12.2–28.8)
Mahoning County, Ohio 259 18.3 2.7 (13.1–23.5)
Montgomery County, Ohio 230 27.1 4.6 (18.1–36.1)
Summit County, Ohio 195 25.4 4.3 (17.0–33.8)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 92 20.2 4.7 (11.0–29.4)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 344 23.6 2.6 (18.5–28.7)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 403 21.1 2.2 (16.7–25.5)
Clackamas County, Oregon 111 22.1 4.3 (13.6–30.6)
Lane County, Oregon 139 12.9 3.2 (6.6–19.2)
Multnomah County, Oregon 162 16.8 3.2 (10.5–23.1)
Washington County, Oregon 88 6.9 2.6 (1.8–12.0)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 144 19.6 3.5 (12.7–26.5)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 690 34.0 4.2 (25.8–42.2)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 741 23.7 4.1 (15.7–31.7)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 75 9.6 3.9 (2.0–17.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 407 21.0 4.2 (12.7–29.3)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 91 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 169 17.8 3.0 (11.9–23.7)
Newport County, Rhode Island 108 11.4 3.0 (5.5–17.3)
Providence County, Rhode Island 741 20.4 1.7 (17.1–23.7)
Washington County, Rhode Island 137 11.4 2.8 (5.9–16.9)
Aiken County, South Carolina 160 18.1 3.2 (11.8–24.4)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 215 9.0 2.0 (5.0–13.0)
Berkeley County, South Carolina NA NA NA —
Charleston County, South Carolina 141 16.3 3.6 (9.3–23.3)
Greenville County, South Carolina 130 20.5 4.1 (12.4–28.6)
Horry County, South Carolina 230 17.1 2.8 (11.6–22.6)
Lexington County, South Carolina 77 11.5 3.6 (4.4–18.6)
Richland County, South Carolina 84 13.7 4.1 (5.6–21.8)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 158 21.9 3.6 (14.9–28.9)
Pennington County, South Dakota 189 17.9 3.1 (11.9–23.9)
Davidson County, Tennessee 77 NA NA —
Shelby County, Tennessee 54 NA NA —
Bexar County, Texas 99 17.7 4.6 (8.6–26.8)
Dallas County, Texas 87 10.7 4.4 (2.1–19.3)
El Paso County, Texas 123 14.6 3.4 (7.9–21.3)
Harris County, Texas 67 NA NA —
Lubbock County, Texas 173 19.9 3.3 (13.5–26.3)
Tarrant County, Texas 98 NA NA —
Travis County, Texas 61 11.7 4.7 (2.5–20.9)
Davis County, Utah 71 9.7 3.4 (3.1–16.3)
Salt Lake County, Utah 313 11.6 1.9 (7.8–15.4)

TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah NA NA NA —
Tooele County, Utah 52 NA NA —
Utah County, Utah 90 15.2 4.0 (7.3–23.1)
Weber County, Utah 96 17.4 4.4 (8.7–26.1)
Chittenden County, Vermont 319 12.7 2.0 (8.8–16.6)
Franklin County, Vermont 111 NA NA —
Orange County, Vermont 110 28.8 4.8 (19.4–38.2)
Rutland County, Vermont 194 13.1 2.5 (8.2–18.0)
Washington County, Vermont 171 17.2 3.0 (11.4–23.0)
Windsor County, Vermont 194 16.4 2.7 (11.2–21.6)
Asotin County, Washington 114 23.6 4.3 (15.1–32.1)
Benton County, Washington 87 8.9 3.0 (3.0–14.8)
Chelan County, Washington 181 14.2 2.7 (8.9–19.5)
Clark County, Washington 348 16.5 2.1 (12.4–20.6)
Douglas County, Washington 150 15.2 2.9 (9.4–21.0)
Franklin County, Washington 65 NA NA —
King County, Washington 704 9.0 1.2 (6.7–11.3)
Kitsap County, Washington 221 19.3 2.9 (13.5–25.1)
Pierce County, Washington 376 16.5 2.0 (12.5–20.5)
Snohomish County, Washington 346 15.5 2.1 (11.4–19.6)
Spokane County, Washington 296 19.6 2.7 (14.4–24.8)
Thurston County, Washington 378 14.4 1.9 (10.6–18.2)
Yakima County, Washington 211 16.3 2.7 (10.9–21.7)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 129 37.8 4.8 (28.4–47.2)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 173 14.1 3.6 (7.1–21.1)
Laramie County, Wyoming 180 15.4 2.8 (10.0–20.8)
Natrona County, Wyoming 146 22.6 3.5 (15.7–29.5)
Median 16.4
Range 5.1–37.8
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 10

TABLE 10. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical, mental, or emotional
problems, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 3,281 24.8 1.0 (22.9–26.7)
Alaska 2,087 20.8 1.2 (18.5–23.1)
Arizona 4,797 18.6 0.9 (16.8–20.4)
Arkansas 5,557 22.9 0.7 (21.6–24.2)
California 5,699 19.7 0.7 (18.4–21.0)
Colorado 6,093 18.4 0.6 (17.3–19.5)
Connecticut 8,467 17.6 0.5 (16.6–18.6)
Delaware 3,998 20.9 0.9 (19.2–22.6)
District of Columbia 4,007 16.3 0.7 (14.9–17.7)
Florida 10,678 20.9 0.6 (19.8–22.0)
Georgia 7,676 18.2 0.6 (17.1–19.3)
Hawaii 6,537 14.2 0.5 (13.2–15.2)
Idaho 5,323 20.9 0.7 (19.6–22.2)
Illinois 5,165 17.1 0.6 (15.9–18.3)
Indiana 6,506 18.7 0.6 (17.6–19.8)
Iowa 5,417 16.9 0.6 (15.8–18.0)
Kansas 8,277 18.9 0.5 (17.9–19.9)
Kentucky 6,150 27.7 0.8 (26.1–29.3)
Louisiana 7,052 19.9 0.6 (18.8–21.0)
Maine 4,022 22.0 0.8 (20.5–23.5)
Maryland 8,867 17.8 0.5 (16.7–18.9)
Massachusetts 12,666 19.0 0.5 (18.0–20.0)
Michigan 5,636 22.1 0.7 (20.8–23.4)
Minnesota 4,250 20.2 0.7 (18.8–21.6)
Mississippi 6,013 23.7 0.7 (22.4–25.0)
Missouri 5,377 23.9 1.0 (22.0–25.8)
Montana 6,035 21.6 0.6 (20.3–22.9)
Nebraska 7,947 18.4 0.6 (17.3–19.5)
Nevada 3,568 20.2 1.0 (18.3–22.1)
New Hampshire 6,019 20.3 0.6 (19.1–21.5)
New Jersey 13,384 16.8 0.4 (16.0–17.6)
New Mexico 6,556 21.1 0.6 (19.8–22.4)
New York 5,902 17.5 0.6 (16.3–18.7)
North Carolina 15,598 20.1 0.4 (19.3–20.9)
North Dakota 4,757 15.3 0.6 (14.1–16.5)
Ohio 5,795 23.8 1.1 (21.6–26.0)
Oklahoma 7,007 25.6 0.6 (24.4–26.8)
Oregon 4,847 24.4 0.7 (23.0–25.8)
Pennsylvania 13,202 18.8 0.6 (17.6–20.0)
Rhode Island 4,502 19.2 0.7 (17.8–20.6)
South Carolina 8,976 20.1 0.5 (19.1–21.1)
South Dakota 6,627 19.0 0.6 (17.8–20.2)
Tennessee 4,407 19.4 0.8 (17.9–20.9)
Texas 6,821 19.2 0.8 (17.6–20.8)
Utah 5,191 19.1 0.7 (17.7–20.5)
Vermont 6,985 20.3 0.5 (19.2–21.4)
Virginia 5,401 19.3 0.8 (17.7–20.9)
Washington 23,631 24.1 0.4 (23.4–24.8)
West Virginia 3,786 27.3 0.8 (25.7–28.9)
Wisconsin 4,824 17.4 0.6 (16.1–18.7)
Wyoming 4,961 20.1 0.6 (18.9–21.3)
Puerto Rico 4,674 20.3 0.7 (19.0–21.6)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,217 10.1 0.6 (8.9–11.3)
Median 19.9
Range 10.1–27.7
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 11

TABLE 11. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical, mental, or emotional
problems, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United
States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 730 19.2 2.3 (14.7–23.7)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,820 21.0 1.2 (18.7–23.3)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 814 20.0 2.8 (14.6–25.4)
Asheville, North Carolina 533 23.3 2.3 (18.8–27.8)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,099 16.0 0.8 (14.4–17.6)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 537 19.9 2.2 (15.7–24.1)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 921 20.0 1.5 (17.0–23.0)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 531 17.2 1.8 (13.6–20.8)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,201 18.0 0.8 (16.4–19.6)
Barre, Vermont 725 21.6 1.8 (18.1–25.1)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,207 16.1 1.2 (13.7–18.5)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 1,733 16.4 1.1 (14.3–18.5)
Billings, Montana 506 22.1 2.0 (18.1–26.1)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 894 23.8 1.7 (20.4–27.2)
Bismarck, North Dakota 573 16.2 1.6 (13.0–19.4)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,320 21.5 1.3 (19.0–24.0)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 2,346 17.5 1.0 (15.5–19.5)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 899 26.2 1.8 (22.7–29.7)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,452 15.5 1.0 (13.5–17.5)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,038 17.9 1.0 (16.0–19.8)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,340 17.4 1.1 (15.3–19.5)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,773 19.1 1.2 (16.7–21.5)
Casper, Wyoming 608 22.1 1.8 (18.5–25.7)
Charleston, West Virginia 683 25.7 1.9 (22.0–29.4)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,046 19.8 1.4 (17.0–22.6)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,297 17.5 1.0 (15.6–19.4)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 711 18.9 1.6 (15.8–22.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,724 16.0 0.7 (14.6–17.4)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 986 21.3 2.4 (16.5–26.1)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 992 25.5 2.9 (19.9–31.1)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 788 19.8 1.6 (16.8–22.8)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,024 17.8 1.4 (15.1–20.5)
Concord, New Hampshire 639 20.7 1.9 (16.9–24.5)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 543 15.4 2.1 (11.2–19.6)
Dayton, Ohio 805 24.1 2.5 (19.2–29.0)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,841 18.0 0.8 (16.4–19.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 960 16.6 1.3 (14.1–19.1)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 837 20.4 1.6 (17.3–23.5)
Dover, Delaware 1,375 20.8 1.4 (18.1–23.5)
Durham, North Carolina 1,028 18.3 1.5 (15.3–21.3)
Edison, New Jersey§ 2,959 16.4 0.8 (14.9–17.9)
El Paso, Texas 536 16.0 1.8 (12.5–19.5)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 1,771 17.8 1.5 (14.8–20.8)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 532 24.9 2.1 (20.9–28.9)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 721 17.1 2.6 (11.9–22.3)
Farmington, New Mexico 542 21.3 2.3 (16.9–25.7)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 568 17.9 1.9 (14.3–21.5)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 756 18.7 1.8 (15.2–22.2)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 504 17.1 2.4 (12.3–21.9)
Great Falls, Montana 517 25.3 2.1 (21.1–29.5)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 946 20.3 1.6 (17.2–23.4)
Greenville, South Carolina 818 19.3 1.6 (16.2–22.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 616 19.5 1.9 (15.7–23.3)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,690 16.8 0.8 (15.2–18.4)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 651 22.9 2.2 (18.6–27.2)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,403 18.4 1.2 (16.0–20.8)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 705 15.6 1.6 (12.6–18.6)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,996 12.8 0.6 (11.5–14.1)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 552 23.0 2.8 (17.4–28.6)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 501 35.8 4.2 (27.6–44.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,087 16.6 0.9 (14.8–18.4)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,034 19.0 1.4 (16.3–21.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 695 21.5 2.2 (17.2–25.8)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,484 17.6 1.4 (14.9–20.3)
Kalispell, Montana 504 23.6 2.2 (19.3–27.9)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,283 20.3 0.9 (18.5–22.1)
Kapaa, Hawaii 654 14.8 1.7 (11.4–18.2)
Keene, New Hampshire 500 20.3 2.1 (16.2–24.4)

TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical,
mental, or emotional problems, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 678 22.4 2.1 (18.2–26.6)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 537 17.1 1.7 (13.8–20.4)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,218 20.1 1.3 (17.5–22.7)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,582 18.2 1.1 (16.0–20.4)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 604 28.8 2.4 (24.0–33.6)
Lincoln, Nebraska 774 16.6 1.5 (13.6–19.6)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,231 21.1 1.3 (18.5–23.7)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 766 19.1 1.7 (15.8–22.4)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 917 22.5 1.7 (19.2–25.8)
Lubbock, Texas 572 20.1 2.0 (16.2–24.0)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,444 18.4 1.1 (16.2–20.6)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 839 19.3 1.9 (15.5–23.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,163 16.5 1.1 (14.4–18.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,363 16.8 1.4 (14.1–19.5)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,468 19.5 0.9 (17.8–21.2)
Missoula, Montana 504 18.5 1.9 (14.9–22.1)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 701 24.3 1.9 (20.5–28.1)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 633 16.2 1.7 (12.9–19.5)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 691 14.6 1.7 (11.4–17.8)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,343 16.8 0.9 (15.0–18.6)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,058 19.0 1.1 (16.8–21.2)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,466 19.1 1.3 (16.5–21.7)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 4,739 15.3 0.8 (13.8–16.8)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 597 19.2 1.8 (15.7–22.7)
Ocean City, New Jersey 550 21.5 2.1 (17.4–25.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 846 20.9 1.7 (17.5–24.3)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,180 24.6 1.1 (22.5–26.7)
Olympia, Washington 1,538 23.9 1.3 (21.4–26.4)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,744 18.1 1.0 (16.1–20.1)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 809 20.0 1.6 (16.8–23.2)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 2,625 19.3 1.3 (16.7–21.9)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,316 17.0 1.3 (14.4–19.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,646 18.5 1.4 (15.8–21.2)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,287 20.0 1.3 (17.4–22.6)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,782 22.4 0.9 (20.6–24.2)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,720 19.0 0.6 (17.8–20.2)
Provo-Orem, Utah 575 18.8 2.2 (14.4–23.2)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,201 16.7 1.4 (14.0–19.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 968 18.9 1.4 (16.2–21.6)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,242 18.3 1.2 (16.0–20.6)
Richmond, Virginia 866 17.0 1.4 (14.2–19.8)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 704 20.0 1.7 (16.6–23.4)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,655 20.3 1.2 (17.9–22.7)
Rutland, Vermont 691 23.3 1.8 (19.8–26.8)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,600 21.1 1.8 (17.6–24.6)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,196 18.1 1.0 (16.1–20.1)
San Antonio, Texas 538 20.2 2.2 (16.0–24.4)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 547 16.5 1.7 (13.1–19.9)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 749 18.0 1.7 (14.6–21.4)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 556 19.7 2.0 (15.9–23.5)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 569 22.7 2.1 (18.6–26.8)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,778 18.8 1.7 (15.4–22.2)
Seaford, Delaware 1,314 21.8 1.5 (18.9–24.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,786 21.1 0.7 (19.7–22.5)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 639 17.8 1.6 (14.7–20.9)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 903 17.7 1.4 (15.0–20.4)
Spokane, Washington 1,190 27.7 1.6 (24.6–30.8)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,637 21.8 1.5 (18.9–24.7)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,613 25.4 1.3 (22.9–27.9)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,089 23.8 1.5 (20.8–26.8)
Toledo, Ohio 789 18.5 2.3 (14.0–23.0)
Topeka, Kansas 755 19.9 1.6 (16.7–23.1)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 507 17.0 1.9 (13.2–20.8)
Tucson, Arizona 786 21.8 1.9 (18.1–25.5)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,878 23.7 1.2 (21.3–26.1)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,122 18.4 1.7 (15.1–21.7)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,214 21.2 1.4 (18.5–23.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia§ 6,237 16.5 1.3 (14.0–19.0)

TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical,
mental, or emotional problems, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,043 22.0 1.5 (19.0–25.0)
Wichita, Kansas 1,653 19.2 1.1 (17.1–21.3)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,810 20.0 1.1 (17.8–22.2)
Wilmington, North Carolina 676 19.1 1.8 (15.5–22.7)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 614 20.3 1.8 (16.7–23.9)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,736 20.0 1.5 (17.1–22.9)
Yakima, Washington 746 22.2 1.7 (18.9–25.5)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 923 23.6 3.5 (16.8–30.4)
Yuma, Arizona 513 15.8 1.7 (12.4–19.2)
Median 19.3
Range 12.8–35.8
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 12

TABLE 12. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical, mental or emotional
problems, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 540 20.6 2.0 (16.7–24.5)
Maricopa County, Arizona 881 16.9 1.4 (14.2–19.6)
Pima County, Arizona 786 21.8 1.9 (18.1–25.5)
Pinal County, Arizona 435 18.7 2.5 (13.9–23.5)
Yuma County, Arizona 513 15.8 1.7 (12.4–19.2)
Benton County, Arkansas 378 19.8 2.2 (15.5–24.1)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 701 21.5 1.8 (18.0–25.0)
Washington County, Arkansas 323 16.6 2.4 (12.0–21.2)
Alameda County, California 274 20.4 2.9 (14.8–26.0)
Los Angeles County, California 766 19.1 1.7 (15.8–22.4)
Riverside County, California 357 20.3 2.4 (15.7–24.9)
San Bernardino County, California 347 19.4 2.4 (14.8–24.0)
San Diego County, California 547 16.5 1.7 (13.1–19.9)
Adams County, Colorado 434 19.4 2.1 (15.4–23.4)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 634 18.6 1.7 (15.2–22.0)
Denver County, Colorado 589 19.5 1.9 (15.8–23.2)
Douglas County, Colorado 298 12.0 2.0 (8.1–15.9)
El Paso County, Colorado 758 19.7 1.6 (16.6–22.8)
Jefferson County, Colorado 730 19.6 1.7 (16.3–22.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,452 15.5 1.0 (13.5–17.5)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,960 17.4 1.0 (15.5–19.3)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 364 16.6 2.1 (12.4–20.8)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,058 19.0 1.1 (16.8–21.2)
New London County, Connecticut 597 19.2 1.8 (15.7–22.7)
Tolland County, Connecticut 366 14.6 2.1 (10.4–18.8)
Kent County, Delaware 1,375 20.8 1.4 (18.1–23.5)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,309 20.5 1.3 (18.0–23.0)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,314 21.8 1.5 (18.9–24.7)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 4,007 16.3 0.7 (14.9–17.7)
Broward County, Florida 728 16.2 1.6 (13.1–19.3)
Duval County, Florida 296 20.1 2.9 (14.3–25.9)
Hillsborough County, Florida 479 19.3 2.1 (15.1–23.5)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 921 13.8 1.4 (11.0–16.6)
Orange County, Florida 434 21.8 2.3 (17.2–26.4)
Palm Beach County, Florida 514 20.6 2.3 (16.0–25.2)
Pinellas County, Florida 346 27.1 2.8 (21.7–32.5)
Clayton County, Georgia 377 21.3 3.2 (15.0–27.6)
Cobb County, Georgia 387 14.3 2.0 (10.3–18.3)
DeKalb County, Georgia 436 17.7 2.5 (12.8–22.6)
Fulton County, Georgia 423 12.7 1.7 (9.3–16.1)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 359 12.0 1.7 (8.6–15.4)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,403 18.4 1.2 (16.0–20.8)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,996 12.8 0.6 (11.5–14.1)
Kauai County, Hawaii 654 14.8 1.7 (11.4–18.2)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,484 17.6 1.4 (14.9–20.3)
Ada County, Idaho 652 21.2 1.8 (17.6–24.8)
Canyon County, Idaho 523 22.1 2.0 (18.3–25.9)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 258 28.6 3.1 (22.5–34.7)
Cook County, Illinois 1,686 16.4 1.1 (14.3–18.5)
DuPage County, Illinois 372 13.6 1.9 (9.9–17.3)
Lake County, Illinois 261 16.6 2.5 (11.8–21.4)
Lake County, Indiana 521 16.8 1.8 (13.2–20.4)
Marion County, Indiana 1,336 17.3 1.2 (15.0–19.6)
Polk County, Iowa 727 17.0 1.5 (14.1–19.9)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,440 15.9 1.2 (13.6–18.2)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,242 19.3 1.2 (16.9–21.7)
Shawnee County, Kansas 550 19.6 1.8 (16.1–23.1)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 344 26.0 2.7 (20.7–31.3)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 468 25.2 2.5 (20.3–30.1)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 413 15.7 1.9 (12.0–19.4)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 688 15.0 1.6 (11.9–18.1)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 638 19.0 1.8 (15.5–22.5)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 276 22.5 3.3 (16.0–29.0)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 394 18.4 2.3 (13.9–22.9)
Cumberland County, Maine 668 19.6 1.8 (16.1–23.1)
York County, Maine 469 20.9 2.1 (16.8–25.0)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 583 20.3 2.1 (16.2–24.4)
Baltimore County, Maryland 948 19.6 1.6 (16.6–22.6)
Carroll County, Maryland 255 17.2 2.6 (12.1–22.3)

TABLE 12. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical, mental
or emotional problems, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 320 19.9 2.6 (14.9–24.9)
Charles County, Maryland 307 22.1 2.7 (16.9–27.3)
Frederick County, Maryland 585 14.9 1.6 (11.7–18.1)
Harford County, Maryland 291 15.0 2.3 (10.4–19.6)
Howard County, Maryland 322 13.9 2.3 (9.4–18.4)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,148 16.8 1.3 (14.3–19.3)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 657 16.1 1.7 (12.7–19.5)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 275 20.1 3.0 (14.3–25.9)
Washington County, Maryland 404 20.2 2.4 (15.4–25.0)
Baltimore city, Maryland 527 19.8 2.0 (15.9–23.7)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,218 18.4 1.3 (15.8–21.0)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,771 18.3 1.7 (15.0–21.6)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,323 22.3 1.8 (18.8–25.8)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,340 17.2 1.1 (15.1–19.3)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 632 17.0 1.6 (13.8–20.2)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 522 18.0 2.0 (14.1–21.9)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,192 17.9 1.5 (14.9–20.9)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,736 20.0 1.5 (17.1–22.9)
Macomb County, Michigan 380 21.5 2.3 (16.9–26.1)
Oakland County, Michigan 593 19.2 1.9 (15.5–22.9)
Wayne County, Michigan 837 20.4 1.6 (17.3–23.5)
Dakota County, Minnesota 294 17.2 2.4 (12.4–22.0)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 884 20.6 1.5 (17.7–23.5)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 414 21.2 2.2 (16.9–25.5)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 256 16.7 2.5 (11.7–21.7)
Hinds County, Mississippi 460 17.1 1.9 (13.4–20.8)
Rankin County, Mississippi 273 19.4 2.5 (14.4–24.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 524 23.6 2.2 (19.4–27.8)
St. Louis County, Missouri 351 20.6 3.2 (14.4–26.8)
St. Louis city, Missouri 600 22.2 2.8 (16.6–27.8)
Cascade County, Montana 517 25.3 2.1 (21.1–29.5)
Flathead County, Montana 504 23.6 2.2 (19.3–27.9)
Missoula County, Montana 504 18.5 1.9 (14.9–22.1)
Yellowstone County, Montana 461 22.0 2.1 (17.8–26.2)
Douglas County, Nebraska 980 17.1 1.3 (14.6–19.6)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 720 17.2 1.7 (14.0–20.4)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 293 18.9 2.6 (13.8–24.0)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 555 22.7 2.1 (18.5–26.9)
Clark County, Nevada 1,218 20.1 1.3 (17.5–22.7)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,225 18.4 1.2 (16.0–20.8)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 500 20.3 2.1 (16.2–24.4)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 469 16.5 1.8 (13.0–20.0)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,444 18.4 1.1 (16.2–20.6)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 639 20.7 1.9 (16.9–24.5)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,024 18.2 1.4 (15.5–20.9)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 631 24.3 2.0 (20.5–28.1)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 537 19.9 2.2 (15.7–24.1)
Bergen County, New Jersey 962 14.0 1.2 (11.7–16.3)
Burlington County, New Jersey 549 19.1 2.1 (15.0–23.2)
Camden County, New Jersey 644 20.6 2.1 (16.5–24.7)
Cape May County, New Jersey 550 21.5 2.1 (17.4–25.6)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,041 17.7 1.5 (14.8–20.6)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 580 17.3 1.9 (13.7–20.9)
Hudson County, New Jersey 846 15.5 1.6 (12.3–18.7)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 520 15.5 1.8 (11.9–19.1)
Mercer County, New Jersey 507 17.0 1.9 (13.2–20.8)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 826 15.9 1.4 (13.1–18.7)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 760 15.2 1.4 (12.5–17.9)
Morris County, New Jersey 706 17.5 1.9 (13.7–21.3)
Ocean County, New Jersey 795 19.6 1.5 (16.6–22.6)
Passaic County, New Jersey 892 15.6 1.8 (12.1–19.1)
Somerset County, New Jersey 578 13.3 1.5 (10.3–16.3)
Sussex County, New Jersey 557 17.6 1.8 (14.0–21.2)
Union County, New Jersey 490 15.7 1.9 (12.0–19.4)
Warren County, New Jersey 515 18.0 2.1 (13.9–22.1)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,160 21.4 1.4 (18.7–24.1)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 537 17.1 1.7 (13.8–20.4)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 368 20.0 2.7 (14.7–25.3)
San Juan County, New Mexico 542 21.3 2.3 (16.9–25.7)

TABLE 12. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical, mental
or emotional problems, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 556 19.7 2.0 (15.9–23.5)
Kings County, New York 467 14.7 1.7 (11.3–18.1)
Nassau County, New York 346 12.6 2.2 (8.2–17.0)
New York County, New York 465 14.4 1.8 (10.9–17.9)
Queens County, New York 421 14.4 2.1 (10.2–18.6)
Suffolk County, New York 345 16.2 2.3 (11.7–20.7)
Westchester County, New York 259 16.3 2.7 (10.9–21.7)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 357 20.9 2.2 (16.5–25.3)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 386 21.2 2.6 (16.1–26.3)
Catawba County, North Carolina 400 18.2 2.4 (13.4–23.0)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 445 18.5 2.1 (14.4–22.6)
Durham County, North Carolina 399 17.4 2.1 (13.3–21.5)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 421 18.6 2.3 (14.2–23.0)
Gaston County, North Carolina 389 24.1 2.5 (19.1–29.1)
Guilford County, North Carolina 444 18.8 2.1 (14.7–22.9)
Johnston County, North Carolina 450 20.1 2.2 (15.9–24.3)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 832 15.0 1.5 (12.0–18.0)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 393 16.4 2.2 (12.1–20.7)
Orange County, North Carolina 365 17.6 2.3 (13.1–22.1)
Randolph County, North Carolina 389 23.2 2.4 (18.4–28.0)
Union County, North Carolina 392 13.7 1.8 (10.1–17.3)
Wake County, North Carolina 652 15.5 1.7 (12.2–18.8)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 407 15.2 1.9 (11.4–19.0)
Cass County, North Dakota 673 13.8 1.4 (11.1–16.5)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 418 28.5 4.1 (20.5–36.5)
Hamilton County, Ohio 377 24.4 4.4 (15.9–32.9)
Lorain County, Ohio 489 20.5 4.6 (11.5–29.5)
Lucas County, Ohio 728 23.1 2.0 (19.3–26.9)
Mahoning County, Ohio 829 21.6 2.0 (17.7–25.5)
Montgomery County, Ohio 751 25.3 2.3 (20.8–29.8)
Summit County, Ohio 694 22.1 2.4 (17.5–26.7)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 377 24.3 2.5 (19.5–29.1)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,285 23.9 1.4 (21.2–26.6)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,348 21.7 1.3 (19.1–24.3)
Clackamas County, Oregon 452 18.4 2.1 (14.3–22.5)
Lane County, Oregon 532 24.9 2.1 (20.9–28.9)
Multnomah County, Oregon 770 24.3 1.7 (20.9–27.7)
Washington County, Oregon 501 21.1 2.2 (16.7–25.5)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 513 17.4 1.9 (13.7–21.1)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,494 20.8 1.5 (17.9–23.7)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,622 18.8 1.2 (16.4–21.2)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 307 18.9 2.5 (14.1–23.7)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,757 20.5 2.1 (16.4–24.6)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 281 17.4 3.1 (11.3–23.5)
Kent County, Rhode Island 649 21.0 1.8 (17.4–24.6)
Newport County, Rhode Island 368 17.2 2.4 (12.5–21.9)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,775 20.0 0.9 (18.2–21.8)
Washington County, Rhode Island 517 17.1 1.8 (13.5–20.7)
Aiken County, South Carolina 534 21.1 2.0 (17.2–25.0)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 635 15.8 1.7 (12.4–19.2)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 259 24.4 3.1 (18.4–30.4)
Charleston County, South Carolina 574 17.9 1.9 (14.1–21.7)
Greenville County, South Carolina 512 18.4 1.9 (14.7–22.1)
Horry County, South Carolina 701 24.3 1.9 (20.5–28.1)
Lexington County, South Carolina 319 20.1 2.4 (15.4–24.8)
Richland County, South Carolina 442 15.9 2.0 (11.9–19.9)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 663 18.5 1.7 (15.2–21.8)
Pennington County, South Dakota 756 20.0 1.6 (16.8–23.2)
Davidson County, Tennessee 277 16.2 2.4 (11.5–20.9)
Shelby County, Tennessee 295 22.8 3.1 (16.7–28.9)
Bexar County, Texas 403 18.8 2.2 (14.4–23.2)
Dallas County, Texas 390 10.9 1.6 (7.8–14.0)
El Paso County, Texas 536 16.0 1.8 (12.5–19.5)
Harris County, Texas 385 20.7 3.4 (14.1–27.3)
Lubbock County, Texas 557 19.7 2.0 (15.8–23.6)
Tarrant County, Texas 451 13.8 2.4 (9.0–18.6)
Travis County, Texas 315 17.7 2.5 (12.8–22.6)
Davis County, Utah 415 20.3 2.2 (16.0–24.6)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,672 18.2 1.1 (16.1–20.3)

TABLE 12. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported limited activities because of physical, mental
or emotional problems, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 253 15.5 2.5 (10.6–20.4)
Tooele County, Utah 271 18.6 2.5 (13.8–23.4)
Utah County, Utah 546 18.9 2.3 (14.4–23.4)
Weber County, Utah 417 20.5 2.2 (16.1–24.9)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,484 17.4 1.1 (15.2–19.6)
Franklin County, Vermont 457 19.5 2.1 (15.5–23.5)
Orange County, Vermont 379 21.7 2.4 (17.1–26.3)
Rutland County, Vermont 691 23.3 1.8 (19.8–26.8)
Washington County, Vermont 725 21.6 1.8 (18.1–25.1)
Windsor County, Vermont 734 18.7 1.5 (15.7–21.7)
Asotin County, Washington 346 28.3 2.8 (22.8–33.8)
Benton County, Washington 364 22.8 2.6 (17.7–27.9)
Chelan County, Washington 540 21.3 2.0 (17.4–25.2)
Clark County, Washington 1,552 24.0 1.3 (21.4–26.6)
Douglas County, Washington 503 22.2 2.2 (18.0–26.4)
Franklin County, Washington 314 20.7 2.7 (15.4–26.0)
King County, Washington 3,240 20.8 0.8 (19.2–22.4)
Kitsap County, Washington 899 26.2 1.8 (22.7–29.7)
Pierce County, Washington 1,613 25.8 1.3 (23.3–28.3)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,546 24.7 1.3 (22.2–27.2)
Spokane County, Washington 1,190 27.7 1.6 (24.6–30.8)
Thurston County, Washington 1,538 23.9 1.3 (21.4–26.4)
Yakima County, Washington 746 22.2 1.7 (18.9–25.5)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 445 25.1 2.3 (20.7–29.5)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 985 18.1 1.8 (14.5–21.7)
Laramie County, Wyoming 711 18.9 1.6 (15.8–22.0)
Natrona County, Wyoming 608 22.1 1.8 (18.5–25.7)
Median 19.1
Range 10.9–28.6
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 13

TABLE 13. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12
months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 3,237 73.5 1.1 (71.3–75.7)
Alaska 2,058 58.7 1.5 (55.7–61.7)
Arizona 4,757 65.5 1.4 (62.7–68.3)
Arkansas 5,537 58.9 0.9 (57.2–60.6)
California 5,689 62.9 0.9 (61.2–64.6)
Colorado 6,028 60.3 0.8 (58.8–61.8)
Connecticut 8,406 70.8 0.7 (69.4–72.2)
Delaware 3,983 75.8 1.0 (73.8–77.8)
District of Columbia 3,987 77.3 0.9 (75.6–79.0)
Florida 10,591 73.2 0.7 (71.9–74.5)
Georgia 7,612 71.1 0.8 (69.6–72.6)
Hawaii 6,485 66.7 0.9 (65.0–68.4)
Idaho 5,302 54.1 0.9 (52.3–55.9)
Illinois 5,131 65.6 0.9 (63.8–67.4)
Indiana 6,481 61.4 0.8 (59.9–62.9)
Iowa 5,375 69.4 0.8 (67.8–71.0)
Kansas 8,142 65.4 0.7 (64.0–66.8)
Kentucky 5,843 66.9 1.0 (64.9–68.9)
Louisiana 6,923 73.0 0.7 (71.6–74.4)
Maine 4,014 70.9 0.9 (69.1–72.7)
Maryland 8,809 73.2 0.7 (71.8–74.6)
Massachusetts 12,606 75.4 0.7 (74.1–76.7)
Michigan 5,596 68.4 0.8 (66.8–70.0)
Minnesota 4,239 72.8 0.9 (71.1–74.5)
Mississippi 5,923 67.0 0.8 (65.4–68.6)
Missouri 5,335 62.6 1.1 (60.4–64.8)
Montana 5,965 63.2 0.9 (61.5–64.9)
Nebraska 7,803 62.9 0.9 (61.2–64.6)
Nevada 3,533 61.5 1.3 (59.0–64.0)
New Hampshire 5,995 73.4 0.7 (71.9–74.9)
New Jersey 13,266 72.4 0.6 (71.2–73.6)
New Mexico 6,504 60.1 0.9 (58.4–61.8)
New York 5,891 70.4 0.8 (68.7–72.1)
North Carolina 15,453 71.0 0.6 (69.9–72.1)
North Dakota 4,742 62.2 1.0 (60.3–64.1)
Ohio 5,730 65.0 1.3 (62.4–67.6)
Oklahoma 6,871 56.7 0.8 (55.2–58.2)
Oregon 4,781 59.9 0.9 (58.1–61.7)
Pennsylvania 13,192 67.4 0.9 (65.7–69.1)
Rhode Island 4,489 80.3 0.9 (78.6–82.0)
South Carolina 8,855 64.6 0.7 (63.2–66.0)
South Dakota 6,568 66.0 0.8 (64.3–67.7)
Tennessee 4,378 75.7 1.1 (73.6–77.8)
Texas 6,760 62.0 1.1 (59.8–64.2)
Utah 5,145 53.3 1.0 (51.3–55.3)
Vermont 6,977 63.9 0.7 (62.5–65.3)
Virginia 5,326 65.6 1.1 (63.5–67.7)
Washington 23,378 60.7 0.5 (59.7–61.7)
West Virginia 3,759 73.6 0.9 (71.8–75.4)
Wisconsin 4,801 65.9 0.9 (64.1–67.7)
Wyoming 4,946 56.9 0.9 (55.2–58.6)
Puerto Rico 4,566 75.4 0.8 (73.7–77.1)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,212 64.3 1.1 (62.2–66.4)
Median 65.9
Range 53.3–80.3
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 14

TABLE 14. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12
months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States,
2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 722 63.2 3.1 (57.1–69.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,802 61.3 1.6 (58.2–64.4)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 810 69.7 3.4 (63.1–76.3)
Asheville, North Carolina 527 69.4 2.8 (64.0–74.8)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,086 71.9 1.2 (69.6–74.2)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 533 71.9 3.2 (65.7–78.1)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 912 70.2 2.0 (66.2–74.2)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 526 67.4 2.6 (62.2–72.6)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,186 74.6 1.0 (72.6–76.6)
Barre, Vermont 723 63.7 2.3 (59.2–68.2)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,178 72.8 1.7 (69.5–76.1)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 1,723 71.4 1.5 (68.4–74.4)
Billings, Montana 496 64.5 2.6 (59.4–69.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 885 73.9 2.1 (69.9–77.9)
Bismarck, North Dakota 573 59.2 2.5 (54.3–64.1)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,316 55.2 1.7 (51.9–58.5)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 2,343 74.3 1.5 (71.4–77.2)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 899 63.5 2.1 (59.4–67.6)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,439 68.8 1.4 (66.0–71.6)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,038 63.0 1.4 (60.3–65.7)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,326 76.1 1.4 (73.4–78.8)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,765 73.4 1.5 (70.5–76.3)
Casper, Wyoming 606 61.5 2.3 (57.0–66.0)
Charleston, West Virginia 682 75.2 2.1 (71.0–79.4)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,033 66.6 1.9 (62.8–70.4)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,278 68.5 1.4 (65.8–71.2)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 713 63.1 2.2 (58.7–67.5)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,703 66.1 1.1 (64.0–68.2)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 957 64.0 3.4 (57.3–70.7)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 984 69.7 3.0 (63.8–75.6)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 779 60.5 2.1 (56.3–64.7)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,013 67.8 1.9 (64.1–71.5)
Concord, New Hampshire 635 76.7 2.2 (72.4–81.0)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 536 66.4 3.1 (60.3–72.5)
Dayton, Ohio 798 66.2 3.0 (60.4–72.0)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,808 62.3 1.1 (60.1–64.5)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 951 71.3 1.7 (67.9–74.7)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 830 73.3 2.1 (69.3–77.3)
Dover, Delaware 1,367 78.3 1.5 (75.4–81.2)
Durham, North Carolina 1,020 72.0 2.1 (68.0–76.0)
Edison, New Jersey§ 2,927 71.6 1.2 (69.3–73.9)
El Paso, Texas 530 62.6 2.7 (57.4–67.8)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 1,767 76.9 1.7 (73.5–80.3)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 529 55.4 2.6 (50.3–60.5)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 723 69.7 2.9 (64.0–75.4)
Farmington, New Mexico 539 53.2 2.9 (47.6–58.8)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 561 70.4 2.5 (65.4–75.4)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 754 52.9 2.7 (47.5–58.3)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 496 57.1 3.6 (50.0–64.2)
Great Falls, Montana 518 65.7 2.6 (60.7–70.7)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 936 69.8 2.2 (65.5–74.1)
Greenville, South Carolina 809 59.8 2.3 (55.4–64.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 609 72.8 2.8 (67.4–78.2)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,662 71.9 1.2 (69.6–74.2)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 646 70.0 2.7 (64.7–75.3)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,390 64.9 1.7 (61.7–68.1)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 691 64.9 2.6 (59.9–69.9)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,981 67.7 1.1 (65.5–69.9)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 549 59.9 3.6 (52.9–66.9)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 492 62.8 4.2 (54.6–71.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,087 63.7 1.3 (61.1–66.3)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,020 69.6 1.8 (66.1–73.1)
Jacksonville, Florida 693 70.0 2.6 (64.9–75.1)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,464 62.7 1.8 (59.2–66.2)
Kalispell, Montana 497 61.2 2.8 (55.8–66.6)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,253 63.6 1.3 (61.1–66.1)
Kapaa, Hawaii 650 63.5 2.4 (58.8–68.2)
Keene, New Hampshire 495 68.4 2.9 (62.8–74.0)

TABLE 14. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the
preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 660 55.9 2.6 (50.7–61.1)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 531 56.1 2.7 (50.8–61.4)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,208 63.2 1.7 (59.9–66.5)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,581 66.8 1.7 (63.4–70.2)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 602 55.5 2.7 (50.2–60.8)
Lincoln, Nebraska 767 59.6 2.4 (54.9–64.3)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,222 63.3 1.8 (59.7–66.9)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 765 65.1 2.2 (60.8–69.4)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 890 66.1 2.1 (61.9–70.3)
Lubbock, Texas 570 59.5 2.9 (53.9–65.1)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,434 75.0 1.4 (72.3–77.7)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 832 75.5 2.5 (70.5–80.5)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,139 75.8 1.3 (73.3–78.3)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,360 67.1 2.0 (63.1–71.1)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,461 72.1 1.1 (69.9–74.3)
Missoula, Montana 500 58.4 2.9 (52.8–64.0)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 699 60.1 2.5 (55.2–65.0)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 625 74.1 2.4 (69.4–78.8)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 686 73.9 2.2 (69.6–78.2)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,315 70.7 1.3 (68.1–73.3)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,052 70.9 1.5 (68.0–73.8)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,445 73.3 1.6 (70.2–76.4)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 4,704 71.8 1.1 (69.6–74.0)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 593 69.8 2.4 (65.1–74.5)
Ocean City, New Jersey 542 76.4 2.6 (71.2–81.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 843 54.5 2.2 (50.3–58.7)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,140 54.6 1.3 (52.0–57.2)
Olympia, Washington 1,534 58.6 1.6 (55.4–61.8)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,726 65.8 1.5 (62.8–68.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 804 75.9 2.0 (72.0–79.8)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 2,625 67.5 1.9 (63.7–71.3)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,303 65.6 2.0 (61.6–69.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,648 66.9 1.9 (63.3–70.5)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,291 70.6 1.7 (67.2–74.0)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,737 58.7 1.2 (56.4–61.0)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,692 79.7 0.8 (78.1–81.3)
Provo-Orem, Utah 571 46.0 2.9 (40.2–51.8)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,192 70.7 2.0 (66.8–74.6)
Rapid City, South Dakota 960 65.1 1.9 (61.4–68.8)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,229 56.0 1.7 (52.6–59.4)
Richmond, Virginia 850 64.7 2.3 (60.1–69.3)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 704 67.0 2.2 (62.7–71.3)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,651 73.2 1.4 (70.4–76.0)
Rutland, Vermont 690 68.4 2.2 (64.2–72.6)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,598 67.4 2.1 (63.3–71.5)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,177 55.7 1.4 (52.9–58.5)
San Antonio, Texas 536 64.4 3.0 (58.5–70.3)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 544 62.4 2.7 (57.1–67.7)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 749 63.4 2.4 (58.6–68.2)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 551 63.7 2.7 (58.4–69.0)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 546 61.2 2.7 (55.9–66.5)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,781 70.6 2.4 (65.8–75.4)
Seaford, Delaware 1,314 78.4 1.6 (75.3–81.5)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,746 60.7 0.9 (58.8–62.6)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 625 72.4 2.4 (67.7–77.1)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 895 68.3 1.9 (64.5–72.1)
Spokane, Washington 1,181 59.6 2.0 (55.7–63.5)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,628 75.5 2.0 (71.6–79.4)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,599 62.8 1.6 (59.6–66.0)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,083 74.2 1.8 (70.8–77.6)
Toledo, Ohio 778 62.0 4.1 (54.0–70.0)
Topeka, Kansas 745 66.5 2.1 (62.3–70.7)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 500 72.2 2.6 (67.0–77.4)
Tucson, Arizona 774 63.4 2.6 (58.2–68.6)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,844 57.8 1.5 (54.8–60.8)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,108 68.9 2.3 (64.5–73.3)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,211 69.4 1.7 (66.1–72.7)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia§ 6,198 67.9 2.2 (63.7–72.1)

TABLE 14. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the
preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,029 58.6 2.1 (54.5–62.7)
Wichita, Kansas 1,621 65.6 1.6 (62.5–68.7)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,800 73.3 1.4 (70.6–76.0)
Wilmington, North Carolina 670 72.7 2.7 (67.3–78.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 603 72.6 2.4 (68.0–77.2)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,722 73.3 1.8 (69.8–76.8)
Yakima, Washington 739 60.4 2.3 (55.8–65.0)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 908 66.6 4.3 (58.1–75.1)
Yuma, Arizona 505 70.4 2.6 (65.3–75.5)
Median 66.9
Range 46.0–79.7
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 15

TABLE 15. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12
months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 536 75.7 2.4 (70.9–80.5)
Maricopa County, Arizona 871 65.6 2.2 (61.4–69.8)
Pima County, Arizona 774 63.4 2.6 (58.2–68.6)
Pinal County, Arizona 432 65.2 4.1 (57.1–73.3)
Yuma County, Arizona 505 70.4 2.6 (65.3–75.5)
Benton County, Arkansas 380 54.8 3.1 (48.8–60.8)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 697 66.6 2.2 (62.2–71.0)
Washington County, Arkansas 320 52.3 3.5 (45.5–59.1)
Alameda County, California 275 63.2 3.6 (56.2–70.2)
Los Angeles County, California 765 65.1 2.2 (60.8–69.4)
Riverside County, California 357 69.2 3.1 (63.2–75.2)
San Bernardino County, California 347 64.4 3.1 (58.3–70.5)
San Diego County, California 544 62.4 2.7 (57.1–67.7)
Adams County, Colorado 428 57.7 2.8 (52.2–63.2)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 627 65.6 2.2 (61.2–70.0)
Denver County, Colorado 584 59.2 2.6 (54.1–64.3)
Douglas County, Colorado 296 64.0 3.2 (57.7–70.3)
El Paso County, Colorado 750 61.4 2.2 (57.2–65.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 721 61.7 2.2 (57.5–65.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,439 68.8 1.4 (66.0–71.6)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,939 72.1 1.3 (69.5–74.7)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 360 73.4 2.9 (67.7–79.1)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,052 70.9 1.5 (68.0–73.8)
New London County, Connecticut 593 69.8 2.4 (65.1–74.5)
Tolland County, Connecticut 363 68.0 3.5 (61.2–74.8)
Kent County, Delaware 1,367 78.3 1.5 (75.4–81.2)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,302 74.1 1.5 (71.2–77.0)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,314 78.4 1.6 (75.3–81.5)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,987 77.3 0.9 (75.6–79.0)
Broward County, Florida 723 75.8 2.0 (71.9–79.7)
Duval County, Florida 297 68.8 3.6 (61.8–75.8)
Hillsborough County, Florida 480 72.4 2.7 (67.2–77.6)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 906 76.0 1.9 (72.3–79.7)
Orange County, Florida 428 77.7 2.7 (72.5–82.9)
Palm Beach County, Florida 510 76.6 2.4 (71.9–81.3)
Pinellas County, Florida 342 77.7 2.9 (72.0–83.4)
Clayton County, Georgia 377 68.6 3.8 (61.2–76.0)
Cobb County, Georgia 384 66.6 3.1 (60.6–72.6)
DeKalb County, Georgia 435 71.2 3.5 (64.4–78.0)
Fulton County, Georgia 422 75.0 3.1 (68.9–81.1)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 356 70.2 3.1 (64.1–76.3)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,390 64.9 1.7 (61.7–68.1)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,981 67.7 1.1 (65.5–69.9)
Kauai County, Hawaii 650 63.5 2.4 (58.8–68.2)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,464 62.7 1.8 (59.2–66.2)
Ada County, Idaho 652 57.9 2.4 (53.1–62.7)
Canyon County, Idaho 521 51.7 2.6 (46.7–56.7)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 255 53.0 3.5 (46.1–59.9)
Cook County, Illinois 1,674 67.8 1.5 (64.8–70.8)
DuPage County, Illinois 368 61.7 3.1 (55.5–67.9)
Lake County, Illinois 262 63.2 3.8 (55.8–70.6)
Lake County, Indiana 522 59.0 2.9 (53.3–64.7)
Marion County, Indiana 1,339 61.8 1.7 (58.5–65.1)
Polk County, Iowa 723 71.1 2.0 (67.2–75.0)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,430 68.4 1.5 (65.4–71.4)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,220 65.4 1.8 (61.9–68.9)
Shawnee County, Kansas 545 68.3 2.5 (63.4–73.2)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 341 69.8 3.2 (63.6–76.0)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 457 71.0 2.8 (65.5–76.5)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 399 73.6 2.9 (67.9–79.3)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 673 69.2 2.3 (64.6–73.8)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 629 72.6 2.4 (68.0–77.2)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 276 71.1 3.6 (64.0–78.2)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 386 71.4 3.4 (64.7–78.1)
Cumberland County, Maine 674 69.6 2.4 (65.0–74.2)
York County, Maine 470 71.5 2.5 (66.6–76.4)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 579 69.6 2.5 (64.7–74.5)
Baltimore County, Maryland 943 76.0 1.8 (72.4–79.6)
Carroll County, Maryland 254 71.7 3.4 (65.1–78.3)

TABLE 15. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the
preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 316 64.8 3.2 (58.5–71.1)
Charles County, Maryland 301 73.4 3.1 (67.3–79.5)
Frederick County, Maryland 583 69.9 2.6 (64.8–75.0)
Harford County, Maryland 289 71.0 3.3 (64.6–77.4)
Howard County, Maryland 321 70.3 3.0 (64.5–76.1)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,140 71.5 1.7 (68.1–74.9)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 652 74.1 2.5 (69.2–79.0)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 275 69.5 3.5 (62.6–76.4)
Washington County, Maryland 399 69.8 3.0 (63.9–75.7)
Baltimore city, Maryland 525 78.9 2.2 (74.6–83.2)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,203 78.2 1.7 (74.8–81.6)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,767 76.8 1.8 (73.4–80.2)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,318 77.3 2.3 (72.9–81.7)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,326 76.5 1.3 (73.9–79.1)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 630 74.8 2.4 (70.1–79.5)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 523 74.3 2.4 (69.7–78.9)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,190 75.6 2.1 (71.4–79.8)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,722 73.3 1.8 (69.8–76.8)
Macomb County, Michigan 379 70.0 3.0 (64.1–75.9)
Oakland County, Michigan 590 73.4 2.3 (68.9–77.9)
Wayne County, Michigan 830 73.3 2.1 (69.3–77.3)
Dakota County, Minnesota 294 76.0 3.1 (69.9–82.1)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 883 72.4 1.8 (68.8–76.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 411 71.4 2.7 (66.1–76.7)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 251 73.2 3.8 (65.8–80.6)
Hinds County, Mississippi 454 73.6 2.5 (68.7–78.5)
Rankin County, Mississippi 270 66.6 3.3 (60.1–73.1)
Jackson County, Missouri 521 64.9 2.7 (59.6–70.2)
St. Louis County, Missouri 349 75.0 3.7 (67.7–82.3)
St. Louis city, Missouri 599 68.8 3.7 (61.5–76.1)
Cascade County, Montana 518 65.7 2.6 (60.7–70.7)
Flathead County, Montana 497 61.2 2.8 (55.8–66.6)
Missoula County, Montana 500 58.4 2.9 (52.8–64.0)
Yellowstone County, Montana 451 64.4 2.7 (59.0–69.8)
Douglas County, Nebraska 972 64.4 2.0 (60.5–68.3)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 713 59.2 2.5 (54.3–64.1)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 288 71.9 3.2 (65.6–78.2)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 532 61.3 2.7 (55.9–66.7)
Clark County, Nevada 1,208 63.2 1.7 (59.9–66.5)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,212 55.9 1.7 (52.5–59.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 495 68.4 2.9 (62.8–74.0)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 468 69.5 2.9 (63.7–75.3)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,434 75.0 1.4 (72.3–77.7)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 635 76.7 2.2 (72.4–81.0)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,023 71.9 1.7 (68.5–75.3)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 628 74.2 2.2 (69.9–78.5)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 533 71.9 3.2 (65.7–78.1)
Bergen County, New Jersey 955 73.5 1.9 (69.8–77.2)
Burlington County, New Jersey 547 73.0 2.7 (67.6–78.4)
Camden County, New Jersey 642 74.5 2.4 (69.7–79.3)
Cape May County, New Jersey 542 76.4 2.6 (71.2–81.6)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,035 72.5 2.1 (68.4–76.6)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 576 71.3 2.4 (66.5–76.1)
Hudson County, New Jersey 831 74.0 2.2 (69.7–78.3)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 509 70.0 2.6 (64.9–75.1)
Mercer County, New Jersey 500 72.2 2.6 (67.0–77.4)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 820 75.5 2.0 (71.6–79.4)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 750 70.7 2.4 (66.0–75.4)
Morris County, New Jersey 700 71.2 2.4 (66.6–75.8)
Ocean County, New Jersey 782 70.7 2.2 (66.3–75.1)
Passaic County, New Jersey 887 72.8 2.6 (67.8–77.8)
Somerset County, New Jersey 575 69.2 2.5 (64.3–74.1)
Sussex County, New Jersey 556 66.8 2.8 (61.3–72.3)
Union County, New Jersey 486 71.2 2.7 (65.9–76.5)
Warren County, New Jersey 512 68.1 2.9 (62.4–73.8)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,147 61.1 1.8 (57.6–64.6)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 531 56.1 2.7 (50.9–61.3)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 367 66.4 3.3 (60.0–72.8)
San Juan County, New Mexico 539 53.2 2.9 (47.5–58.9)

TABLE 15. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the
preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 551 63.7 2.7 (58.4–69.0)
Kings County, New York 465 70.6 2.8 (65.2–76.0)
Nassau County, New York 343 76.6 2.8 (71.1–82.1)
New York County, New York 464 68.0 2.9 (62.3–73.7)
Queens County, New York 420 71.8 3.0 (66.0–77.6)
Suffolk County, New York 343 71.3 3.3 (64.9–77.7)
Westchester County, New York 259 71.0 3.8 (63.5–78.5)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 353 70.1 3.0 (64.1–76.1)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 383 69.1 3.2 (62.9–75.3)
Catawba County, North Carolina 398 70.6 3.1 (64.5–76.7)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 439 70.3 2.9 (64.7–75.9)
Durham County, North Carolina 394 74.5 2.9 (68.7–80.3)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 415 73.9 2.8 (68.3–79.5)
Gaston County, North Carolina 387 71.1 3.0 (65.3–76.9)
Guilford County, North Carolina 444 73.3 3.1 (67.2–79.4)
Johnston County, North Carolina 446 71.9 2.9 (66.1–77.7)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 823 72.7 2.0 (68.7–76.7)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 390 73.0 3.5 (66.1–79.9)
Orange County, North Carolina 363 66.5 3.4 (59.9–73.1)
Randolph County, North Carolina 380 62.8 3.2 (56.6–69.0)
Union County, North Carolina 391 62.9 3.5 (56.1–69.7)
Wake County, North Carolina 649 70.1 2.5 (65.2–75.0)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 407 57.6 3.0 (51.6–63.6)
Cass County, North Dakota 675 60.9 2.3 (56.3–65.5)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 421 74.1 4.0 (66.3–81.9)
Hamilton County, Ohio 373 NA§ NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 481 64.1 4.5 (55.4–72.8)
Lucas County, Ohio 716 66.9 2.5 (62.1–71.7)
Mahoning County, Ohio 815 71.0 2.4 (66.2–75.8)
Montgomery County, Ohio 745 65.5 2.6 (60.3–70.7)
Summit County, Ohio 686 63.7 2.8 (58.2–69.2)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 372 54.3 3.1 (48.2–60.4)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,256 55.6 1.7 (52.2–59.0)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,322 56.3 1.8 (52.8–59.8)
Clackamas County, Oregon 440 59.0 2.9 (53.3–64.7)
Lane County, Oregon 529 55.4 2.6 (50.3–60.5)
Multnomah County, Oregon 768 56.8 2.2 (52.6–61.0)
Washington County, Oregon 495 63.5 2.7 (58.3–68.7)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 512 67.7 2.5 (62.7–72.7)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,493 65.8 2.7 (60.5–71.1)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,625 69.1 1.8 (65.5–72.7)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 305 65.8 3.3 (59.3–72.3)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,759 71.2 2.6 (66.1–76.3)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 282 67.6 5.1 (57.6–77.6)
Kent County, Rhode Island 647 80.5 2.0 (76.5–84.5)
Newport County, Rhode Island 366 75.9 3.0 (70.0–81.8)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,766 80.9 1.1 (78.7–83.1)
Washington County, Rhode Island 517 78.6 2.4 (73.9–83.3)
Aiken County, South Carolina 527 64.4 2.6 (59.3–69.5)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 624 65.6 2.7 (60.3–70.9)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 256 65.7 3.6 (58.6–72.8)
Charleston County, South Carolina 570 68.1 2.6 (62.9–73.3)
Greenville County, South Carolina 510 61.4 2.6 (56.2–66.6)
Horry County, South Carolina 699 60.1 2.5 (55.2–65.0)
Lexington County, South Carolina 319 69.0 3.4 (62.3–75.7)
Richland County, South Carolina 441 64.3 2.9 (58.6–70.0)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 656 67.4 2.4 (62.7–72.1)
Pennington County, South Dakota 748 65.6 2.1 (61.4–69.8)
Davidson County, Tennessee 273 74.6 3.6 (67.6–81.6)
Shelby County, Tennessee 294 80.0 3.4 (73.4–86.6)
Bexar County, Texas 401 62.3 3.3 (55.8–68.8)
Dallas County, Texas 387 63.5 4.0 (55.7–71.3)
El Paso County, Texas 530 62.6 2.7 (57.4–67.8)
Harris County, Texas 384 61.3 4.5 (52.6–70.0)
Lubbock County, Texas 555 59.5 2.9 (53.8–65.2)
Tarrant County, Texas 447 56.4 3.8 (48.9–63.9)
Travis County, Texas 311 68.9 3.4 (62.3–75.5)
Davis County, Utah 413 52.5 2.8 (47.1–57.9)

TABLE 15. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the
preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,659 55.6 1.5 (52.6–58.6)
Summit County, Utah 251 55.8 3.7 (48.6–63.0)
Tooele County, Utah 267 57.9 3.7 (50.6–65.2)
Utah County, Utah 542 45.4 3.0 (39.6–51.2)
Weber County, Utah 416 56.2 2.9 (50.5–61.9)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,487 62.3 1.6 (59.2–65.4)
Franklin County, Vermont 456 66.2 2.6 (61.1–71.3)
Orange County, Vermont 379 65.3 3.1 (59.3–71.3)
Rutland County, Vermont 690 68.4 2.2 (64.2–72.6)
Washington County, Vermont 723 63.7 2.3 (59.2–68.2)
Windsor County, Vermont 734 65.1 2.0 (61.1–69.1)
Asotin County, Washington 347 60.5 3.3 (54.1–66.9)
Benton County, Washington 353 54.9 3.2 (48.6–61.2)
Chelan County, Washington 531 54.8 3.0 (49.0–60.6)
Clark County, Washington 1,533 57.8 1.6 (54.7–60.9)
Douglas County, Washington 498 63.6 2.8 (58.1–69.1)
Franklin County, Washington 307 59.5 3.7 (52.2–66.8)
King County, Washington 3,220 60.6 1.1 (58.5–62.7)
Kitsap County, Washington 899 63.5 2.1 (59.4–67.6)
Pierce County, Washington 1,599 62.9 1.6 (59.8–66.0)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,526 59.3 1.6 (56.1–62.5)
Spokane County, Washington 1,181 59.6 2.0 (55.7–63.5)
Thurston County, Washington 1,534 58.6 1.6 (55.4–61.8)
Yakima County, Washington 739 60.4 2.3 (55.8–65.0)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 446 79.7 2.3 (75.2–84.2)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 982 66.7 2.7 (61.3–72.1)
Laramie County, Wyoming 713 63.1 2.2 (58.7–67.5)
Natrona County, Wyoming 606 61.5 2.3 (57.0–66.0)
Median 68.4
Range 45.4–80.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 16

TABLE 16. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12
months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 849 62.0 1.8 (58.4–65.6)
Alaska 274 62.5 3.8 (55.0–70.0)
Arizona 1,436 65.4 2.1 (61.3–69.5)
Arkansas 1,576 68.6 1.3 (66.1–71.1)
California 1,291 66.9 1.7 (63.5–70.3)
Colorado 1,262 75.9 1.3 (73.4–78.4)
Connecticut 2,280 71.1 1.1 (68.9–73.3)
Delaware 1,011 70.3 1.8 (66.9–73.7)
District of Columbia 823 61.2 2.1 (57.1–65.3)
Florida 3,210 61.5 1.1 (59.3–63.7)
Georgia 1,775 64.8 1.4 (62.0–67.6)
Hawaii 1,489 75.7 1.4 (73.0–78.4)
Idaho 1,221 65.2 1.6 (62.1–68.3)
Illinois 1,297 66.4 1.6 (63.3–69.5)
Indiana 1,588 65.3 1.3 (62.7–67.9)
Iowa 1,472 73.6 1.3 (71.1–76.1)
Kansas 2,277 72.5 1.0 (70.5–74.5)
Kentucky 1,590 66.0 1.5 (63.0–69.0)
Louisiana 1,525 64.4 1.4 (61.6–67.2)
Maine 934 72.0 1.6 (68.9–75.1)
Maryland 2,204 66.1 1.4 (63.4–68.8)
Massachusetts 3,073 73.1 1.1 (70.9–75.3)
Michigan 1,442 71.3 1.3 (68.7–73.9)
Minnesota 1,060 73.8 1.4 (71.0–76.6)
Mississippi 1,660 65.4 1.4 (62.7–68.1)
Missouri 1,541 72.2 1.7 (68.9–75.5)
Montana 1,520 72.6 1.3 (70.0–75.2)
Nebraska 2,281 73.3 1.1 (71.1–75.5)
Nevada 834 57.7 2.3 (53.2–62.2)
New Hampshire 1,391 71.9 1.4 (69.2–74.6)
New Jersey 3,766 66.3 1.0 (64.3–68.3)
New Mexico 1,587 67.6 1.4 (64.8–70.4)
New York 1,536 64.7 1.5 (61.8–67.6)
North Carolina 4,141 69.6 0.9 (67.9–71.3)
North Dakota 1,355 71.4 1.4 (68.6–74.2)
Ohio 1,626 68.2 2.2 (63.9–72.5)
Oklahoma 2,100 70.6 1.1 (68.4–72.8)
Oregon 1,261 71.3 1.4 (68.6–74.0)
Pennsylvania 3,610 68.3 1.3 (65.7–70.9)
Rhode Island 1,237 74.7 1.4 (72.0–77.4)
South Carolina 2,476 62.9 1.2 (60.5–65.3)
South Dakota 1,950 74.1 1.1 (71.9–76.3)
Tennessee 1,108 70.4 1.8 (66.9–73.9)
Texas 1,732 66.4 1.8 (62.9–69.9)
Utah 1,064 72.1 1.7 (68.8–75.4)
Vermont 1,774 72.8 1.1 (70.6–75.0)
Virginia 1,287 69.1 1.8 (65.7–72.5)
Washington 6,546 70.6 0.7 (69.2–72.0)
West Virginia 1,012 66.4 1.6 (63.2–69.6)
Wisconsin 1,063 72.0 1.6 (68.9–75.1)
Wyoming 1,182 70.8 1.4 (68.0–73.6)
Puerto Rico 1,306 33.1 1.5 (30.2–36.0)
U.S.Virgin Islands 471 40.4 2.7 (35.1–45.7)
Median 69.1
Range 33.1–75.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 17

TABLE 17. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12
months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States,
2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 201 NA§ NA —
Albuquerque, New Mexico 436 67.3 2.7 (62.0–72.6)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 240 67.1 5.1 (57.2–77.0)
Asheville, North Carolina 170 70.5 4.0 (62.6–78.4)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 546 63.5 2.6 (58.4–68.6)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 151 63.9 4.5 (55.1–72.7)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 257 68.8 3.5 (61.9–75.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 105 71.7 4.7 (62.5–80.9)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 751 65.4 2.1 (61.3–69.5)
Barre, Vermont 175 77.4 3.3 (70.9–83.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 227 62.2 3.6 (55.1–69.3)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 390 73.8 2.8 (68.3–79.3)
Billings, Montana 123 78.6 4.1 (70.6–86.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 204 60.5 3.8 (53.0–68.0)
Bismarck, North Dakota 134 67.3 4.2 (59.0–75.6)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 280 63.9 3.2 (57.5–70.3)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 565 71.3 2.4 (66.6–76.0)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 227 71.5 3.4 (64.8–78.2)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 668 71.6 2.3 (67.0–76.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 463 73.6 2.2 (69.2–78.0)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 547 77.1 2.3 (72.6–81.6)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 518 70.8 2.5 (66.0–75.6)
Casper, Wyoming 148 68.7 4.1 (60.6–76.8)
Charleston, West Virginia 189 70.2 3.6 (63.1–77.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 227 62.6 3.9 (55.0–70.2)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 554 65.7 2.5 (60.8–70.6)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 185 72.3 3.6 (65.2–79.4)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 856 60.3 2.2 (56.0–64.6)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 234 NA NA —
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 269 71.5 4.8 (62.1–80.9)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 147 74.0 3.9 (66.4–81.6)
Columbia, South Carolina 230 65.2 3.7 (58.0–72.4)
Concord, New Hampshire 161 76.0 3.7 (68.8–83.2)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 111 NA NA —
Dayton, Ohio 258 NA NA —
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 573 80.9 1.8 (77.4–84.4)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 228 75.6 3.1 (69.5–81.7)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 207 62.7 4.0 (54.9–70.5)
Dover, Delaware 322 68.2 2.9 (62.6–73.8)
Durham, North Carolina 232 73.1 3.5 (66.3–79.9)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 870 68.8 1.9 (65.1–72.5)
El Paso, Texas 125 55.8 5.0 (46.0–65.6)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 397 71.2 3.2 (64.9–77.5)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 144 72.1 4.2 (63.9–80.3)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 158 NA NA —
Farmington, New Mexico 88 75.1 5.1 (65.2–85.0)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 111 72.8 4.6 (63.8–81.8)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 195 62.3 4.3 (53.9–70.7)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 116 NA NA —
Great Falls, Montana 131 70.7 4.3 (62.2–79.2)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 275 70.6 3.4 (64.0–77.2)
Greenville, South Carolina 222 64.1 3.7 (56.9–71.3)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 167 65.7 4.5 (56.9–74.5)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 724 68.4 1.9 (64.6–72.2)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 176 67.7 4.4 (59.1–76.3)
Hilo, Hawaii 331 66.3 2.9 (60.6–72.0)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 243 65.1 3.3 (58.6–71.6)
Honolulu, Hawaii 731 76.9 1.8 (73.4–80.4)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 92 NA NA —
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 151 NA NA —
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 457 70.1 2.5 (65.2–75.0)
Jackson, Mississippi 261 61.8 3.6 (54.8–68.8)
Jacksonville, Florida 156 64.6 4.7 (55.4–73.8)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 285 68.3 3.6 (61.3–75.3)
Kalispell, Montana 131 63.9 4.8 (54.4–73.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 774 70.6 2.1 (66.5–74.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 142 80.9 4.1 (72.9–88.9)
Keene, New Hampshire 117 75.7 4.4 (67.1–84.3)

TABLE 17. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the
preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 160 69.1 4.7 (59.8–78.4)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 132 55.9 4.8 (46.5–65.3)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 289 54.1 3.3 (47.7–60.5)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 424 73.5 2.3 (69.0–78.0)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 185 69.9 4.0 (62.0–77.8)
Lincoln, Nebraska 204 72.8 3.3 (66.3–79.3)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 275 68.5 3.1 (62.4–74.6)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 147 63.8 5.1 (53.8–73.8)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 199 71.6 3.5 (64.7–78.5)
Lubbock, Texas 182 67.0 3.9 (59.4–74.6)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 281 71.0 3.0 (65.2–76.8)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 180 NA NA —
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 625 54.2 2.3 (49.7–58.7)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 267 78.4 3.3 (72.0–84.8)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 523 78.2 1.9 (74.5–81.9)
Missoula, Montana 117 74.5 4.4 (65.8–83.2)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 244 67.5 3.3 (61.1–73.9)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 152 72.1 4.5 (63.3–80.9)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 185 66.8 4.0 (59.0–74.6)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 860 61.3 2.4 (56.6–66.0)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 541 73.5 2.2 (69.1–77.9)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 292 64.9 3.3 (58.4–71.4)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 1,204 59.7 2.1 (55.5–63.9)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 170 66.1 4.0 (58.3–73.9)
Ocean City, New Jersey 202 72.1 3.4 (65.4–78.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 182 71.4 3.9 (63.8–79.0)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 566 68.4 2.3 (64.0–72.8)
Olympia, Washington 387 71.8 2.6 (66.8–76.8)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 395 74.6 2.4 (69.8–79.4)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 189 64.1 4.0 (56.3–71.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 632 64.9 3.1 (58.8–71.0)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 401 64.0 3.3 (57.5–70.5)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,057 66.9 2.8 (61.3–72.5)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 293 74.6 2.7 (69.3–79.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 839 71.6 2.1 (67.5–75.7)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 1,775 71.5 1.4 (68.8–74.2)
Provo-Orem, Utah 99 69.5 5.0 (59.7–79.3)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 254 77.7 3.6 (70.6–84.8)
Rapid City, South Dakota 242 70.1 3.1 (63.9–76.3)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 269 62.7 3.2 (56.4–69.0)
Richmond, Virginia 193 65.2 4.2 (56.9–73.5)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 162 57.5 4.6 (48.5–66.5)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 348 66.0 2.9 (60.4–71.6)
Rutland, Vermont 199 69.5 3.5 (62.6–76.4)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 422 72.1 3.3 (65.6–78.6)
Salt Lake City, Utah 406 74.2 2.5 (69.2–79.2)
San Antonio, Texas 146 64.5 4.5 (55.6–73.4)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 126 68.1 4.9 (58.5–77.7)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 185 69.1 4.8 (59.8–78.4)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 127 60.9 5.0 (51.0–70.8)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 186 70.3 3.7 (63.1–77.5)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 801 61.0 4.7 (51.7–70.3)
Seaford, Delaware 404 65.9 2.5 (60.9–70.9)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 1,082 71.8 1.8 (68.2–75.4)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 163 65.5 4.1 (57.4–73.6)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 232 79.4 2.9 (73.8–85.0)
Spokane, Washington 308 68.8 2.9 (63.1–74.5)
Springfield, Massachusetts 419 71.1 3.0 (65.2–77.0)
Tacoma, Washingtonķ 388 64.3 2.7 (59.1–69.5)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 334 65.8 2.9 (60.1–71.5)
Toledo, Ohio 185 NA NA —
Topeka, Kansas 216 72.5 3.3 (66.1–78.9)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 142 76.2 4.0 (68.4–84.0)
Tucson, Arizona 277 71.2 3.1 (65.0–77.4)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 583 72.7 2.1 (68.6–76.8)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 261 64.8 3.8 (57.4–72.2)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 297 67.9 2.9 (62.2–73.6)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 1,245 68.9 3.6 (61.9–75.9)

TABLE 17. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the
preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wenatchee, Washington 340 72.8 2.7 (67.6–78.0)
Wichita, Kansas 455 74.5 2.2 (70.2–78.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 394 67.4 3.0 (61.6–73.2)
Wilmington, North Carolina 209 74.2 3.3 (67.7–80.7)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 172 72.5 3.5 (65.6–79.4)
Worcester, Massachusetts 397 72.8 3.3 (66.4–79.2)
Yakima, Washington 215 73.7 3.1 (67.5–79.9)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 307 NA NA —
Yuma, Arizona 168 65.7 4.0 (57.9–73.5)
Median 69.3
Range 54.1–80.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 18

TABLE 18. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12
months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 133 65.2 4.6 (56.1–74.3)
Maricopa County, Arizona 237 64.3 3.6 (57.2–71.4)
Pima County, Arizona 277 71.2 3.1 (65.0–77.4)
Pinal County, Arizona 164 NA§ NA —
Yuma County, Arizona 168 65.7 4.0 (57.9–73.5)
Benton County, Arkansas 109 62.7 4.9 (53.1–72.3)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 163 67.6 3.9 (59.9–75.3)
Washington County, Arkansas 72 NA NA —
Alameda County, California 60 NA NA —
Los Angeles County, California 147 63.8 5.1 (53.8–73.8)
Riverside County, California 97 NA NA —
San Bernardino County, California 65 NA NA —
San Diego County, California 126 68.1 4.9 (58.5–77.7)
Adams County, Colorado 75 NA NA —
Arapahoe County, Colorado 133 81.2 3.6 (74.2–88.2)
Denver County, Colorado 152 82.1 3.2 (75.9–88.3)
Douglas County, Colorado NA NA NA —
El Paso County, Colorado 141 74.1 4.0 (66.2–82.0)
Jefferson County, Colorado 148 81.0 3.5 (74.1–87.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 668 71.6 2.3 (67.0–76.2)
Hartford County, Connecticut 522 68.9 2.3 (64.4–73.4)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 114 68.8 4.7 (59.6–78.0)
New Haven County, Connecticut 541 73.5 2.2 (69.1–77.9)
New London County, Connecticut 170 66.1 4.0 (58.3–73.9)
Tolland County, Connecticut 88 NA NA —
Kent County, Delaware 322 68.2 2.9 (62.6–73.8)
New Castle County, Delaware 285 72.6 2.8 (67.1–78.1)
Sussex County, Delaware 404 65.9 2.5 (60.9–70.9)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 823 61.1 2.1 (57.0–65.2)
Broward County, Florida 196 52.1 4.3 (43.7–60.5)
Duval County, Florida 64 NA NA —
Hillsborough County, Florida 120 61.8 5.1 (51.9–71.7)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 235 42.6 3.8 (35.1–50.1)
Orange County, Florida 80 NA NA —
Palm Beach County, Florida 194 67.7 3.8 (60.3–75.1)
Pinellas County, Florida 119 70.9 4.9 (61.3–80.5)
Clayton County, Georgia 71 NA NA —
Cobb County, Georgia 72 NA NA —
DeKalb County, Georgia 80 NA NA —
Fulton County, Georgia 80 NA NA —
Gwinnett County, Georgia 51 NA NA —
Hawaii County, Hawaii 331 66.3 2.9 (60.6–72.0)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 731 76.9 1.8 (73.4–80.4)
Kauai County, Hawaii 142 80.9 4.1 (72.9–88.9)
Maui County, Hawaii 285 68.3 3.6 (61.3–75.3)
Ada County, Idaho 132 70.6 4.4 (62.0–79.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 112 NA NA —
Nez Perce County, Idaho 66 NA NA —
Cook County, Illinois 405 61.1 3.0 (55.2–67.0)
DuPage County, Illinois 75 NA NA —
Lake County, Illinois 52 NA NA —
Lake County, Indiana 125 43.9 5.1 (33.9–53.9)
Marion County, Indiana 300 69.0 3.1 (62.9–75.1)
Polk County, Iowa 171 78.6 3.4 (71.8–85.4)
Johnson County, Kansas 302 76.2 2.6 (71.0–81.4)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 344 74.2 2.5 (69.2–79.2)
Shawnee County, Kansas 159 71.1 3.9 (63.5–78.7)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 69 NA NA —
Jefferson County, Kentucky 117 75.0 4.2 (66.7–83.3)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 97 NA NA —
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 149 64.0 4.4 (55.4–72.6)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 130 60.1 4.9 (50.5–69.7)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 58 NA NA —
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 75 NA NA —
Cumberland County, Maine 149 77.4 3.6 (70.3–84.5)
York County, Maine 103 70.3 4.8 (61.0–79.6)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 146 65.2 4.4 (56.6–73.8)
Baltimore County, Maryland 256 60.2 3.5 (53.4–67.0)
Carroll County, Maryland 67 80.6 4.9 (71.0–90.2)

TABLE 18. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the
preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 61 NA NA —
Charles County, Maryland NA NA NA —
Frederick County, Maryland 98 78.5 4.4 (70.0–87.0)
Harford County, Maryland 62 NA NA —
Howard County, Maryland 55 90.2 4.4 (81.6–98.8)
Montgomery County, Maryland 292 73.1 3.2 (66.8–79.4)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 146 NA NA —
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 52 NA NA —
Washington County, Maryland 119 62.5 4.9 (52.8–72.2)
Baltimore city, Maryland 113 NA NA —
Bristol County, Massachusetts 538 62.9 3.7 (55.7–70.1)
Essex County, Massachusetts 397 71.5 3.3 (65.1–77.9)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 347 71.4 3.5 (64.6–78.2)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 547 77.4 2.3 (73.0–81.8)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 186 73.3 3.6 (66.2–80.4)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 117 68.8 4.9 (59.2–78.4)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 262 74.5 3.2 (68.2–80.8)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 397 72.8 3.3 (66.4–79.2)
Macomb County, Michigan 97 72.8 4.8 (63.3–82.3)
Oakland County, Michigan 152 68.3 4.0 (60.4–76.2)
Wayne County, Michigan 207 62.7 4.0 (54.9–70.5)
Dakota County, Minnesota 54 NA NA —
Hennepin County, Minnesota 206 76.5 3.1 (70.4–82.6)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 95 84.3 4.1 (76.2–92.4)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 56 NA NA —
Hinds County, Mississippi 112 NA NA —
Rankin County, Mississippi 67 NA NA —
Jackson County, Missouri 153 68.3 4.2 (60.2–76.4)
St. Louis County, Missouri 90 NA NA —
St. Louis city, Missouri 162 NA NA —
Cascade County, Montana 131 70.7 4.3 (62.2–79.2)
Flathead County, Montana 131 63.9 4.8 (54.4–73.4)
Missoula County, Montana 117 74.5 4.4 (65.8–83.2)
Yellowstone County, Montana 109 79.5 4.3 (71.2–87.8)
Douglas County, Nebraska 221 74.9 3.3 (68.5–81.3)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 187 71.9 3.5 (65.0–78.8)
Sarpy County, Nebraska NA NA NA —
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 180 71.3 3.7 (64.1–78.5)
Clark County, Nevada 289 54.1 3.3 (47.7–60.5)
Washoe County, Nevada 268 62.5 3.2 (56.2–68.8)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 117 75.7 4.4 (67.1–84.3)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 119 76.1 4.1 (68.0–84.2)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 281 71.0 3.0 (65.2–76.8)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 161 76.0 3.7 (68.8–83.2)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 219 66.1 3.6 (59.0–73.2)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 129 65.8 4.5 (56.9–74.7)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 151 63.9 4.5 (55.1–72.7)
Bergen County, New Jersey 277 66.1 3.4 (59.5–72.7)
Burlington County, New Jersey 169 73.2 4.0 (65.3–81.1)
Camden County, New Jersey 199 68.2 3.9 (60.6–75.8)
Cape May County, New Jersey 202 72.1 3.4 (65.4–78.8)
Essex County, New Jersey 240 57.4 3.9 (49.7–65.1)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 150 76.6 3.8 (69.2–84.0)
Hudson County, New Jersey 198 59.9 4.6 (51.0–68.8)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 128 77.3 4.0 (69.5–85.1)
Mercer County, New Jersey 142 76.2 4.0 (68.4–84.0)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 198 72.9 4.4 (64.3–81.5)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 229 61.8 3.6 (54.7–68.9)
Morris County, New Jersey 209 73.5 3.5 (66.6–80.4)
Ocean County, New Jersey 300 69.5 3.0 (63.7–75.3)
Passaic County, New Jersey 242 60.0 4.2 (51.7–68.3)
Somerset County, New Jersey 143 76.1 4.1 (68.1–84.1)
Sussex County, New Jersey 139 69.3 4.9 (59.8–78.8)
Union County, New Jersey 135 52.3 5.0 (42.5–62.1)
Warren County, New Jersey 163 65.1 4.5 (56.3–73.9)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 281 67.7 3.3 (61.3–74.1)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 132 55.9 4.8 (46.5–65.3)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 87 NA NA —
San Juan County, New Mexico 88 75.1 5.1 (65.2–85.0)

TABLE 18. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the
preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 127 60.9 5.0 (51.0–70.8)
Kings County, New York 108 NA NA —
Nassau County, New York 99 NA NA —
New York County, New York 127 NA NA —
Queens County, New York 87 NA NA —
Suffolk County, New York 86 NA NA —
Westchester County, New York 72 NA NA —
Buncombe County, North Carolina 107 77.0 4.5 (68.3–85.7)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 94 NA NA —
Catawba County, North Carolina 116 62.4 5.0 (52.5–72.3)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 89 73.1 5.0 (63.3–82.9)
Durham County, North Carolina 80 NA NA —
Forsyth County, North Carolina 121 71.6 4.2 (63.3–79.9)
Gaston County, North Carolina 122 64.7 4.7 (55.5–73.9)
Guilford County, North Carolina 124 66.5 4.8 (57.1–75.9)
Johnston County, North Carolina 104 73.1 4.5 (64.4–81.8)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 178 67.9 4.0 (60.1–75.7)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 122 73.8 4.2 (65.6–82.0)
Orange County, North Carolina 78 82.7 4.8 (73.3–92.1)
Randolph County, North Carolina 112 NA NA —
Union County, North Carolina 86 NA NA —
Wake County, North Carolina 119 80.6 4.7 (71.4–89.8)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 97 64.5 5.1 (54.5–74.5)
Cass County, North Dakota 147 76.9 3.7 (69.6–84.2)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 112 NA NA —
Hamilton County, Ohio 103 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 134 69.9 5.1 (60.0–79.8)
Lucas County, Ohio 167 66.2 4.5 (57.3–75.1)
Mahoning County, Ohio 276 63.4 3.6 (56.3–70.5)
Montgomery County, Ohio 243 59.7 4.0 (51.9–67.5)
Summit County, Ohio 196 80.3 3.4 (73.6–87.0)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 91 NA NA —
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 347 69.6 2.9 (63.8–75.4)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 407 74.1 2.4 (69.5–78.7)
Clackamas County, Oregon 112 71.1 4.6 (62.2–80.0)
Lane County, Oregon 144 72.1 4.2 (63.9–80.3)
Multnomah County, Oregon 162 73.6 3.8 (66.1–81.1)
Washington County, Oregon 90 NA NA —
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 149 69.0 4.1 (60.9–77.1)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 704 64.7 4.1 (56.6–72.8)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 757 61.4 4.8 (52.0–70.8)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 78 81.3 4.8 (71.9–90.7)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 409 NA NA —
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 92 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 177 76.6 3.4 (69.9–83.3)
Newport County, Rhode Island 104 69.7 4.8 (60.3–79.1)
Providence County, Rhode Island 760 71.8 1.8 (68.2–75.4)
Washington County, Rhode Island 139 79.9 3.6 (72.8–87.0)
Aiken County, South Carolina 168 64.0 4.1 (56.0–72.0)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 223 67.6 3.3 (61.1–74.1)
Berkeley County, South Carolina NA NA NA —
Charleston County, South Carolina 149 63.5 4.4 (54.8–72.2)
Greenville County, South Carolina 137 60.8 4.7 (51.6–70.0)
Horry County, South Carolina 244 67.5 3.3 (61.1–73.9)
Lexington County, South Carolina 80 NA NA —
Richland County, South Carolina 88 NA NA —
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 164 81.5 3.3 (75.0–88.0)
Pennington County, South Dakota 191 70.2 3.6 (63.2–77.2)
Davidson County, Tennessee 76 NA NA —
Shelby County, Tennessee 56 NA NA —
Bexar County, Texas 102 NA NA —
Dallas County, Texas 88 NA NA —
El Paso County, Texas 125 55.8 5.0 (46.0–65.6)
Harris County, Texas 69 NA NA —
Lubbock County, Texas 178 66.8 3.9 (59.2–74.4)
Tarrant County, Texas 101 NA NA —
Travis County, Texas 61 NA NA —
Davis County, Utah 75 NA NA —
Salt Lake County, Utah 322 73.8 2.7 (68.5–79.1)

TABLE 18. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had received an influenza vaccination during the
preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah NA NA NA —
Tooele County, Utah 54 NA NA —
Utah County, Utah 96 69.0 5.1 (59.0–79.0)
Weber County, Utah 104 NA NA —
Chittenden County, Vermont 326 76.2 2.6 (71.2–81.2)
Franklin County, Vermont 116 66.7 4.9 (57.1–76.3)
Orange County, Vermont 110 70.5 4.6 (61.5–79.5)
Rutland County, Vermont 199 69.5 3.5 (62.6–76.4)
Washington County, Vermont 175 77.4 3.3 (70.9–83.9)
Windsor County, Vermont 195 72.9 3.3 (66.4–79.4)
Asotin County, Washington 119 70.9 4.7 (61.6–80.2)
Benton County, Washington 90 NA NA —
Chelan County, Washington 185 73.8 3.4 (67.1–80.5)
Clark County, Washington 360 72.4 2.6 (67.4–77.4)
Douglas County, Washington 155 70.7 3.9 (63.0–78.4)
Franklin County, Washington 70 NA NA —
King County, Washington 725 71.2 1.9 (67.6–74.8)
Kitsap County, Washington 227 71.5 3.4 (64.8–78.2)
Pierce County, Washington 388 64.7 2.6 (59.6–69.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 357 75.6 2.5 (70.7–80.5)
Spokane County, Washington 308 68.8 2.9 (63.1–74.5)
Thurston County, Washington 387 71.8 2.6 (66.8–76.8)
Yakima County, Washington 215 73.7 3.1 (67.5–79.9)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 129 73.8 4.2 (65.6–82.0)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 174 80.3 4.5 (71.5–89.1)
Laramie County, Wyoming 185 72.3 3.6 (65.2–79.4)
Natrona County, Wyoming 148 68.7 4.1 (60.6–76.8)
Median 70.7
Range 42.6–90.2
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 19

TABLE 19. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by state/territory —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 824 59.7 1.9 (56.0–63.4)
Alaska 254 59.9 4.2 (51.6–68.2)
Arizona 1,378 66.5 2.2 (62.2–70.8)
Arkansas 1,525 64.4 1.3 (61.8–67.0)
California 1,249 60.0 1.9 (56.3–63.7)
Colorado 1,229 72.9 1.4 (70.2–75.6)
Connecticut 2,185 68.1 1.2 (65.8–70.4)
Delaware 982 65.6 1.9 (61.8–69.4)
District of Columbia 771 52.0 2.2 (47.7–56.3)
Florida 3,105 62.9 1.1 (60.7–65.1)
Georgia 1,719 63.1 1.5 (60.2–66.0)
Hawaii 1,416 68.8 1.6 (65.7–71.9)
Idaho 1,190 62.8 1.6 (59.6–66.0)
Illinois 1,272 60.0 1.6 (56.8–63.2)
Indiana 1,547 63.8 1.4 (61.1–66.5)
Iowa 1,440 71.1 1.3 (68.5–73.7)
Kansas 2,238 69.5 1.1 (67.4–71.6)
Kentucky 1,558 64.6 1.6 (61.5–67.7)
Louisiana 1,494 66.4 1.4 (63.6–69.2)
Maine 904 67.9 1.8 (64.5–71.3)
Maryland 2,130 66.0 1.4 (63.3–68.7)
Massachusetts 2,912 70.8 1.2 (68.5–73.1)
Michigan 1,391 67.6 1.4 (64.9–70.3)
Minnesota 1,038 71.1 1.5 (68.1–74.1)
Mississippi 1,633 68.7 1.3 (66.1–71.3)
Missouri 1,502 67.8 1.8 (64.3–71.3)
Montana 1,486 71.5 1.3 (68.9–74.1)
Nebraska 2,234 68.3 1.2 (65.9–70.7)
Nevada 809 69.1 2.2 (64.8–73.4)
New Hampshire 1,336 68.4 1.5 (65.5–71.3)
New Jersey 3,625 66.4 1.0 (64.4–68.4)
New Mexico 1,530 64.5 1.5 (61.6–67.4)
New York 1,477 61.0 1.5 (58.0–64.0)
North Carolina 4,035 68.5 0.9 (66.7–70.3)
North Dakota 1,309 69.4 1.5 (66.4–72.4)
Ohio 1,580 68.5 2.2 (64.2–72.8)
Oklahoma 2,043 70.2 1.2 (67.9–72.5)
Oregon 1,218 74.7 1.3 (72.1–77.3)
Pennsylvania 3,497 68.8 1.4 (66.1–71.5)
Rhode Island 1,194 72.5 1.4 (69.7–75.3)
South Carolina 2,392 61.5 1.3 (59.0–64.0)
South Dakota 1,889 65.0 1.3 (62.5–67.5)
Tennessee 1,092 66.5 1.9 (62.8–70.2)
Texas 1,677 63.7 1.9 (60.0–67.4)
Utah 1,044 65.9 1.8 (62.4–69.4)
Vermont 1,723 66.9 1.2 (64.5–69.3)
Virginia 1,240 66.8 1.9 (63.2–70.4)
Washington 6,335 69.6 0.8 (68.1–71.1)
West Virginia 991 65.4 1.7 (62.2–68.6)
Wisconsin 1,032 71.9 1.6 (68.7–75.1)
Wyoming 1,160 69.7 1.5 (66.8–72.6)
Puerto Rico 1,172 29.5 1.5 (26.6–32.4)
U.S.Virgin Islands 446 39.5 2.8 (34.0–45.0)
Median 66.8
Range 29.5–74.7
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 20

TABLE 20. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 193 74.0 4.7 (64.8–83.2)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 423 68.7 2.7 (63.4–74.0)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 231 NA§ NA —
Asheville, North Carolina 165 68.8 4.2 (60.6–77.0)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 532 65.4 2.6 (60.3–70.5)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 148 67.0 4.4 (58.3–75.7)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 247 66.3 3.6 (59.2–73.4)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 99 70.3 4.9 (60.6–80.0)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 727 67.2 2.1 (63.1–71.3)
Barre, Vermont 167 65.3 4.0 (57.5–73.1)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 220 66.9 3.5 (59.9–73.9)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 374 69.0 2.9 (63.3–74.7)
Billings, Montana 121 79.6 3.9 (72.0–87.2)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 199 58.5 3.9 (50.9–66.1)
Bismarck, North Dakota 129 67.5 4.4 (58.9–76.1)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 274 66.1 3.3 (59.6–72.6)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 528 67.6 2.5 (62.7–72.5)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 218 73.5 3.3 (67.0–80.0)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 636 67.1 2.4 (62.4–71.8)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 448 66.2 2.5 (61.4–71.0)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 514 74.4 2.4 (69.7–79.1)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 497 75.1 2.4 (70.4–79.8)
Casper, Wyoming 146 73.7 4.0 (65.9–81.5)
Charleston, West Virginia 189 71.0 3.6 (63.9–78.1)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 217 63.1 4.0 (55.2–71.0)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 543 64.2 2.5 (59.2–69.2)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 183 70.2 3.7 (63.0–77.4)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 835 54.9 2.2 (50.5–59.3)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 227 NA NA —
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 262 68.6 5.1 (58.7–78.5)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 144 64.9 4.3 (56.5–73.3)
Columbia, South Carolina 223 64.3 3.7 (57.1–71.5)
Concord, New Hampshire 148 64.8 4.5 (56.0–73.6)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 108 NA NA —
Dayton, Ohio 246 71.5 4.6 (62.4–80.6)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 558 75.8 2.0 (71.9–79.7)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 226 71.1 3.4 (64.5–77.7)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 201 55.1 4.1 (47.1–63.1)
Dover, Delaware 314 64.1 3.0 (58.2–70.0)
Durham, North Carolina 223 71.9 3.4 (65.2–78.6)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 845 72.0 1.9 (68.4–75.6)
El Paso, Texas 116 NA NA —
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 369 68.6 3.4 (61.9–75.3)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 138 73.6 4.2 (65.4–81.8)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 152 NA NA —
Farmington, New Mexico 88 NA NA —
Fayetteville, North Carolina 109 68.4 5.0 (58.6–78.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 185 61.8 4.5 (53.1–70.5)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 114 NA NA —
Great Falls, Montana 127 66.3 4.7 (57.1–75.5)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 269 68.7 3.3 (62.1–75.3)
Greenville, South Carolina 214 64.7 3.7 (57.4–72.0)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 156 61.1 5.0 (51.2–71.0)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 696 67.7 2.0 (63.8–71.6)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 171 74.0 3.9 (66.4–81.6)
Hilo, Hawaii 315 59.2 3.1 (53.1–65.3)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 231 64.1 3.5 (57.3–70.9)
Honolulu, Hawaii 692 69.8 2.0 (65.8–73.8)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 88 NA NA —
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 149 NA NA —
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 444 67.5 2.7 (62.3–72.7)
Jackson, Mississippi 260 66.6 3.5 (59.7–73.5)
Jacksonville, Florida 153 60.6 4.9 (51.0–70.2)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 274 64.5 3.7 (57.2–71.8)
Kalispell, Montana 130 61.2 4.9 (51.6–70.8)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 757 68.1 2.2 (63.8–72.4)
Kapaa, Hawaii 135 71.4 4.8 (61.9–80.9)
Keene, New Hampshire 113 67.2 4.9 (57.6–76.8)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 157 63.3 4.9 (53.7–72.9)

TABLE 20. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 130 59.1 4.8 (49.7–68.5)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 282 69.5 3.1 (63.4–75.6)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 406 72.6 2.4 (67.9–77.3)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 184 61.4 4.3 (53.0–69.8)
Lincoln, Nebraska 202 72.9 3.4 (66.3–79.5)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 265 63.3 3.2 (57.0–69.6)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 141 NA NA —
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 194 70.6 3.6 (63.5–77.7)
Lubbock, Texas 175 74.9 3.7 (67.6–82.2)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 270 67.4 3.2 (61.2–73.6)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 174 NA NA —
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 598 52.4 2.4 (47.8–57.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 260 71.4 3.8 (63.9–78.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 513 74.0 2.1 (69.9–78.1)
Missoula, Montana 113 73.4 4.6 (64.4–82.4)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 236 65.7 3.3 (59.2–72.2)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 149 67.8 4.7 (58.5–77.1)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 173 58.7 4.2 (50.5–66.9)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 830 57.8 2.4 (53.0–62.6)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 518 66.0 2.6 (61.0–71.0)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 283 63.0 3.4 (56.3–69.7)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 1,154 52.9 2.2 (48.6–57.2)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 164 69.9 3.9 (62.2–77.6)
Ocean City, New Jersey 197 67.4 3.7 (60.1–74.7)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 178 65.7 4.1 (57.7–73.7)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 551 72.9 2.2 (68.6–77.2)
Olympia, Washington 373 67.4 2.7 (62.0–72.8)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 384 69.2 2.6 (64.0–74.4)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 182 62.9 4.1 (54.9–70.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 609 67.4 3.2 (61.2–73.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 386 63.7 3.4 (57.0–70.4)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,032 74.5 2.6 (69.4–79.6)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 288 66.1 3.1 (60.1–72.1)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 810 73.9 2.0 (70.0–77.8)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 1,712 69.8 1.4 (67.0–72.6)
Provo-Orem, Utah 95 NA NA —
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 244 69.3 4.1 (61.3–77.3)
Rapid City, South Dakota 237 66.8 3.3 (60.3–73.3)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 262 69.7 3.2 (63.5–75.9)
Richmond, Virginia 184 60.5 4.4 (51.8–69.2)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 160 61.5 4.6 (52.5–70.5)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 337 63.7 2.9 (57.9–69.5)
Rutland, Vermont 198 61.1 3.8 (53.6–68.6)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 414 68.7 3.6 (61.7–75.7)
Salt Lake City, Utah 397 66.2 2.9 (60.6–71.8)
San Antonio, Texas 143 65.2 4.5 (56.4–74.0)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 122 65.2 4.9 (55.5–74.9)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 179 61.2 4.9 (51.5–70.9)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 121 NA NA —
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 184 58.9 4.0 (51.1–66.7)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 776 55.4 4.9 (45.8–65.0)
Seaford, Delaware 395 66.7 2.6 (61.6–71.8)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 1,039 68.7 1.9 (64.9–72.5)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 160 64.8 4.3 (56.4–73.2)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 226 65.5 3.5 (58.6–72.4)
Spokane, Washington 298 71.6 3.0 (65.8–77.4)
Springfield, Massachusetts 397 69.9 3.2 (63.7–76.1)
Tacoma, Washingtonķ 377 68.7 2.7 (63.5–73.9)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 320 71.3 2.8 (65.7–76.9)
Toledo, Ohio 182 NA NA —
Topeka, Kansas 216 66.2 3.5 (59.3–73.1)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 134 77.2 3.9 (69.6–84.8)
Tucson, Arizona 267 72.8 3.3 (66.3–79.3)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 565 68.0 2.3 (63.5–72.5)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 253 65.7 4.0 (57.8–73.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 280 65.8 3.1 (59.8–71.8)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 1,175 65.9 3.9 (58.2–73.6)
Wenatchee, Washington 323 65.9 2.9 (60.2–71.6)

TABLE 20. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 453 72.4 2.3 (67.8–77.0)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 379 64.2 2.8 (58.7–69.7)
Wilmington, North Carolina 202 71.7 3.5 (64.9–78.5)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 172 72.3 3.5 (65.3–79.3)
Worcester, Massachusetts 380 64.8 3.6 (57.8–71.8)
Yakima, Washington 206 68.1 3.6 (61.1–75.1)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 301 NA NA —
Yuma, Arizona 162 65.0 4.0 (57.2–72.8)
Median 67.2
Range 52.4–79.6
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 21

TABLE 21. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 130 57.3 4.9 (47.8–66.8)
Maricopa County, Arizona 227 63.2 3.8 (55.8–70.6)
Pima County, Arizona 267 72.8 3.3 (66.3–79.3)
Pinal County, Arizona 159 NA§ NA —
Yuma County, Arizona 162 65.0 4.0 (57.2–72.8)
Benton County, Arkansas 104 66.2 5.0 (56.4–76.0)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 157 65.0 4.0 (57.1–72.9)
Washington County, Arkansas 67 NA NA —
Alameda County, California 59 NA NA —
Los Angeles County, California 141 NA NA —
Riverside County, California 97 NA NA —
San Bernardino County, California 63 NA NA —
San Diego County, California 122 65.2 4.9 (55.5–74.9)
Adams County, Colorado 72 76.7 5.1 (66.7–86.7)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 131 73.2 4.3 (64.8–81.6)
Denver County, Colorado 144 82.1 3.5 (75.3–88.9)
Douglas County, Colorado NA NA NA —
El Paso County, Colorado 138 66.2 4.4 (57.6–74.8)
Jefferson County, Colorado 147 74.4 4.0 (66.6–82.2)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 636 67.1 2.4 (62.4–71.8)
Hartford County, Connecticut 498 65.7 2.4 (61.0–70.4)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 113 67.8 4.8 (58.3–77.3)
New Haven County, Connecticut 518 66.0 2.6 (61.0–71.0)
New London County, Connecticut 164 69.9 3.9 (62.2–77.6)
Tolland County, Connecticut 85 77.7 4.8 (68.2–87.2)
Kent County, Delaware 314 64.1 3.0 (58.2–70.0)
New Castle County, Delaware 273 63.7 3.2 (57.5–69.9)
Sussex County, Delaware 395 66.7 2.6 (61.6–71.8)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 771 52.4 2.2 (48.1–56.7)
Broward County, Florida 188 50.2 4.3 (41.7–58.7)
Duval County, Florida 63 NA NA —
Hillsborough County, Florida 112 72.4 4.8 (62.9–81.9)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 226 42.2 3.8 (34.7–49.7)
Orange County, Florida 78 NA NA —
Palm Beach County, Florida 184 64.4 4.1 (56.5–72.3)
Pinellas County, Florida 116 75.8 4.7 (66.6–85.0)
Clayton County, Georgia 71 NA NA —
Cobb County, Georgia 70 NA NA —
DeKalb County, Georgia 76 NA NA —
Fulton County, Georgia 78 NA NA —
Gwinnett County, Georgia NA NA NA —
Hawaii County, Hawaii 315 59.2 3.1 (53.1–65.3)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 692 69.8 2.0 (65.8–73.8)
Kauai County, Hawaii 135 71.4 4.8 (61.9–80.9)
Maui County, Hawaii 274 64.5 3.7 (57.2–71.8)
Ada County, Idaho 127 63.7 4.9 (54.2–73.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 113 71.2 4.7 (62.0–80.4)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 67 NA NA —
Cook County, Illinois 396 56.2 3.1 (50.2–62.2)
DuPage County, Illinois 75 NA NA —
Lake County, Illinois 50 NA NA —
Lake County, Indiana 121 NA NA —
Marion County, Indiana 292 69.5 3.2 (63.3–75.7)
Polk County, Iowa 169 73.4 3.9 (65.8–81.0)
Johnson County, Kansas 295 78.9 2.5 (73.9–83.9)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 343 71.4 2.7 (66.0–76.8)
Shawnee County, Kansas 159 65.4 4.1 (57.3–73.5)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 68 NA NA —
Jefferson County, Kentucky 115 77.6 4.1 (69.5–85.7)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 96 NA NA —
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 142 65.8 4.3 (57.4–74.2)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 127 58.7 4.9 (49.0–68.4)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 56 NA NA —
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 72 NA NA —
Cumberland County, Maine 146 66.6 4.4 (58.0–75.2)
York County, Maine 101 64.2 5.1 (54.2–74.2)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 141 70.1 4.1 (62.0–78.2)
Baltimore County, Maryland 251 64.2 3.5 (57.4–71.0)
Carroll County, Maryland 63 NA NA —

TABLE 21. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 58 NA NA —
Charles County, Maryland NA NA NA —
Frederick County, Maryland 98 74.2 5.0 (64.3–84.1)
Harford County, Maryland 61 NA NA —
Howard County, Maryland 52 NA NA —
Montgomery County, Maryland 276 68.0 3.4 (61.4–74.6)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 140 NA NA —
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 50 NA NA —
Washington County, Maryland 110 69.2 4.7 (59.9–78.5)
Baltimore city, Maryland 109 NA NA —
Bristol County, Massachusetts 518 64.8 3.8 (57.3–72.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts 369 69.0 3.4 (62.2–75.8)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 327 68.3 3.8 (60.9–75.7)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 514 74.9 2.3 (70.3–79.5)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 177 72.4 3.8 (65.0–79.8)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 115 70.5 5.0 (60.8–80.2)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 236 60.6 4.0 (52.7–68.5)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 380 64.8 3.6 (57.8–71.8)
Macomb County, Michigan 88 NA NA —
Oakland County, Michigan 148 66.9 4.2 (58.7–75.1)
Wayne County, Michigan 201 55.1 4.1 (47.1–63.1)
Dakota County, Minnesota 52 NA NA —
Hennepin County, Minnesota 201 75.7 3.3 (69.2–82.2)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 95 78.4 4.5 (69.5–87.3)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 54 NA NA —
Hinds County, Mississippi 111 67.3 5.0 (57.4–77.2)
Rankin County, Mississippi 67 NA NA —
Jackson County, Missouri 150 66.3 4.3 (57.8–74.8)
St. Louis County, Missouri 88 NA NA —
St. Louis city, Missouri 158 NA NA —
Cascade County, Montana 127 66.3 4.7 (57.2–75.4)
Flathead County, Montana 130 61.2 4.9 (51.6–70.8)
Missoula County, Montana 113 73.4 4.6 (64.4–82.4)
Yellowstone County, Montana 107 80.4 4.1 (72.5–88.3)
Douglas County, Nebraska 214 68.1 3.6 (61.1–75.1)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 185 74.1 3.5 (67.2–81.0)
Sarpy County, Nebraska NA NA NA —
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 178 57.8 4.1 (49.8–65.8)
Clark County, Nevada 282 69.5 3.1 (63.4–75.6)
Washoe County, Nevada 261 69.9 3.2 (63.7–76.1)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 113 67.2 4.9 (57.6–76.8)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 114 78.9 4.2 (70.7–87.1)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 270 67.4 3.2 (61.2–73.6)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 148 64.8 4.5 (56.0–73.6)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 212 66.1 3.6 (59.0–73.2)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 125 58.4 4.8 (49.0–67.8)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 148 67.0 4.4 (58.3–75.7)
Bergen County, New Jersey 271 61.7 3.5 (54.8–68.6)
Burlington County, New Jersey 162 79.8 3.6 (72.8–86.8)
Camden County, New Jersey 193 71.3 3.9 (63.6–79.0)
Cape May County, New Jersey 197 67.4 3.7 (60.1–74.7)
Essex County, New Jersey 229 58.8 4.0 (51.0–66.6)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 142 78.4 3.8 (71.0–85.8)
Hudson County, New Jersey 187 45.0 4.5 (36.2–53.8)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 125 66.5 5.0 (56.8–76.2)
Mercer County, New Jersey 134 77.2 3.9 (69.6–84.8)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 188 81.8 3.2 (75.5–88.1)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 225 61.5 3.7 (54.2–68.8)
Morris County, New Jersey 201 59.7 4.0 (51.8–67.6)
Ocean County, New Jersey 294 75.8 2.8 (70.3–81.3)
Passaic County, New Jersey 226 62.0 4.2 (53.7–70.3)
Somerset County, New Jersey 138 73.2 4.2 (64.9–81.5)
Sussex County, New Jersey 136 73.7 4.2 (65.6–81.8)
Union County, New Jersey 131 51.2 5.1 (41.2–61.2)
Warren County, New Jersey 156 72.7 4.4 (64.2–81.2)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 272 70.8 3.2 (64.5–77.1)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 130 59.1 4.8 (49.7–68.5)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 85 NA NA —
San Juan County, New Mexico 88 NA NA —

TABLE 21. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 121 NA NA —
Kings County, New York 106 NA NA —
Nassau County, New York 94 NA NA —
New York County, New York 124 NA NA —
Queens County, New York 83 NA NA —
Suffolk County, New York 79 NA NA —
Westchester County, New York 70 NA NA —
Buncombe County, North Carolina 104 73.9 4.9 (64.3–83.5)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 92 73.5 5.1 (63.5–83.5)
Catawba County, North Carolina 111 67.6 4.9 (58.1–77.1)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 87 NA NA —
Durham County, North Carolina 76 NA NA —
Forsyth County, North Carolina 122 73.6 4.1 (65.6–81.6)
Gaston County, North Carolina 123 66.4 4.7 (57.2–75.6)
Guilford County, North Carolina 123 66.6 4.7 (57.3–75.9)
Johnston County, North Carolina 103 66.5 4.9 (57.0–76.0)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 174 60.2 4.3 (51.8–68.6)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 120 71.1 4.4 (62.5–79.7)
Orange County, North Carolina 75 79.3 4.7 (70.0–88.6)
Randolph County, North Carolina 108 NA NA —
Union County, North Carolina 84 NA NA —
Wake County, North Carolina 112 NA NA —
Burleigh County, North Dakota 93 NA NA —
Cass County, North Dakota 141 69.9 4.2 (61.6–78.2)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 107 NA NA —
Hamilton County, Ohio 101 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 131 NA NA —
Lucas County, Ohio 165 63.1 4.7 (53.8–72.4)
Mahoning County, Ohio 270 63.5 3.6 (56.4–70.6)
Montgomery County, Ohio 233 68.2 3.7 (60.9–75.5)
Summit County, Ohio 188 72.2 4.1 (64.2–80.2)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 88 NA NA —
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 339 73.7 2.8 (68.2–79.2)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 393 68.4 2.6 (63.3–73.5)
Clackamas County, Oregon 103 69.8 4.9 (60.2–79.4)
Lane County, Oregon 138 73.6 4.2 (65.4–81.8)
Multnomah County, Oregon 160 74.7 3.8 (67.3–82.1)
Washington County, Oregon 86 NA NA —
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 145 75.8 3.7 (68.5–83.1)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 686 64.2 4.2 (56.0–72.4)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 735 59.0 4.9 (49.4–68.6)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 76 NA NA —
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 394 NA NA —
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 91 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 168 72.8 3.8 (65.3–80.3)
Newport County, Rhode Island 104 66.2 4.9 (56.5–75.9)
Providence County, Rhode Island 729 71.6 1.9 (67.9–75.3)
Washington County, Rhode Island 137 72.7 4.1 (64.8–80.6)
Aiken County, South Carolina 163 59.3 4.3 (50.9–67.7)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 212 68.0 3.4 (61.3–74.7)
Berkeley County, South Carolina NA NA NA —
Charleston County, South Carolina 143 70.0 4.4 (61.3–78.7)
Greenville County, South Carolina 134 62.6 4.7 (53.3–71.9)
Horry County, South Carolina 236 65.7 3.3 (59.2–72.2)
Lexington County, South Carolina 79 NA NA —
Richland County, South Carolina 85 NA NA —
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 160 65.8 4.3 (57.4–74.2)
Pennington County, South Dakota 187 68.8 3.7 (61.6–76.0)
Davidson County, Tennessee 74 NA NA —
Shelby County, Tennessee 53 NA NA —
Bexar County, Texas 100 NA NA —
Dallas County, Texas 85 NA NA —
El Paso County, Texas 116 NA NA —
Harris County, Texas 68 NA NA —
Lubbock County, Texas 172 75.7 3.7 (68.5–82.9)
Tarrant County, Texas 100 NA NA —
Travis County, Texas 57 NA NA —
Davis County, Utah 75 NA NA —
Salt Lake County, Utah 314 65.5 3.1 (59.5–71.5)

TABLE 21. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah NA NA NA —
Tooele County, Utah 53 NA NA —
Utah County, Utah 92 NA NA —
Weber County, Utah 100 NA NA —
Chittenden County, Vermont 314 68.7 2.8 (63.1–74.3)
Franklin County, Vermont 114 NA NA —
Orange County, Vermont 105 70.0 4.7 (60.8–79.2)
Rutland County, Vermont 198 61.1 3.8 (53.6–68.6)
Washington County, Vermont 167 65.3 4.0 (57.5–73.1)
Windsor County, Vermont 187 67.8 3.6 (60.7–74.9)
Asotin County, Washington 117 NA NA —
Benton County, Washington 88 NA NA —
Chelan County, Washington 174 67.3 3.8 (59.8–74.8)
Clark County, Washington 353 72.6 2.7 (67.3–77.9)
Douglas County, Washington 149 62.2 4.3 (53.8–70.6)
Franklin County, Washington 69 NA NA —
King County, Washington 694 68.5 1.9 (64.7–72.3)
Kitsap County, Washington 218 73.5 3.3 (67.0–80.0)
Pierce County, Washington 377 69.8 2.5 (64.8–74.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 345 71.4 2.7 (66.1–76.7)
Spokane County, Washington 298 71.6 3.0 (65.8–77.4)
Thurston County, Washington 373 67.4 2.7 (62.0–72.8)
Yakima County, Washington 206 68.1 3.6 (61.1–75.1)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 129 77.0 4.0 (69.2–84.8)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 168 NA NA —
Laramie County, Wyoming 183 70.2 3.7 (63.0–77.4)
Natrona County, Wyoming 146 73.7 4.0 (65.9–81.5)
Median 68.0
Range 42.2–82.1
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
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Table 22

TABLE 22. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by state/territory —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 1,859 53.3 1.3 (50.7–55.9)
Alaska 881 55.2 2.4 (50.4–60.0)
Arizona 2,731 56.6 1.7 (53.3–59.9)
Arkansas 3,189 52.6 1.0 (50.7–54.5)
California 2,798 57.1 1.3 (54.6–59.6)
Colorado 2,977 57.2 1.0 (55.2–59.2)
Connecticut 4,550 68.7 0.9 (67.0–70.4)
Delaware 2,154 68.4 1.4 (65.7–71.1)
District of Columbia 1,858 64.7 1.4 (62.0–67.4)
Florida 6,184 58.9 0.9 (57.2–60.6)
Georgia 3,960 57.0 1.0 (55.0–59.0)
Hawaii 3,477 54.1 1.1 (51.9–56.3)
Idaho 2,686 54.2 1.1 (52.0–56.4)
Illinois 2,773 55.6 1.1 (53.4–57.8)
Indiana 3,368 56.4 1.0 (54.5–58.3)
Iowa 2,954 55.8 1.0 (53.8–57.8)
Kansas 4,606 56.5 0.8 (54.9–58.1)
Kentucky 3,249 58.6 1.2 (56.3–60.9)
Louisiana 3,581 49.8 1.0 (47.9–51.7)
Maine 2,169 64.2 1.2 (61.9–66.5)
Maryland 4,639 66.7 1.0 (64.8–68.6)
Massachusetts 6,350 66.3 0.8 (64.7–67.9)
Michigan 3,176 66.1 1.0 (64.2–68.0)
Minnesota 2,311 68.2 1.1 (66.1–70.3)
Mississippi 3,440 50.4 1.0 (48.5–52.3)
Missouri 2,973 57.8 1.4 (55.1–60.5)
Montana 3,373 52.9 1.0 (50.9–54.9)
Nebraska 4,495 51.4 1.0 (49.5–53.3)
Nevada 1,892 55.2 1.7 (51.9–58.5)
New Hampshire 3,201 63.6 1.0 (61.7–65.5)
New Jersey 7,305 58.3 0.8 (56.8–59.8)
New Mexico 3,519 52.9 1.0 (50.9–54.9)
New York 3,158 63.9 1.0 (61.8–66.0)
North Carolina 8,682 61.8 0.7 (60.5–63.1)
North Dakota 2,669 56.5 1.2 (54.2–58.8)
Ohio 3,235 57.1 1.6 (54.0–60.2)
Oklahoma 3,958 51.7 0.9 (49.9–53.5)
Oregon 2,835 60.7 1.0 (58.7–62.7)
Pennsylvania 7,307 58.8 1.0 (56.8–60.8)
Rhode Island 2,427 69.2 1.1 (67.1–71.3)
South Carolina 5,178 59.5 0.9 (57.8–61.2)
South Dakota 3,721 55.9 1.0 (54.0–57.8)
Tennessee 2,463 56.2 1.3 (53.6–58.8)
Texas 3,549 56.3 1.4 (53.6–59.0)
Utah 2,372 62.7 1.2 (60.3–65.1)
Vermont 4,013 64.8 0.8 (63.2–66.4)
Virginia 2,924 65.3 1.3 (62.7–67.9)
Washington 13,925 63.7 0.6 (62.6–64.8)
West Virginia 2,207 53.4 1.2 (51.1–55.7)
Wisconsin 2,428 64.0 1.2 (61.7–66.3)
Wyoming 2,739 52.6 1.0 (50.5–54.7)
Puerto Rico 2,594 37.8 1.1 (35.7–39.9)
U.S.Virgin Islands 1,400 37.8 1.5 (34.8–40.8)
Median 57.1
Range 37.8–69.2
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
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Table 23

TABLE 23. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 392 58.5 4.4 (49.8–67.2)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 957 57.5 1.9 (53.9–61.1)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 465 63.5 3.6 (56.4–70.6)
Asheville, North Carolina 340 63.4 3.1 (57.3–69.5)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 1,478 59.2 1.7 (55.9–62.5)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 292 57.0 3.4 (50.3–63.7)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 509 58.2 2.6 (53.0–63.4)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 253 62.9 3.4 (56.2–69.6)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 1,619 68.0 1.4 (65.2–70.8)
Barre, Vermont 415 72.4 2.5 (67.5–77.3)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 558 55.7 2.4 (51.1–60.3)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 888 67.8 2.2 (63.6–72.0)
Billings, Montana 274 55.3 3.3 (48.8–61.8)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 475 56.5 2.6 (51.4–61.6)
Bismarck, North Dakota 289 54.7 3.2 (48.4–61.0)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 623 55.8 2.3 (51.4–60.2)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 1,166 69.0 1.7 (65.7–72.3)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 513 65.7 2.4 (61.0–70.4)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 1,332 68.2 1.7 (64.9–71.5)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,075 70.9 1.5 (67.9–73.9)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 1,133 64.5 2.0 (60.6–68.4)
Camden, New Jersey§ 970 60.0 1.9 (56.3–63.7)
Casper, Wyoming 313 59.8 3.0 (53.9–65.7)
Charleston, West Virginia 419 58.3 2.7 (53.1–63.5)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 561 63.9 2.3 (59.3–68.5)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,185 63.8 1.8 (60.3–67.3)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 394 57.6 2.8 (52.2–63.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 1,851 53.3 1.5 (50.4–56.2)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 494 60.9 4.2 (52.7–69.1)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 553 65.9 3.6 (58.8–73.0)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 367 62.3 2.8 (56.9–67.7)
Columbia, South Carolina 537 65.6 2.3 (61.0–70.2)
Concord, New Hampshire 356 63.7 2.8 (58.1–69.3)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 254 59.9 4.9 (50.3–69.5)
Dayton, Ohio 460 66.7 4.1 (58.7–74.7)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 1,376 57.3 1.5 (54.4–60.2)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 478 61.1 2.5 (56.1–66.1)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 459 66.0 2.7 (60.7–71.3)
Dover, Delaware 690 68.2 2.0 (64.2–72.2)
Durham, North Carolina 534 69.6 2.3 (65.0–74.2)
Edison, New Jersey§ 1,607 58.2 1.5 (55.2–61.2)
El Paso, Texas 245 47.9 3.8 (40.5–55.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 849 64.9 2.5 (60.1–69.7)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 315 63.7 3.0 (57.7–69.7)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 343 68.6 4.2 (60.4–76.8)
Farmington, New Mexico 242 46.8 4.1 (38.7–54.9)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 250 71.2 3.4 (64.5–77.9)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 408 51.2 3.3 (44.8–57.6)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 239 56.7 4.7 (47.4–66.0)
Great Falls, Montana 302 60.9 3.1 (54.8–67.0)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 534 65.8 2.7 (60.4–71.2)
Greenville, South Carolina 468 62.5 2.5 (57.5–67.5)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 347 61.0 3.3 (54.5–67.5)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 1,431 71.5 1.4 (68.8–74.2)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 375 55.9 3.4 (49.2–62.6)
Hilo, Hawaii 826 50.9 2.0 (47.1–54.7)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 461 63.7 2.6 (58.7–68.7)
Honolulu, Hawaii 1,513 55.4 1.5 (52.4–58.4)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 236 NAķ NA —
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 284 58.6 3.9 (51.0–66.2)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 982 64.3 1.8 (60.7–67.9)
Jackson, Mississippi 546 57.9 2.5 (53.0–62.8)
Jacksonville, Florida 373 55.3 3.4 (48.6–62.0)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 777 48.5 2.3 (44.0–53.0)
Kalispell, Montana 298 52.7 3.4 (46.0–59.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1,719 63.4 1.5 (60.4–66.4)
Kapaa, Hawaii 361 55.7 3.2 (49.5–61.9)
Keene, New Hampshire 287 57.4 3.2 (51.1–63.7)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 349 59.7 3.3 (53.1–66.3)

TABLE 23. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 273 52.1 3.5 (45.3–58.9)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 605 55.0 2.3 (50.4–59.6)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 911 63.6 1.8 (60.1–67.1)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 372 65.8 2.9 (60.1–71.5)
Lincoln, Nebraska 435 54.7 2.7 (49.5–59.9)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 654 66.2 2.1 (62.1–70.3)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 351 51.4 3.4 (44.8–58.0)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 467 63.4 2.6 (58.3–68.5)
Lubbock, Texas 300 62.7 3.6 (55.7–69.7)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 691 65.0 2.0 (61.1–68.9)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 410 48.6 3.5 (41.8–55.4)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 1,153 55.7 1.8 (52.2–59.2)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 649 59.8 2.7 (54.4–65.2)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,244 67.9 1.5 (65.0–70.8)
Missoula, Montana 281 61.5 3.4 (54.9–68.1)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 451 55.4 2.6 (50.4–60.4)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 323 56.0 3.3 (49.6–62.4)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 381 64.3 2.8 (58.7–69.9)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 1,813 57.6 1.7 (54.3–60.9)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,095 65.7 1.9 (61.9–69.5)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 773 49.8 2.2 (45.5–54.1)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 2,403 63.8 1.5 (60.9–66.7)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 329 67.9 3.1 (61.9–73.9)
Ocean City, New Jersey 365 63.0 2.9 (57.3–68.7)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 382 66.9 2.7 (61.5–72.3)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,123 53.8 1.7 (50.4–57.2)
Olympia, Washington 903 64.9 1.9 (61.3–68.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 853 56.0 1.9 (52.2–59.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 407 59.8 2.9 (54.1–65.5)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 1,318 66.7 2.2 (62.5–70.9)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 733 56.4 2.5 (51.4–61.4)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2,084 58.1 2.2 (53.7–62.5)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 656 69.7 2.0 (65.8–73.6)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 2,006 63.2 1.5 (60.3–66.1)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 3,555 67.8 1.0 (65.8–69.8)
Provo-Orem, Utah 221 53.8 3.7 (46.6–61.0)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 580 69.6 2.5 (64.7–74.5)
Rapid City, South Dakota 512 59.8 2.3 (55.2–64.4)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 671 58.8 2.1 (54.6–63.0)
Richmond, Virginia 442 62.8 2.8 (57.3–68.3)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 316 54.4 3.5 (47.5–61.3)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 815 65.3 1.9 (61.5–69.1)
Rutland, Vermont 419 58.9 2.6 (53.8–64.0)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 857 61.5 2.6 (56.4–66.6)
Salt Lake City, Utah 947 65.8 1.9 (62.1–69.5)
San Antonio, Texas 285 55.9 3.5 (49.1–62.7)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 274 52.0 3.5 (45.2–58.8)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 390 63.9 3.6 (56.9–70.9)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 335 51.9 3.1 (45.8–58.0)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 348 44.9 3.0 (39.0–50.8)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 1,546 57.7 3.3 (51.3–64.1)
Seaford, Delaware 806 70.7 1.8 (67.2–74.2)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 2,509 65.7 1.3 (63.2–68.2)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 326 51.6 3.2 (45.3–57.9)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 474 57.8 2.6 (52.8–62.8)
Spokane, Washington 699 59.6 2.2 (55.4–63.8)
Springfield, Massachusetts 852 63.7 2.4 (59.0–68.4)
Tacoma, Washington§ 871 65.3 1.9 (61.6–69.0)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 629 60.7 2.3 (56.3–65.1)
Toledo, Ohio 409 56.1 4.3 (47.6–64.6)
Topeka, Kansas 443 64.1 2.6 (59.1–69.1)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 282 64.7 3.2 (58.4–71.0)
Tucson, Arizona 480 61.6 2.7 (56.3–66.9)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,091 53.3 1.8 (49.7–56.9)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 585 70.9 2.5 (65.9–75.9)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 648 65.9 2.1 (61.8–70.0)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia§ 2,899 66.8 2.9 (61.1–72.5)
Wenatchee, Washington 655 61.0 2.3 (56.5–65.5)

TABLE 23. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 898 57.2 1.9 (53.6–60.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 913 65.4 1.9 (61.7–69.1)
Wilmington, North Carolina 440 65.7 2.8 (60.2–71.2)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 357 63.0 2.8 (57.4–68.6)
Worcester, Massachusetts 826 64.5 2.4 (59.8–69.2)
Yakima, Washington 419 57.4 2.7 (52.0–62.8)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 564 NA NA —
Yuma, Arizona 288 50.7 3.3 (44.2–57.2)
Median 61.0
Range 44.9–72.4
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
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Table 24

TABLE 24. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 290 58.4 3.3 (52.0–64.8)
Maricopa County, Arizona 466 56.6 2.7 (51.2–62.0)
Pima County, Arizona 480 61.6 2.7 (56.3–66.9)
Pinal County, Arizona 267 53.3 4.2 (45.0–61.6)
Yuma County, Arizona 288 50.7 3.3 (44.2–57.2)
Benton County, Arkansas 205 55.8 3.9 (48.2–63.4)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 373 65.3 2.8 (59.8–70.8)
Washington County, Arkansas 170 51.0 4.2 (42.8–59.2)
Alameda County, California 132 NA§ NA —
Los Angeles County, California 351 51.4 3.4 (44.8–58.0)
Riverside County, California 174 59.9 4.5 (51.2–68.6)
San Bernardino County, California 142 52.7 5.0 (43.0–62.4)
San Diego County, California 274 52.0 3.5 (45.2–58.8)
Adams County, Colorado 187 51.4 4.0 (43.5–59.3)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 312 58.3 3.2 (52.0–64.6)
Denver County, Colorado 317 56.5 3.1 (50.3–62.7)
Douglas County, Colorado 107 NA NA —
El Paso County, Colorado 347 64.0 2.8 (58.5–69.5)
Jefferson County, Colorado 377 60.5 2.7 (55.1–65.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 1,332 68.2 1.7 (64.9–71.5)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,034 71.9 1.6 (68.7–75.1)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 208 72.3 3.6 (65.2–79.4)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,095 65.7 1.9 (61.9–69.5)
New London County, Connecticut 329 67.9 3.1 (61.9–73.9)
Tolland County, Connecticut 189 68.0 3.8 (60.5–75.5)
Kent County, Delaware 690 68.2 2.0 (64.2–72.2)
New Castle County, Delaware 658 67.6 2.1 (63.5–71.7)
Sussex County, Delaware 806 70.7 1.8 (67.2–74.2)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 1,858 64.8 1.4 (62.1–67.5)
Broward County, Florida 378 57.5 3.1 (51.5–63.5)
Duval County, Florida 161 56.3 4.8 (46.9–65.7)
Hillsborough County, Florida 243 51.9 4.0 (44.2–59.6)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 457 45.0 2.8 (39.6–50.4)
Orange County, Florida 188 63.6 4.2 (55.4–71.8)
Palm Beach County, Florida 318 68.1 3.1 (62.0–74.2)
Pinellas County, Florida 216 68.8 3.7 (61.6–76.0)
Clayton County, Georgia 169 51.4 4.8 (41.9–60.9)
Cobb County, Georgia 193 60.9 4.1 (52.9–68.9)
DeKalb County, Georgia 233 63.4 3.9 (55.8–71.0)
Fulton County, Georgia 214 67.6 4.0 (59.8–75.4)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 154 56.2 4.6 (47.3–65.1)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 826 50.9 2.0 (47.1–54.7)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 1,513 55.4 1.5 (52.4–58.4)
Kauai County, Hawaii 361 55.7 3.2 (49.5–61.9)
Maui County, Hawaii 777 48.5 2.3 (44.0–53.0)
Ada County, Idaho 312 60.1 3.2 (53.9–66.3)
Canyon County, Idaho 236 52.6 3.6 (45.6–59.6)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 151 67.5 4.1 (59.5–75.5)
Cook County, Illinois 842 53.3 2.1 (49.1–57.5)
DuPage County, Illinois 174 57.8 4.2 (49.5–66.1)
Lake County, Illinois 130 48.5 5.0 (38.7–58.3)
Lake County, Indiana 281 43.9 3.6 (36.8–51.0)
Marion County, Indiana 628 62.3 2.3 (57.8–66.8)
Polk County, Iowa 363 62.4 2.9 (56.6–68.2)
Johnson County, Kansas 738 69.7 1.9 (66.0–73.4)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 673 59.1 2.1 (54.9–63.3)
Shawnee County, Kansas 315 66.6 3.0 (60.6–72.6)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 170 52.7 4.4 (44.0–61.4)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 250 68.9 3.6 (61.9–75.9)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 201 50.1 4.1 (42.1–58.1)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 328 58.5 3.0 (52.5–64.5)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 354 49.0 3.1 (43.0–55.0)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 154 45.8 4.7 (36.6–55.0)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 192 55.1 4.2 (46.9–63.3)
Cumberland County, Maine 347 74.9 2.6 (69.8–80.0)
York County, Maine 231 64.4 3.5 (57.6–71.2)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 293 72.7 3.1 (66.6–78.8)
Baltimore County, Maryland 515 65.7 2.4 (61.0–70.4)
Carroll County, Maryland 132 NA NA —

TABLE 24. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 148 56.7 4.5 (47.9–65.5)
Charles County, Maryland 129 64.3 4.8 (54.8–73.8)
Frederick County, Maryland 280 69.0 3.1 (63.0–75.0)
Harford County, Maryland 150 67.8 4.3 (59.3–76.3)
Howard County, Maryland 139 75.2 4.2 (67.0–83.4)
Montgomery County, Maryland 608 67.1 2.6 (62.0–72.2)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 316 64.0 3.4 (57.4–70.6)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 139 71.0 4.3 (62.6–79.4)
Washington County, Maryland 235 61.1 3.7 (53.8–68.4)
Baltimore city, Maryland 251 64.8 3.5 (57.9–71.7)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 1,128 62.3 2.6 (57.2–67.4)
Essex County, Massachusetts 849 66.3 2.4 (61.5–71.1)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 681 61.5 3.0 (55.6–67.4)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,133 65.4 1.9 (61.7–69.1)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 353 69.2 2.9 (63.6–74.8)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 259 72.3 3.1 (66.3–78.3)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 554 66.0 2.6 (60.8–71.2)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 826 64.5 2.4 (59.8–69.2)
Macomb County, Michigan 209 62.7 3.9 (55.1–70.3)
Oakland County, Michigan 319 68.5 3.0 (62.5–74.5)
Wayne County, Michigan 459 66.0 2.7 (60.7–71.3)
Dakota County, Minnesota 149 66.9 4.3 (58.4–75.4)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 473 71.4 2.3 (66.9–75.9)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 213 64.9 3.8 (57.4–72.4)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 127 NA NA —
Hinds County, Mississippi 239 59.9 3.7 (52.6–67.2)
Rankin County, Mississippi 142 58.0 4.7 (48.8–67.2)
Jackson County, Missouri 286 64.3 3.5 (57.5–71.1)
St. Louis County, Missouri 172 NA NA —
St. Louis city, Missouri 324 63.1 4.7 (53.8–72.4)
Cascade County, Montana 302 60.9 3.1 (54.8–67.0)
Flathead County, Montana 298 52.7 3.4 (46.0–59.4)
Missoula County, Montana 281 61.5 3.4 (54.9–68.1)
Yellowstone County, Montana 242 55.3 3.5 (48.4–62.2)
Douglas County, Nebraska 470 56.9 2.6 (51.9–61.9)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 405 54.4 2.7 (49.0–59.8)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 122 60.4 4.7 (51.1–69.7)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 340 44.7 3.1 (38.7–50.7)
Clark County, Nevada 605 55.0 2.3 (50.4–59.6)
Washoe County, Nevada 662 59.4 2.2 (55.2–63.6)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 287 57.4 3.2 (51.1–63.7)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 260 66.2 3.2 (59.9–72.5)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 691 65.0 2.0 (61.1–68.9)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 356 63.7 2.8 (58.1–69.3)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 513 65.5 2.4 (60.8–70.2)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 302 65.1 3.1 (59.0–71.2)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 292 57.0 3.4 (50.3–63.7)
Bergen County, New Jersey 557 62.8 2.4 (58.1–67.5)
Burlington County, New Jersey 315 62.8 3.1 (56.7–68.9)
Camden County, New Jersey 367 58.9 3.0 (53.0–64.8)
Cape May County, New Jersey 365 63.0 2.9 (57.3–68.7)
Essex County, New Jersey 534 58.3 2.7 (53.0–63.6)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 288 56.7 3.5 (49.8–63.6)
Hudson County, New Jersey 380 48.1 3.5 (41.2–55.0)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 285 59.5 3.5 (52.7–66.3)
Mercer County, New Jersey 282 64.7 3.2 (58.4–71.0)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 409 48.0 3.1 (41.9–54.1)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 415 61.8 2.7 (56.4–67.2)
Morris County, New Jersey 410 64.8 2.8 (59.3–70.3)
Ocean County, New Jersey 489 62.1 2.5 (57.1–67.1)
Passaic County, New Jersey 462 56.4 3.4 (49.8–63.0)
Somerset County, New Jersey 294 65.2 3.4 (58.5–71.9)
Sussex County, New Jersey 313 53.9 3.3 (47.4–60.4)
Union County, New Jersey 255 57.2 3.6 (50.1–64.3)
Warren County, New Jersey 295 53.5 3.6 (46.5–60.5)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 613 59.0 2.2 (54.6–63.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 273 52.1 3.5 (45.3–58.9)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 189 55.4 4.5 (46.6–64.2)
San Juan County, New Mexico 242 46.8 4.1 (38.7–54.9)

TABLE 24. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 335 51.9 3.1 (45.8–58.0)
Kings County, New York 210 61.2 3.9 (53.6–68.8)
Nassau County, New York 189 70.8 3.7 (63.5–78.1)
New York County, New York 244 62.2 3.9 (54.5–69.9)
Queens County, New York 199 62.4 4.1 (54.4–70.4)
Suffolk County, New York 192 59.1 4.1 (51.0–67.2)
Westchester County, New York 149 83.6 3.3 (77.1–90.1)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 215 63.3 3.6 (56.1–70.5)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 214 62.5 3.7 (55.2–69.8)
Catawba County, North Carolina 237 54.1 3.7 (46.8–61.4)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 207 71.6 3.7 (64.4–78.8)
Durham County, North Carolina 187 73.0 3.6 (65.9–80.1)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 246 68.1 3.3 (61.6–74.6)
Gaston County, North Carolina 224 66.1 3.6 (59.1–73.1)
Guilford County, North Carolina 245 68.1 3.8 (60.7–75.5)
Johnston County, North Carolina 222 59.9 4.1 (51.9–67.9)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 380 66.4 2.9 (60.8–72.0)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 247 70.0 3.5 (63.2–76.8)
Orange County, North Carolina 192 71.9 3.5 (65.0–78.8)
Randolph County, North Carolina 223 59.1 3.9 (51.5–66.7)
Union County, North Carolina 207 65.0 4.1 (57.0–73.0)
Wake County, North Carolina 300 73.5 3.0 (67.5–79.5)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 203 55.9 3.8 (48.5–63.3)
Cass County, North Dakota 316 63.5 3.1 (57.4–69.6)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 235 72.7 4.5 (63.8–81.6)
Hamilton County, Ohio 211 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 274 55.7 4.6 (46.7–64.7)
Lucas County, Ohio 380 55.9 3.2 (49.6–62.2)
Mahoning County, Ohio 511 50.1 3.6 (43.1–57.1)
Montgomery County, Ohio 427 69.9 3.0 (64.1–75.7)
Summit County, Ohio 375 62.2 3.5 (55.3–69.1)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 182 55.7 4.3 (47.2–64.2)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 668 54.1 2.2 (49.7–58.5)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 783 54.5 2.1 (50.4–58.6)
Clackamas County, Oregon 250 59.4 3.5 (52.5–66.3)
Lane County, Oregon 315 63.7 3.0 (57.7–69.7)
Multnomah County, Oregon 391 62.9 2.8 (57.5–68.3)
Washington County, Oregon 247 63.6 3.5 (56.6–70.6)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 291 59.9 3.2 (53.6–66.2)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 1,398 52.9 2.3 (48.4–57.4)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 1,461 55.4 3.2 (49.2–61.6)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 172 72.2 3.9 (64.7–79.7)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 843 63.4 3.8 (56.0–70.8)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 174 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 358 68.6 2.8 (63.1–74.1)
Newport County, Rhode Island 217 73.1 3.3 (66.5–79.7)
Providence County, Rhode Island 1,460 65.8 1.5 (62.9–68.7)
Washington County, Rhode Island 284 78.9 2.6 (73.8–84.0)
Aiken County, South Carolina 314 60.7 3.1 (54.7–66.7)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 425 66.3 2.6 (61.3–71.3)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 134 54.1 4.8 (44.8–63.4)
Charleston County, South Carolina 324 70.7 3.0 (64.9–76.5)
Greenville County, South Carolina 286 65.5 3.2 (59.3–71.7)
Horry County, South Carolina 451 55.4 2.6 (50.4–60.4)
Lexington County, South Carolina 169 70.9 3.9 (63.2–78.6)
Richland County, South Carolina 221 66.4 3.4 (59.7–73.1)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 348 58.6 3.0 (52.7–64.5)
Pennington County, South Dakota 395 60.4 2.7 (55.1–65.7)
Davidson County, Tennessee 153 57.0 5.0 (47.2–66.8)
Shelby County, Tennessee 141 50.7 4.9 (41.2–60.2)
Bexar County, Texas 207 57.3 4.1 (49.3–65.3)
Dallas County, Texas 190 NA NA —
El Paso County, Texas 245 47.9 3.8 (40.5–55.3)
Harris County, Texas 161 NA NA —
Lubbock County, Texas 289 64.2 3.7 (56.9–71.5)
Tarrant County, Texas 210 62.4 5.0 (52.5–72.3)
Travis County, Texas 146 64.4 4.6 (55.3–73.5)
Davis County, Utah 173 67.0 3.9 (59.3–74.7)
Salt Lake County, Utah 730 65.8 2.0 (61.9–69.7)

TABLE 24. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 100 NA NA —
Tooele County, Utah 117 68.6 4.6 (59.5–77.7)
Utah County, Utah 207 54.1 3.8 (46.7–61.5)
Weber County, Utah 201 67.2 3.7 (59.9–74.5)
Chittenden County, Vermont 778 73.4 1.7 (70.0–76.8)
Franklin County, Vermont 236 63.9 3.5 (57.0–70.8)
Orange County, Vermont 218 59.0 3.7 (51.7–66.3)
Rutland County, Vermont 419 58.9 2.6 (53.8–64.0)
Washington County, Vermont 415 72.4 2.5 (67.5–77.3)
Windsor County, Vermont 433 63.7 2.5 (58.7–68.7)
Asotin County, Washington 221 63.5 3.7 (56.2–70.8)
Benton County, Washington 200 61.3 3.9 (53.6–69.0)
Chelan County, Washington 352 61.5 2.9 (55.7–67.3)
Clark County, Washington 827 69.1 1.8 (65.5–72.7)
Douglas County, Washington 303 60.5 3.3 (54.0–67.0)
Franklin County, Washington 149 51.7 4.8 (42.4–61.0)
King County, Washington 1,694 66.6 1.3 (64.1–69.1)
Kitsap County, Washington 513 65.7 2.4 (61.0–70.4)
Pierce County, Washington 871 65.4 1.8 (61.8–69.0)
Snohomish County, Washington 815 66.4 2.0 (62.6–70.2)
Spokane County, Washington 699 59.6 2.2 (55.4–63.8)
Thurston County, Washington 903 64.9 1.9 (61.3–68.5)
Yakima County, Washington 419 57.4 2.7 (52.0–62.8)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 274 60.6 3.3 (54.2–67.0)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 447 60.6 3.7 (53.3–67.9)
Laramie County, Wyoming 394 57.6 2.8 (52.2–63.0)
Natrona County, Wyoming 313 59.8 3.0 (53.9–65.7)
Median 62.2
Range 43.9–83.6
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 25

TABLE 25. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by state/
territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 1,832 23.1 1.1 (20.9–25.3)
Alaska 871 17.0 1.9 (13.4–20.6)
Arizona 2,707 28.8 1.5 (25.9–31.7)
Arkansas 3,191 22.6 0.8 (21.0–24.2)
California 2,788 23.2 1.0 (21.2–25.2)
Colorado 2,938 28.8 0.9 (27.0–30.6)
Connecticut 4,468 26.9 0.8 (25.3–28.5)
Delaware 2,124 22.5 1.2 (20.2–24.8)
District of Columbia 1,828 32.5 1.3 (29.9–35.1)
Florida 6,100 29.8 0.8 (28.3–31.3)
Georgia 3,897 26.6 0.9 (24.8–28.4)
Hawaii 3,454 28.0 1.0 (26.1–29.9)
Idaho 2,663 20.5 0.9 (18.7–22.3)
Illinois 2,751 19.9 0.9 (18.2–21.6)
Indiana 3,351 21.1 0.8 (19.5–22.7)
Iowa 2,928 24.9 0.9 (23.2–26.6)
Kansas 4,534 25.2 0.7 (23.8–26.6)
Kentucky 3,175 19.7 1.0 (17.8–21.6)
Louisiana 3,490 24.2 0.8 (22.6–25.8)
Maine 2,135 32.5 1.1 (30.3–34.7)
Maryland 4,533 29.3 0.9 (27.5–31.1)
Massachusetts 6,262 28.4 0.8 (26.8–30.0)
Michigan 3,141 27.3 0.9 (25.5–29.1)
Minnesota 2,283 24.1 1.0 (22.2–26.0)
Mississippi 3,387 21.8 0.8 (20.2–23.4)
Missouri 2,952 20.7 1.1 (18.5–22.9)
Montana 3,347 27.9 0.9 (26.1–29.7)
Nebraska 4,460 27.9 0.9 (26.2–29.6)
Nevada 1,881 23.9 1.4 (21.2–26.6)
New Hampshire 3,159 30.5 1.0 (28.6–32.4)
New Jersey 7,210 21.3 0.6 (20.1–22.5)
New Mexico 3,500 21.0 0.9 (19.3–22.7)
New York 3,123 23.0 0.9 (21.3–24.7)
North Carolina 8,496 31.3 0.6 (30.1–32.5)
North Dakota 2,656 22.2 1.0 (20.3–24.1)
Ohio 3,203 23.4 1.4 (20.7–26.1)
Oklahoma 3,927 20.6 0.7 (19.2–22.0)
Oregon 2,788 29.9 0.9 (28.0–31.8)
Pennsylvania 7,224 22.0 0.9 (20.3–23.7)
Rhode Island 2,388 26.0 1.0 (24.0–28.0)
South Carolina 5,119 24.2 0.7 (22.7–25.7)
South Dakota 3,679 22.7 0.8 (21.1–24.3)
Tennessee 2,426 25.6 1.1 (23.4–27.8)
Texas 3,498 21.7 1.1 (19.5–23.9)
Utah 2,353 12.1 0.8 (10.5–13.7)
Vermont 3,960 26.1 0.8 (24.6–27.6)
Virginia 2,865 26.3 1.5 (23.4–29.2)
Washington 13,700 31.5 0.5 (30.5–32.5)
West Virginia 2,177 25.2 1.0 (23.2–27.2)
Wisconsin 2,409 22.1 1.0 (20.1–24.1)
Wyoming 2,713 18.2 0.8 (16.6–19.8)
Puerto Rico 2,625 5.1 0.5 (4.1–6.1)
U.S.Virgin Islands 1,397 14.8 1.1 (12.6–17.0)
Median 24.1
Range 5.1–32.5
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 26

TABLE 26. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 388 25.3 4.0 (17.5–33.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 943 23.7 1.6 (20.6–26.8)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 461 15.7 2.5 (10.7–20.7)
Asheville, North Carolina 332 36.1 3.1 (30.0–42.2)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 1,458 28.8 1.5 (25.9–31.7)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 289 28.2 3.2 (21.9–34.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 496 26.1 2.3 (21.5–30.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 248 30.8 3.2 (24.5–37.1)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 1,585 28.7 1.4 (26.0–31.4)
Barre, Vermont 412 20.7 2.2 (16.3–25.1)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 545 28.2 2.1 (24.0–32.4)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 868 33.0 2.0 (29.0–37.0)
Billings, Montana 266 35.4 3.1 (29.2–41.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 468 21.9 2.2 (17.6–26.2)
Bismarck, North Dakota 289 14.9 2.2 (10.6–19.2)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 615 20.6 1.8 (17.1–24.1)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 1,151 23.5 1.6 (20.4–26.6)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 500 36.3 2.4 (31.6–41.0)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 1,301 29.2 1.7 (25.9–32.5)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,058 21.7 1.4 (19.0–24.4)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 1,106 25.9 1.7 (22.6–29.2)
Camden, New Jersey§ 956 18.9 1.6 (15.9–21.9)
Casper, Wyoming 311 18.0 2.4 (13.3–22.7)
Charleston, West Virginia 410 24.1 2.4 (19.3–28.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 558 27.7 2.2 (23.3–32.1)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,168 29.9 1.7 (26.6–33.2)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 391 19.6 2.3 (15.2–24.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 1,834 19.9 1.2 (17.6–22.2)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 490 18.8 3.5 (11.9–25.7)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 551 31.6 3.7 (24.4–38.8)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 359 23.2 2.4 (18.5–27.9)
Columbia, South Carolina 527 21.5 2.1 (17.3–25.7)
Concord, New Hampshire 353 35.9 2.9 (30.3–41.5)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 253 21.3 3.7 (14.0–28.6)
Dayton, Ohio 450 32.5 4.0 (24.7–40.3)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 1,358 34.0 1.4 (31.2–36.8)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 470 27.6 2.2 (23.2–32.0)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 451 22.5 2.3 (17.9–27.1)
Dover, Delaware 679 21.2 1.8 (17.6–24.8)
Durham, North Carolina 518 37.4 2.5 (32.5–42.3)
Edison, New Jersey§ 1,589 22.2 1.2 (19.9–24.5)
El Paso, Texas 238 15.8 3.1 (9.8–21.8)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 838 30.3 2.4 (25.6–35.0)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 313 38.6 3.0 (32.7–44.5)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 343 29.0 4.1 (21.0–37.0)
Farmington, New Mexico 242 17.5 3.1 (11.3–23.7)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 249 30.6 3.4 (23.9–37.3)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 406 28.8 3.0 (23.0–34.6)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 235 25.0 4.3 (16.6–33.4)
Great Falls, Montana 303 20.9 2.6 (15.8–26.0)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 513 43.5 2.8 (38.1–48.9)
Greenville, South Carolina 463 29.1 2.4 (24.4–33.8)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 342 26.6 3.1 (20.5–32.7)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 1,407 29.8 1.4 (27.0–32.6)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 368 29.3 3.0 (23.5–35.1)
Hilo, Hawaii 815 23.6 1.7 (20.4–26.8)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 455 22.9 2.2 (18.7–27.1)
Honolulu, Hawaii 1,502 30.0 1.3 (27.4–32.6)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 238 21.0 3.9 (13.3–28.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 282 26.0 3.4 (19.3–32.7)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 976 19.6 1.4 (16.8–22.4)
Jackson, Mississippi 533 25.0 2.1 (20.8–29.2)
Jacksonville, Florida 368 31.6 3.2 (25.4–37.8)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 777 24.8 1.8 (21.3–28.3)
Kalispell, Montana 297 23.0 2.8 (17.6–28.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1,700 25.0 1.4 (22.3–27.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 360 20.7 2.6 (15.6–25.8)
Keene, New Hampshire 281 25.6 2.7 (20.2–31.0)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 349 26.0 3.0 (20.1–31.9)

TABLE 26. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 271 15.1 2.6 (10.1–20.1)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 605 25.5 1.9 (21.7–29.3)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 897 32.4 1.7 (29.0–35.8)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 363 19.6 2.4 (14.9–24.3)
Lincoln, Nebraska 433 31.3 2.4 (26.6–36.0)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 654 22.3 1.8 (18.8–25.8)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 350 22.8 2.8 (17.4–28.2)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 463 22.1 2.2 (17.7–26.5)
Lubbock, Texas 297 20.2 2.8 (14.8–25.6)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 682 30.0 2.0 (26.1–33.9)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 414 23.8 2.8 (18.2–29.4)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 1,125 26.9 1.6 (23.7–30.1)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 644 17.8 2.1 (13.7–21.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,230 24.9 1.3 (22.3–27.5)
Missoula, Montana 273 28.3 3.0 (22.4–34.2)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 447 26.8 2.2 (22.4–31.2)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 318 16.2 2.3 (11.8–20.6)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 374 20.8 2.3 (16.3–25.3)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 1,791 22.6 1.5 (19.7–25.5)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,078 25.1 1.7 (21.8–28.4)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 745 24.3 1.9 (20.6–28.0)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 2,373 21.1 1.2 (18.7–23.5)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 325 18.7 2.4 (13.9–23.5)
Ocean City, New Jersey 358 20.4 2.4 (15.7–25.1)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 381 10.4 2.0 (6.4–14.4)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,113 18.4 1.3 (15.8–21.0)
Olympia, Washington 890 34.0 1.8 (30.5–37.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 843 30.2 1.8 (26.7–33.7)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 399 31.1 2.7 (25.9–36.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 1,303 21.5 1.9 (17.8–25.2)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 723 29.2 2.3 (24.8–33.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2,074 21.9 1.9 (18.2–25.6)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 648 30.2 2.0 (26.3–34.1)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 1,970 27.6 1.3 (25.1–30.1)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 3,506 26.8 1.0 (24.9–28.7)
Provo-Orem, Utah 219 8.9 2.2 (4.6–13.2)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 567 27.8 2.4 (23.1–32.5)
Rapid City, South Dakota 506 30.2 2.2 (25.9–34.5)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 665 18.9 1.7 (15.7–22.1)
Richmond, Virginia 432 21.0 2.3 (16.4–25.6)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 316 24.4 2.8 (18.9–29.9)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 808 29.2 1.8 (25.6–32.8)
Rutland, Vermont 412 24.2 2.3 (19.7–28.7)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 853 14.7 1.9 (11.0–18.4)
Salt Lake City, Utah 935 14.8 1.4 (12.1–17.5)
San Antonio, Texas 277 20.3 2.6 (15.3–25.3)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 275 28.0 3.0 (22.2–33.8)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 387 22.6 2.8 (17.1–28.1)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 334 16.4 2.2 (12.1–20.7)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 345 21.4 2.6 (16.4–26.4)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 1,522 20.5 2.7 (15.2–25.8)
Seaford, Delaware 798 30.1 1.8 (26.5–33.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 2,468 30.9 1.2 (28.5–33.3)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 319 25.8 2.8 (20.4–31.2)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 464 18.4 2.0 (14.5–22.3)
Spokane, Washington 689 32.6 2.0 (28.6–36.6)
Springfield, Massachusetts 840 30.8 2.4 (26.1–35.5)
Tacoma, Washington§ 849 32.7 1.8 (29.1–36.3)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 621 34.3 2.2 (30.0–38.6)
Toledo, Ohio 404 17.9 3.7 (10.6–25.2)
Topeka, Kansas 431 29.2 2.4 (24.5–33.9)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 276 22.7 2.7 (17.5–27.9)
Tucson, Arizona 473 28.2 2.4 (23.5–32.9)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,080 30.6 1.7 (27.4–33.8)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 573 22.2 2.3 (17.6–26.8)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 647 25.9 2.0 (22.1–29.7)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-
West Virginia§ 2,848 36.9 3.6 (29.9–43.9)
Wenatchee, Washington 647 34.8 2.2 (30.6–39.0)

TABLE 26. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 881 22.8 1.5 (19.8–25.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 894 18.7 1.6 (15.5–21.9)
Wilmington, North Carolina 433 28.3 2.4 (23.5–33.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 347 35.7 2.8 (30.3–41.1)
Worcester, Massachusetts 818 32.0 2.3 (27.5–36.5)
Yakima, Washington 420 34.1 2.6 (29.0–39.2)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 559 22.5 4.8 (13.1–31.9)
Yuma, Arizona 284 24.4 2.7 (19.1–29.7)
Median 25.0
Range 8.9–43.5
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 27

TABLE 27. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 288 26.3 3.0 (20.5–32.1)
Maricopa County, Arizona 459 29.1 2.4 (24.3–33.9)
Pima County, Arizona 473 28.2 2.4 (23.5–32.9)
Pinal County, Arizona 264 29.9 4.0 (22.1–37.7)
Yuma County, Arizona 284 24.4 2.7 (19.1–29.7)
Benton County, Arkansas 204 33.8 3.6 (26.7–40.9)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 376 22.8 2.4 (18.1–27.5)
Washington County, Arkansas 169 24.8 3.5 (17.9–31.7)
Alameda County, California 130 23.3 3.9 (15.6–31.0)
Los Angeles County, California 350 22.8 2.8 (17.4–28.2)
Riverside County, California 174 28.9 4.0 (21.0–36.8)
San Bernardino County, California 142 22.8 4.0 (14.9–30.7)
San Diego County, California 275 28.0 3.0 (22.2–33.8)
Adams County, Colorado 186 23.8 3.3 (17.4–30.2)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 309 36.0 3.1 (30.0–42.0)
Denver County, Colorado 311 34.6 3.0 (28.8–40.4)
Douglas County, Colorado 106 31.7 5.1 (21.7–41.7)
El Paso County, Colorado 339 23.9 2.5 (19.0–28.8)
Jefferson County, Colorado 371 36.4 2.7 (31.1–41.7)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 1,301 29.2 1.7 (25.9–32.5)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,016 29.3 1.7 (26.0–32.6)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 203 32.6 3.7 (25.3–39.9)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,078 25.1 1.7 (21.8–28.4)
New London County, Connecticut 325 18.7 2.4 (13.9–23.5)
Tolland County, Connecticut 188 28.4 3.7 (21.2–35.6)
Kent County, Delaware 679 21.2 1.8 (17.6–24.8)
New Castle County, Delaware 647 19.0 1.8 (15.5–22.5)
Sussex County, Delaware 798 30.1 1.8 (26.5–33.7)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 1,828 32.6 1.3 (30.0–35.2)
Broward County, Florida 365 24.7 2.7 (19.3–30.1)
Duval County, Florida 159 31.4 4.4 (22.7–40.1)
Hillsborough County, Florida 241 28.4 3.4 (21.7–35.1)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 444 23.4 2.4 (18.7–28.1)
Orange County, Florida 183 32.1 4.0 (24.3–39.9)
Palm Beach County, Florida 316 33.3 3.1 (27.2–39.4)
Pinellas County, Florida 211 37.3 3.8 (29.9–44.7)
Clayton County, Georgia 163 19.4 4.0 (11.6–27.2)
Cobb County, Georgia 191 27.5 3.5 (20.7–34.3)
DeKalb County, Georgia 229 33.1 3.8 (25.6–40.6)
Fulton County, Georgia 209 29.5 3.7 (22.3–36.7)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 154 36.3 4.4 (27.8–44.8)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 815 23.6 1.7 (20.4–26.8)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 1,502 30.0 1.3 (27.4–32.6)
Kauai County, Hawaii 360 20.7 2.6 (15.6–25.8)
Maui County, Hawaii 777 24.8 1.8 (21.3–28.3)
Ada County, Idaho 307 21.4 2.5 (16.4–26.4)
Canyon County, Idaho 234 21.1 2.8 (15.6–26.6)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 148 16.2 3.2 (9.9–22.5)
Cook County, Illinois 833 18.8 1.6 (15.6–22.0)
DuPage County, Illinois 173 14.9 3.0 (9.0–20.8)
Lake County, Illinois 128 17.9 3.8 (10.4–25.4)
Lake County, Indiana 276 10.1 2.0 (6.1–14.1)
Marion County, Indiana 624 22.3 2.0 (18.4–26.2)
Polk County, Iowa 358 26.1 2.5 (21.2–31.0)
Johnson County, Kansas 727 28.7 1.8 (25.1–32.3)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 663 22.0 1.7 (18.7–25.3)
Shawnee County, Kansas 309 30.0 2.8 (24.4–35.6)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 166 19.1 3.5 (12.2–26.0)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 247 19.9 2.9 (14.3–25.5)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 197 26.3 3.7 (19.1–33.5)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 324 24.9 2.6 (19.8–30.0)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 339 27.8 3.0 (22.0–33.6)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 149 27.6 4.2 (19.3–35.9)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 186 16.0 3.0 (10.1–21.9)
Cumberland County, Maine 343 30.2 2.8 (24.8–35.6)
York County, Maine 228 29.0 3.3 (22.6–35.4)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 287 27.5 2.9 (21.8–33.2)
Baltimore County, Maryland 503 30.1 2.3 (25.5–34.7)
Carroll County, Maryland 127 19.9 4.2 (11.7–28.1)

TABLE 27. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 142 18.4 3.5 (11.5–25.3)
Charles County, Maryland 125 19.2 3.8 (11.8–26.6)
Frederick County, Maryland 276 23.5 2.9 (17.7–29.3)
Harford County, Maryland 149 27.1 4.2 (19.0–35.2)
Howard County, Maryland 138 29.5 4.2 (21.2–37.8)
Montgomery County, Maryland 592 34.5 2.4 (29.7–39.3)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 315 28.0 3.1 (21.9–34.1)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 138 27.5 4.1 (19.5–35.5)
Washington County, Maryland 231 21.1 2.9 (15.4–26.8)
Baltimore city, Maryland 243 31.5 3.5 (24.7–38.3)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 1,118 28.4 2.4 (23.7–33.1)
Essex County, Massachusetts 838 31.3 2.5 (26.5–36.1)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 667 29.1 3.0 (23.2–35.0)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,106 26.3 1.7 (23.0–29.6)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 348 26.0 2.9 (20.4–31.6)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 254 20.2 2.8 (14.7–25.7)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 549 23.1 2.2 (18.7–27.5)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 818 32.0 2.3 (27.5–36.5)
Macomb County, Michigan 208 26.0 3.4 (19.4–32.6)
Oakland County, Michigan 316 28.6 3.1 (22.6–34.6)
Wayne County, Michigan 451 22.5 2.3 (17.9–27.1)
Dakota County, Minnesota 147 23.8 3.9 (16.2–31.4)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 467 23.8 2.1 (19.6–28.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 211 27.8 3.4 (21.2–34.4)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 128 29.3 5.0 (19.5–39.1)
Hinds County, Mississippi 235 24.8 3.3 (18.4–31.2)
Rankin County, Mississippi 138 24.4 3.8 (16.9–31.9)
Jackson County, Missouri 286 22.2 3.0 (16.4–28.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 172 16.0 3.8 (8.6–23.4)
St. Louis city, Missouri 322 NA§ NA —
Cascade County, Montana 303 20.9 2.6 (15.8–26.0)
Flathead County, Montana 297 23.0 2.8 (17.6–28.4)
Missoula County, Montana 273 28.3 3.0 (22.4–34.2)
Yellowstone County, Montana 237 33.2 3.3 (26.7–39.7)
Douglas County, Nebraska 462 31.1 2.4 (26.3–35.9)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 403 31.9 2.5 (27.0–36.8)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 121 29.6 4.5 (20.8–38.4)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 337 21.6 2.6 (16.5–26.7)
Clark County, Nevada 605 25.5 1.9 (21.7–29.3)
Washoe County, Nevada 657 19.0 1.7 (15.7–22.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 281 25.6 2.7 (20.2–31.0)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 254 39.1 3.3 (32.6–45.6)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 682 30.0 2.0 (26.1–33.9)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 353 35.9 2.9 (30.3–41.5)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 507 30.1 2.3 (25.6–34.6)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 301 26.6 2.9 (21.0–32.2)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 289 28.2 3.2 (21.9–34.5)
Bergen County, New Jersey 553 24.6 2.1 (20.4–28.8)
Burlington County, New Jersey 308 19.5 2.7 (14.2–24.8)
Camden County, New Jersey 364 17.7 2.3 (13.1–22.3)
Cape May County, New Jersey 358 20.4 2.4 (15.7–25.1)
Essex County, New Jersey 525 23.1 2.5 (18.3–27.9)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 284 19.7 2.9 (14.0–25.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 377 15.3 3.0 (9.4–21.2)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 280 25.0 2.9 (19.3–30.7)
Mercer County, New Jersey 276 22.7 2.7 (17.5–27.9)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 399 20.6 2.4 (16.0–25.2)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 411 22.3 2.4 (17.7–26.9)
Morris County, New Jersey 401 21.1 2.3 (16.6–25.6)
Ocean County, New Jersey 485 22.3 2.2 (18.0–26.6)
Passaic County, New Jersey 458 19.4 2.6 (14.3–24.5)
Somerset County, New Jersey 294 27.7 3.0 (21.8–33.6)
Sussex County, New Jersey 313 20.2 2.9 (14.6–25.8)
Union County, New Jersey 256 22.5 3.0 (16.6–28.4)
Warren County, New Jersey 293 18.3 2.6 (13.1–23.5)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 603 23.9 1.9 (20.1–27.7)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 271 15.1 2.6 (10.1–20.1)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 190 26.2 3.9 (18.6–33.8)
San Juan County, New Mexico 242 17.5 3.1 (11.4–23.6)

TABLE 27. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 334 16.4 2.2 (12.1–20.7)
Kings County, New York 207 18.2 3.0 (12.3–24.1)
Nassau County, New York 188 23.8 3.4 (17.1–30.5)
New York County, New York 238 19.2 3.0 (13.4–25.0)
Queens County, New York 195 24.5 3.8 (17.1–31.9)
Suffolk County, New York 186 17.8 3.0 (11.8–23.8)
Westchester County, New York 145 19.8 3.6 (12.8–26.8)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 210 37.9 3.7 (30.6–45.2)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 212 25.7 3.2 (19.5–31.9)
Catawba County, North Carolina 230 25.4 3.1 (19.3–31.5)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 205 32.1 3.7 (24.8–39.4)
Durham County, North Carolina 184 35.2 3.8 (27.7–42.7)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 237 36.8 3.4 (30.1–43.5)
Gaston County, North Carolina 222 30.3 3.7 (23.1–37.5)
Guilford County, North Carolina 233 46.6 3.9 (39.0–54.2)
Johnston County, North Carolina 217 22.1 3.1 (16.1–28.1)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 374 31.5 2.9 (25.9–37.1)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 243 27.5 3.2 (21.2–33.8)
Orange County, North Carolina 185 37.3 4.2 (29.2–45.4)
Randolph County, North Carolina 216 36.9 3.7 (29.7–44.1)
Union County, North Carolina 199 28.0 3.7 (20.8–35.2)
Wake County, North Carolina 294 29.2 3.0 (23.2–35.2)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 203 11.4 2.3 (6.8–16.0)
Cass County, North Dakota 316 35.7 3.1 (29.7–41.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 234 NA NA —
Hamilton County, Ohio 209 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 274 19.9 2.9 (14.3–25.5)
Lucas County, Ohio 375 16.2 2.4 (11.6–20.8)
Mahoning County, Ohio 506 16.8 2.1 (12.8–20.8)
Montgomery County, Ohio 419 32.1 2.9 (26.4–37.8)
Summit County, Ohio 373 24.1 3.0 (18.3–29.9)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 182 18.8 3.2 (12.5–25.1)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 660 18.1 1.7 (14.8–21.4)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 773 32.8 1.9 (29.0–36.6)
Clackamas County, Oregon 246 23.8 2.9 (18.1–29.5)
Lane County, Oregon 313 38.6 3.0 (32.7–44.5)
Multnomah County, Oregon 384 23.4 2.3 (18.8–28.0)
Washington County, Oregon 237 29.7 3.3 (23.2–36.2)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 291 24.4 2.9 (18.7–30.1)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 1,390 21.7 1.4 (18.9–24.5)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 1,439 21.0 2.5 (16.1–25.9)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 169 18.2 3.2 (11.9–24.5)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 836 17.3 3.1 (11.2–23.4)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 173 24.2 4.8 (14.7–33.7)
Kent County, Rhode Island 358 24.1 2.5 (19.3–28.9)
Newport County, Rhode Island 212 29.4 3.4 (22.7–36.1)
Providence County, Rhode Island 1,435 27.6 1.3 (25.0–30.2)
Washington County, Rhode Island 279 22.4 2.7 (17.2–27.6)
Aiken County, South Carolina 307 26.1 2.7 (20.8–31.4)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 418 23.7 2.3 (19.3–28.1)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 133 28.2 4.3 (19.8–36.6)
Charleston County, South Carolina 320 27.0 2.9 (21.3–32.7)
Greenville County, South Carolina 281 28.6 3.0 (22.6–34.6)
Horry County, South Carolina 447 26.8 2.2 (22.4–31.2)
Lexington County, South Carolina 165 21.8 3.6 (14.8–28.8)
Richland County, South Carolina 217 21.4 3.1 (15.3–27.5)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 342 17.1 2.3 (12.6–21.6)
Pennington County, South Dakota 390 33.7 2.6 (28.7–38.7)
Davidson County, Tennessee 151 16.8 3.1 (10.7–22.9)
Shelby County, Tennessee 143 25.2 4.1 (17.1–33.3)
Bexar County, Texas 202 19.8 3.0 (13.9–25.7)
Dallas County, Texas 189 24.9 4.8 (15.4–34.4)
El Paso County, Texas 238 15.8 3.1 (9.8–21.8)
Harris County, Texas 164 18.7 4.7 (9.4–28.0)
Lubbock County, Texas 286 19.7 2.8 (14.2–25.2)
Tarrant County, Texas 208 22.9 4.5 (14.0–31.8)
Travis County, Texas 141 30.4 4.2 (22.1–38.7)
Davis County, Utah 172 14.1 3.4 (7.5–20.7)
Salt Lake County, Utah 724 14.7 1.4 (11.9–17.5)

TABLE 27. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 98 16.8 4.3 (8.4–25.2)
Tooele County, Utah 113 16.8 4.3 (8.4–25.2)
Utah County, Utah 205 8.5 2.2 (4.2–12.8)
Weber County, Utah 201 6.1 1.8 (2.6–9.6)
Chittenden County, Vermont 763 20.2 1.6 (17.1–23.3)
Franklin County, Vermont 235 30.2 3.3 (23.7–36.7)
Orange County, Vermont 216 29.6 3.4 (23.0–36.2)
Rutland County, Vermont 412 24.2 2.3 (19.7–28.7)
Washington County, Vermont 412 20.7 2.2 (16.3–25.1)
Windsor County, Vermont 427 27.3 2.3 (22.8–31.8)
Asotin County, Washington 215 25.3 3.5 (18.4–32.2)
Benton County, Washington 199 27.2 3.5 (20.3–34.1)
Chelan County, Washington 350 33.9 2.8 (28.4–39.4)
Clark County, Washington 819 34.7 1.9 (31.0–38.4)
Douglas County, Washington 297 36.2 3.1 (30.1–42.3)
Franklin County, Washington 150 19.8 3.4 (13.1–26.5)
King County, Washington 1,667 31.4 1.3 (28.9–33.9)
Kitsap County, Washington 500 36.3 2.4 (31.6–41.0)
Pierce County, Washington 849 32.6 1.8 (29.1–36.1)
Snohomish County, Washington 801 29.4 1.8 (25.8–33.0)
Spokane County, Washington 689 32.6 2.0 (28.6–36.6)
Thurston County, Washington 890 34.0 1.8 (30.5–37.5)
Yakima County, Washington 420 34.1 2.6 (29.0–39.2)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 265 24.6 3.0 (18.7–30.5)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 444 20.8 3.0 (14.9–26.7)
Laramie County, Wyoming 391 19.6 2.3 (15.2–24.0)
Natrona County, Wyoming 311 18.0 2.4 (13.3–22.7)
Median 24.9
Range 6.1–46.6
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 28

TABLE 28. Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding 3 years, by
state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 1,210 83.4 1.5 (80.4–86.4)
Alaska 896 87.0 1.8 (83.5–90.5)
Arizona 1,955 84.1 1.6 (80.9–87.3)
Arkansas 2,122 80.5 1.1 (78.3–82.7)
California 2,456 84.0 1.1 (81.9–86.1)
Colorado 2,533 85.3 0.9 (83.6–87.0)
Connecticut 3,903 86.8 0.8 (85.3–88.3)
Delaware 1,863 89.0 1.0 (87.1–90.9)
District of Columbia 1,866 89.4 1.0 (87.5–91.3)
Florida 4,348 82.8 0.9 (81.1–84.5)
Georgia 3,137 87.4 0.9 (85.7–89.1)
Hawaii 2,918 82.0 1.1 (79.9–84.1)
Idaho 2,127 77.6 1.2 (75.2–80.0)
Illinois 2,408 83.6 1.1 (81.5–85.7)
Indiana 2,750 81.0 1.0 (79.0–83.0)
Iowa 2,329 86.1 0.9 (84.4–87.8)
Kansas 3,340 83.6 0.9 (81.9–85.3)
Kentucky 2,257 83.1 1.2 (80.7–85.5)
Louisiana 2,797 84.5 0.9 (82.7–86.3)
Maine 1,795 89.1 0.8 (87.4–90.8)
Maryland 3,970 87.8 0.8 (86.2–89.4)
Massachusetts 6,039 87.7 0.7 (86.3–89.1)
Michigan 2,592 85.8 0.9 (84.0–87.6)
Minnesota 1,983 86.2 1.1 (84.0–88.4)
Mississippi 2,372 84.0 0.9 (82.2–85.8)
Missouri 2,230 79.9 1.5 (76.9–82.9)
Montana 2,385 82.1 1.1 (79.9–84.3)
Nebraska 3,302 81.6 1.1 (79.5–83.7)
Nevada 1,329 82.1 1.5 (79.1–85.1)
New Hampshire 2,739 88.0 0.9 (86.2–89.8)
New Jersey 6,191 84.0 0.7 (82.6–85.4)
New Mexico 2,818 83.1 1.0 (81.2–85.0)
New York 2,801 85.1 0.9 (83.3–86.9)
North Carolina 6,652 86.8 0.7 (85.5–88.1)
North Dakota 1,988 84.5 1.1 (82.3–86.7)
Ohio 2,486 83.4 1.7 (80.1–86.7)
Oklahoma 2,710 79.4 1.0 (77.5–81.3)
Oregon 2,006 83.4 1.1 (81.3–85.5)
Pennsylvania 5,971 82.8 0.9 (81.0–84.6)
Rhode Island 2,144 87.8 1.1 (85.7–89.9)
South Carolina 3,446 86.8 0.8 (85.3–88.3)
South Dakota 2,895 85.1 0.9 (83.3–86.9)
Tennessee 1,802 85.9 1.2 (83.5–88.3)
Texas 2,755 80.2 1.7 (76.9–83.5)
Utah 2,061 74.3 1.7 (70.9–77.7)
Vermont 3,228 87.1 0.8 (85.5–88.7)
Virginia 2,298 85.6 1.2 (83.2–88.0)
Washington 10,158 84.0 0.6 (82.9–85.1)
West Virginia 1,533 83.8 1.1 (81.6–86.0)
Wisconsin 2,071 86.0 1.1 (83.7–88.3)
Wyoming 1,886 80.9 1.1 (78.6–83.2)
Puerto Rico 2,242 72.3 1.3 (69.8–74.8)
U.S.Virgin Islands 1,555 81.4 1.3 (78.9–83.9)
Median 84.0
Range 72.3–89.4
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 29

TABLE 29. Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding 3 years, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 308 83.8 4.3 (75.3–92.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 799 85.4 1.7 (82.1–88.7)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 391 82.3 3.7 (75.1–89.5)
Asheville, North Carolina 219 86.3 2.9 (80.6–92.0)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 1,397 90.5 1.1 (88.3–92.7)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 227 84.1 2.8 (78.7–89.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 341 87.2 2.5 (82.3–92.1)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 214 85.7 2.9 (80.0–91.4)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 1,418 87.8 1.3 (85.3–90.3)
Barre, Vermont 350 93.2 1.3 (90.6–95.8)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 490 92.0 1.5 (89.1–94.9)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 837 86.1 1.7 (82.8–89.4)
Billings, Montana 218 81.3 3.2 (74.9–87.7)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 333 92.9 1.6 (89.7–96.1)
Bismarck, North Dakota 259 87.4 2.6 (82.3–92.5)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 549 81.6 2.0 (77.7–85.5)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 1,143 87.6 1.5 (84.6–90.6)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 389 85.7 2.2 (81.3–90.1)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 1,163 87.8 1.6 (84.7–90.9)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 986 88.6 1.4 (85.9–91.3)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 1,077 88.9 1.4 (86.1–91.7)
Camden, New Jersey§ 811 86.6 1.6 (83.6–89.6)
Casper, Wyoming 220 83.4 2.9 (77.7–89.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 267 85.9 2.3 (81.4–90.4)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 434 88.3 2.0 (84.4–92.2)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,018 88.2 1.4 (85.4–91.0)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 264 87.9 2.5 (83.1–92.7)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 1,786 84.1 1.3 (81.6–86.6)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 429 82.8 4.1 (74.7–90.9)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 468 86.0 4.5 (77.3–94.7)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 352 86.6 2.4 (81.9–91.3)
Columbia, South Carolina 420 90.7 1.6 (87.5–93.9)
Concord, New Hampshire 283 91.6 1.9 (87.9–95.3)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 223 93.9 1.5 (90.9–96.9)
Dayton, Ohio 323 89.0 2.6 (84.0–94.0)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 1,189 87.1 1.3 (84.6–89.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 428 91.8 1.6 (88.6–95.0)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 389 87.5 2.1 (83.4–91.6)
Dover, Delaware 664 89.5 1.5 (86.6–92.4)
Durham, North Carolina 452 92.0 1.6 (88.8–95.2)
Edison, New Jersey§ 1,368 84.1 1.3 (81.5–86.7)
El Paso, Texas 252 80.0 3.0 (74.1–85.9)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 890 90.4 1.6 (87.4–93.4)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 191 85.9 3.1 (79.8–92.0)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 326 91.4 1.9 (87.6–95.2)
Farmington, New Mexico 238 74.7 3.9 (67.1–82.3)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 276 91.1 1.7 (87.7–94.5)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 295 NAķ NA —
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 194 83.1 3.8 (75.7–90.5)
Great Falls, Montana 203 86.9 3.4 (80.2–93.6)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 379 89.6 1.8 (86.0–93.2)
Greenville, South Carolina 312 86.3 2.7 (80.9–91.7)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 272 90.0 2.3 (85.4–94.6)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 1,210 85.3 1.5 (82.3–88.3)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 264 87.4 2.4 (82.7–92.1)
Hilo, Hawaii 609 80.5 2.5 (75.6–85.4)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 286 84.9 2.7 (79.7–90.1)
Honolulu, Hawaii 1,314 82.3 1.4 (79.6–85.0)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 248 77.7 4.6 (68.7–86.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 202 86.2 3.1 (80.2–92.2)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 901 83.6 1.6 (80.4–86.8)
Jackson, Mississippi 409 88.1 2.0 (84.2–92.0)
Jacksonville, Florida 287 85.3 4.3 (76.9–93.7)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 704 82.7 2.0 (78.7–86.7)
Kalispell, Montana 214 82.6 3.1 (76.5–88.7)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1,447 84.8 1.4 (82.1–87.5)
Kapaa, Hawaii 291 84.6 2.5 (79.7–89.5)
Keene, New Hampshire 217 81.9 3.4 (75.2–88.6)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 289 79.3 3.6 (72.3–86.3)

TABLE 29. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding
3 years, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 251 85.3 2.6 (80.2–90.4)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 471 82.9 2.0 (79.0–86.8)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 698 88.2 1.5 (85.3–91.1)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 219 81.3 3.3 (74.8–87.8)
Lincoln, Nebraska 307 82.1 3.2 (75.8–88.4)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 495 84.9 2.2 (80.5–89.3)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 341 83.7 2.5 (78.9–88.5)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 366 84.5 2.5 (79.6–89.4)
Lubbock, Texas 217 85.3 2.5 (80.3–90.3)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 686 89.5 1.3 (86.9–92.1)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 392 90.4 1.8 (86.8–94.0)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 1,004 81.0 1.7 (77.7–84.3)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 628 86.3 2.4 (81.7–90.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,174 85.9 1.5 (83.0–88.8)
Missoula, Montana 208 82.5 3.6 (75.4–89.6)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 271 87.9 2.2 (83.7–92.1)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 266 86.0 2.9 (80.4–91.6)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 322 84.2 2.5 (79.3–89.1)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 1,588 85.3 1.4 (82.5–88.1)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 945 85.5 1.6 (82.3–88.7)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 601 81.5 2.3 (77.0–86.0)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 2,290 84.9 1.3 (82.4–87.4)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 281 93.3 1.3 (90.8–95.8)
Ocean City, New Jersey 241 83.1 2.7 (77.8–88.4)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 300 80.9 3.3 (74.5–87.3)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 894 83.2 1.5 (80.3–86.1)
Olympia, Washington 742 83.6 1.9 (79.9–87.3)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 766 84.2 1.7 (80.9–87.5)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 349 86.8 2.1 (82.6–91.0)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 1,375 84.4 1.7 (81.0–87.8)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 539 85.1 2.3 (80.6–89.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,572 80.4 2.2 (76.1–84.7)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 621 89.4 1.4 (86.7–92.1)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 1,658 85.3 1.4 (82.5–88.1)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 3,204 88.1 0.8 (86.4–89.8)
Provo-Orem, Utah 256 NA NA —
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 578 85.7 2.5 (80.9–90.5)
Rapid City, South Dakota 423 89.6 1.6 (86.5–92.7)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 473 83.5 2.2 (79.2–87.8)
Richmond, Virginia 384 90.9 1.6 (87.7–94.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 278 86.7 2.4 (82.1–91.3)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 784 86.1 2.4 (81.4–90.8)
Rutland, Vermont 306 88.2 2.0 (84.2–92.2)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 713 81.7 2.6 (76.6–86.8)
Salt Lake City, Utah 885 78.5 2.2 (74.2–82.8)
San Antonio, Texas 227 85.2 2.8 (79.6–90.8)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 234 86.9 2.5 (82.0–91.8)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 349 89.7 2.2 (85.4–94.0)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 235 87.6 2.5 (82.6–92.6)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 240 82.0 2.7 (76.7–87.3)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 1,300 81.5 2.1 (77.3–85.7)
Seaford, Delaware 551 88.6 1.5 (85.6–91.6)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 2,227 84.9 1.1 (82.8–87.0)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 266 89.6 2.0 (85.6–93.6)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 410 92.4 1.3 (89.9–94.9)
Spokane, Washington 533 84.9 2.1 (80.7–89.1)
Springfield, Massachusetts 746 90.0 1.6 (86.9–93.1)
Tacoma, Washington§ 691 86.6 1.7 (83.3–89.9)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 441 84.2 2.3 (79.7–88.7)
Toledo, Ohio 346 82.7 3.9 (75.1–90.3)
Topeka, Kansas 303 78.8 3.4 (72.1–85.5)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 222 85.5 2.6 (80.3–90.7)
Tucson, Arizona 326 83.7 2.5 (78.7–88.7)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 712 80.8 1.8 (77.2–84.4)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 482 87.9 2.2 (83.5–92.3)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 600 84.7 1.9 (81.0–88.4)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia§ 2,863 86.1 2.2 (81.8–90.4)
Wenatchee, Washington 390 85.8 2.1 (81.6–90.0)

TABLE 29. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding
3 years, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 655 87.0 1.5 (84.1–89.9)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 858 88.0 1.3 (85.4–90.6)
Wilmington, North Carolina 312 93.6 1.5 (90.6–96.6)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 248 91.0 2.1 (86.9–95.1)
Worcester, Massachusetts 837 84.0 2.4 (79.4–88.6)
Yakima, Washington 308 87.3 2.3 (82.7–91.9)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 391 NA NA —
Yuma, Arizona 203 76.6 4.0 (68.7–84.5)
Median 85.9
Range 74.7–93.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 30

TABLE 30. Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding 3 years, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 197 93.8 1.9 (90.1–97.5)
Maricopa County, Arizona 370 85.2 2.4 (80.4–90.0)
Pima County, Arizona 326 83.7 2.5 (78.7–88.7)
Pinal County, Arizona 169 85.2 3.8 (77.7–92.7)
Yuma County, Arizona 203 76.6 4.0 (68.7–84.5)
Benton County, Arkansas 129 86.6 3.4 (79.9–93.3)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 279 88.0 2.3 (83.5–92.5)
Washington County, Arkansas 144 78.8 4.3 (70.4–87.2)
Alameda County, California 117 90.0 2.9 (84.3–95.7)
Los Angeles County, California 341 83.7 2.5 (78.9–88.5)
Riverside County, California 136 86.7 3.4 (80.0–93.4)
San Bernardino County, California 142 87.6 3.1 (81.6–93.6)
San Diego County, California 234 86.9 2.5 (82.0–91.8)
Adams County, Colorado 174 81.7 3.4 (75.1–88.3)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 273 88.3 2.2 (84.0–92.6)
Denver County, Colorado 244 89.5 2.1 (85.4–93.6)
Douglas County, Colorado 146 93.3 2.5 (88.5–98.1)
El Paso County, Colorado 340 87.0 2.5 (82.1–91.9)
Jefferson County, Colorado 292 87.8 2.6 (82.8–92.8)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 1,163 87.8 1.6 (84.7–90.9)
Hartford County, Connecticut 893 84.1 1.7 (80.7–87.5)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 172 90.3 2.4 (85.6–95.0)
New Haven County, Connecticut 945 85.5 1.6 (82.3–88.7)
New London County, Connecticut 281 93.3 1.3 (90.8–95.8)
Tolland County, Connecticut 145 91.9 2.6 (86.7–97.1)
Kent County, Delaware 664 89.5 1.5 (86.6–92.4)
New Castle County, Delaware 648 89.3 1.4 (86.6–92.0)
Sussex County, Delaware 551 88.6 1.5 (85.6–91.6)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 1,866 89.5 1.0 (87.6–91.4)
Broward County, Florida 328 85.7 2.3 (81.3–90.1)
Duval County, Florida 113 84.6 4.4 (75.9–93.3)
Hillsborough County, Florida 190 83.0 3.9 (75.3–90.7)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 479 80.7 2.2 (76.3–85.1)
Orange County, Florida 192 87.1 3.0 (81.1–93.1)
Palm Beach County, Florida 197 82.0 3.3 (75.5–88.5)
Pinellas County, Florida 150 90.1 2.4 (85.4–94.8)
Clayton County, Georgia 175 85.8 3.0 (79.9–91.7)
Cobb County, Georgia 164 91.9 2.4 (87.1–96.7)
DeKalb County, Georgia 211 89.8 3.2 (83.5–96.1)
Fulton County, Georgia 192 92.5 2.4 (87.8–97.2)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 183 92.9 2.3 (88.3–97.5)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 609 80.5 2.5 (75.6–85.4)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 1,314 82.3 1.4 (79.6–85.0)
Kauai County, Hawaii 291 84.6 2.5 (79.7–89.5)
Maui County, Hawaii 704 82.7 2.0 (78.7–86.7)
Ada County, Idaho 290 82.8 2.6 (77.8–87.8)
Canyon County, Idaho 204 78.7 3.4 (72.1–85.3)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 81 81.5 4.9 (71.9–91.1)
Cook County, Illinois 818 84.8 1.8 (81.4–88.2)
DuPage County, Illinois 193 86.5 2.6 (81.4–91.6)
Lake County, Illinois 136 80.9 4.7 (71.8–90.0)
Lake County, Indiana 222 80.4 3.5 (73.4–87.4)
Marion County, Indiana 601 82.2 1.9 (78.4–86.0)
Polk County, Iowa 329 92.3 1.6 (89.1–95.5)
Johnson County, Kansas 689 88.1 1.9 (84.4–91.8)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 483 88.2 1.7 (85.0–91.4)
Shawnee County, Kansas 219 77.7 4.3 (69.2–86.2)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 139 84.1 3.5 (77.2–91.0)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 191 83.7 3.4 (77.1–90.3)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 178 88.1 2.7 (82.8–93.4)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 269 92.8 1.8 (89.3–96.3)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 283 83.8 2.7 (78.4–89.2)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 105 NA§ NA —
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 148 81.3 4.0 (73.5–89.1)
Cumberland County, Maine 333 90.3 1.8 (86.7–93.9)
York County, Maine 225 89.2 2.3 (84.8–93.6)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 249 91.0 2.0 (87.1–94.9)
Baltimore County, Maryland 415 88.9 2.0 (85.0–92.8)
Carroll County, Maryland 117 88.1 3.9 (80.4–95.8)

TABLE 30. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding
3 years, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 133 85.4 3.9 (77.8–93.0)
Charles County, Maryland 129 92.5 2.5 (87.6–97.4)
Frederick County, Maryland 286 86.6 2.5 (81.6–91.6)
Harford County, Maryland 119 88.3 4.2 (80.0–96.6)
Howard County, Maryland 152 91.3 3.1 (85.3–97.3)
Montgomery County, Maryland 551 86.8 1.8 (83.2–90.4)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 283 91.1 1.9 (87.4–94.8)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 127 81.9 4.4 (73.3–90.5)
Washington County, Maryland 188 87.7 2.7 (82.4–93.0)
Baltimore city, Maryland 239 86.0 2.7 (80.7–91.3)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 1,060 87.6 1.6 (84.5–90.7)
Essex County, Massachusetts 890 88.8 2.0 (85.0–92.6)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 598 88.5 2.0 (84.6–92.4)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,077 88.8 1.5 (85.8–91.8)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 292 91.0 2.2 (86.8–95.2)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 250 86.3 2.6 (81.2–91.4)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 601 87.4 2.4 (82.8–92.0)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 837 84.0 2.4 (79.4–88.6)
Macomb County, Michigan 182 78.1 3.7 (70.8–85.4)
Oakland County, Michigan 301 87.5 2.6 (82.5–92.5)
Wayne County, Michigan 389 87.5 2.1 (83.4–91.6)
Dakota County, Minnesota 144 89.5 3.1 (83.3–95.7)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 431 85.6 2.3 (81.2–90.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 210 81.1 3.5 (74.3–87.9)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 130 87.3 3.2 (80.9–93.7)
Hinds County, Mississippi 182 88.3 3.1 (82.3–94.3)
Rankin County, Mississippi 94 87.8 3.9 (80.1–95.5)
Jackson County, Missouri 221 82.2 2.9 (76.5–87.9)
St. Louis County, Missouri 161 84.0 4.5 (75.2–92.8)
St. Louis city, Missouri 268 87.3 2.4 (82.7–91.9)
Cascade County, Montana 203 86.9 3.4 (80.2–93.6)
Flathead County, Montana 214 82.6 3.1 (76.5–88.7)
Missoula County, Montana 208 82.5 3.6 (75.4–89.6)
Yellowstone County, Montana 199 80.3 3.5 (73.5–87.1)
Douglas County, Nebraska 458 85.6 2.1 (81.6–89.6)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 283 82.2 3.5 (75.4–89.0)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 135 81.1 3.9 (73.5–88.7)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 234 81.3 2.8 (75.8–86.8)
Clark County, Nevada 471 82.9 2.0 (79.0–86.8)
Washoe County, Nevada 466 83.3 2.2 (78.9–87.7)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 217 81.9 3.4 (75.2–88.6)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 209 89.6 2.4 (84.9–94.3)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 686 89.5 1.3 (86.9–92.1)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 283 91.6 1.9 (87.9–95.3)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 484 89.0 1.8 (85.5–92.5)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 300 88.9 2.1 (84.7–93.1)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 227 84.1 2.8 (78.7–89.5)
Bergen County, New Jersey 424 84.2 2.2 (79.8–88.6)
Burlington County, New Jersey 231 90.3 2.2 (86.1–94.5)
Camden County, New Jersey 308 83.3 3.0 (77.5–89.1)
Cape May County, New Jersey 241 83.1 2.7 (77.8–88.4)
Essex County, New Jersey 505 84.8 2.3 (80.2–89.4)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 272 86.7 2.2 (82.3–91.1)
Hudson County, New Jersey 417 82.7 2.4 (78.0–87.4)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 260 89.4 2.0 (85.4–93.4)
Mercer County, New Jersey 222 85.5 2.6 (80.3–90.7)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 380 82.2 2.4 (77.4–87.0)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 352 87.7 2.3 (83.2–92.2)
Morris County, New Jersey 325 90.1 2.0 (86.2–94.0)
Ocean County, New Jersey 349 81.3 2.4 (76.6–86.0)
Passaic County, New Jersey 424 84.1 2.5 (79.1–89.1)
Somerset County, New Jersey 287 89.6 2.6 (84.4–94.8)
Sussex County, New Jersey 257 86.4 2.4 (81.8–91.0)
Union County, New Jersey 229 86.8 2.5 (81.9–91.7)
Warren County, New Jersey 250 82.0 3.2 (75.8–88.2)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 521 86.4 1.9 (82.6–90.2)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 251 85.3 2.6 (80.2–90.4)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 164 84.9 3.1 (78.9–90.9)
San Juan County, New Mexico 238 74.7 3.9 (67.1–82.3)

TABLE 30. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding
3 years, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 235 87.6 2.5 (82.6–92.6)
Kings County, New York 243 89.3 2.2 (84.9–93.7)
Nassau County, New York 162 81.5 3.6 (74.5–88.5)
New York County, New York 236 80.9 3.6 (73.9–87.9)
Queens County, New York 197 84.8 3.0 (78.8–90.8)
Suffolk County, New York 160 87.4 3.5 (80.6–94.2)
Westchester County, New York 125 88.0 3.9 (80.3–95.7)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 160 89.3 2.6 (84.1–94.5)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 169 89.1 3.0 (83.3–94.9)
Catawba County, North Carolina 170 86.4 3.1 (80.3–92.5)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 220 90.7 2.0 (86.8–94.6)
Durham County, North Carolina 182 93.2 2.1 (89.1–97.3)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 177 93.2 2.4 (88.4–98.0)
Gaston County, North Carolina 154 88.8 3.0 (82.9–94.7)
Guilford County, North Carolina 183 89.5 2.5 (84.7–94.3)
Johnston County, North Carolina 199 87.0 3.2 (80.7–93.3)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 401 88.3 2.2 (84.1–92.5)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 191 92.7 2.4 (88.0–97.4)
Orange County, North Carolina 163 94.3 1.9 (90.5–98.1)
Randolph County, North Carolina 156 89.0 2.6 (84.0–94.0)
Union County, North Carolina 182 91.5 2.2 (87.2–95.8)
Wake County, North Carolina 334 85.4 3.2 (79.1–91.7)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 178 91.9 2.4 (87.2–96.6)
Cass County, North Dakota 303 87.8 2.4 (83.1–92.5)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 207 NA NA —
Hamilton County, Ohio 174 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 216 91.2 1.9 (87.5–94.9)
Lucas County, Ohio 322 81.1 3.4 (74.5–87.7)
Mahoning County, Ohio 355 86.8 2.0 (82.8–90.8)
Montgomery County, Ohio 310 88.2 2.3 (83.6–92.8)
Summit County, Ohio 291 85.6 3.3 (79.2–92.0)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 149 78.8 3.8 (71.4–86.2)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 531 84.4 1.9 (80.7–88.1)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 525 80.2 2.2 (75.8–84.6)
Clackamas County, Oregon 193 88.2 2.8 (82.8–93.6)
Lane County, Oregon 191 85.9 3.1 (79.8–92.0)
Multnomah County, Oregon 335 83.0 2.6 (77.9–88.1)
Washington County, Oregon 228 89.1 2.8 (83.6–94.6)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 224 81.4 2.9 (75.6–87.2)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 1,083 79.2 2.8 (73.7–84.7)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 1,232 76.5 2.0 (72.6–80.4)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 157 86.1 3.6 (79.1–93.1)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 941 81.0 3.0 (75.1–86.9)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 109 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 289 87.9 2.2 (83.6–92.2)
Newport County, Rhode Island 174 85.6 4.0 (77.7–93.5)
Providence County, Rhode Island 1,344 87.6 1.4 (84.9–90.3)
Washington County, Rhode Island 239 91.8 2.4 (87.2–96.4)
Aiken County, South Carolina 185 86.9 3.2 (80.6–93.2)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 262 85.7 2.7 (80.5–90.9)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 107 87.0 3.6 (80.0–94.0)
Charleston County, South Carolina 241 91.0 1.9 (87.3–94.7)
Greenville County, South Carolina 201 88.0 2.9 (82.3–93.7)
Horry County, South Carolina 271 87.9 2.2 (83.7–92.1)
Lexington County, South Carolina 124 88.8 3.3 (82.3–95.3)
Richland County, South Carolina 194 91.3 2.2 (87.0–95.6)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 311 91.6 1.6 (88.4–94.8)
Pennington County, South Dakota 341 89.9 1.7 (86.5–93.3)
Davidson County, Tennessee 123 84.3 4.7 (75.0–93.6)
Shelby County, Tennessee 138 91.5 2.6 (86.4–96.6)
Bexar County, Texas 178 86.0 3.0 (80.1–91.9)
Dallas County, Texas 158 91.4 2.4 (86.6–96.2)
El Paso County, Texas 252 80.0 3.0 (74.1–85.9)
Harris County, Texas 190 NA NA —
Lubbock County, Texas 212 85.3 2.6 (80.3–90.3)
Tarrant County, Texas 170 84.7 3.9 (77.1–92.3)
Travis County, Texas 122 89.3 3.4 (82.7–95.9)
Davis County, Utah 153 83.7 3.5 (76.8–90.6)
Salt Lake County, Utah 677 78.1 2.3 (73.5–82.7)

TABLE 30. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >18 years who had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding 3
years, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 118 95.4 1.8 (91.9–98.9)
Tooele County, Utah 90 NA NA —
Utah County, Utah 244 NA NA —
Weber County, Utah 139 85.6 3.3 (79.1–92.1)
Chittenden County, Vermont 739 89.4 1.5 (86.4–92.4)
Franklin County, Vermont 202 86.2 2.7 (80.9–91.5)
Orange County, Vermont 175 86.5 2.9 (80.8–92.2)
Rutland County, Vermont 306 88.2 2.0 (84.2–92.2)
Washington County, Vermont 350 93.2 1.3 (90.6–95.8)
Windsor County, Vermont 314 86.8 2.0 (82.9–90.7)
Asotin County, Washington 138 82.3 3.6 (75.3–89.3)
Benton County, Washington 151 77.2 4.5 (68.5–85.9)
Chelan County, Washington 193 88.0 2.5 (83.0–93.0)
Clark County, Washington 679 85.0 2.0 (81.0–89.0)
Douglas County, Washington 197 82.6 3.6 (75.6–89.6)
Franklin County, Washington 138 86.1 4.2 (77.9–94.3)
King County, Washington 1,512 84.8 1.2 (82.4–87.2)
Kitsap County, Washington 389 85.7 2.2 (81.3–90.1)
Pierce County, Washington 691 86.6 1.6 (83.4–89.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 715 85.2 1.7 (81.8–88.6)
Spokane County, Washington 533 84.9 2.1 (80.7–89.1)
Thurston County, Washington 742 83.6 1.9 (79.9–87.3)
Yakima County, Washington 308 87.3 2.3 (82.7–91.9)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 184 86.9 2.8 (81.4–92.4)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 445 86.1 3.1 (80.0–92.2)
Laramie County, Wyoming 264 87.9 2.5 (83.1–92.7)
Natrona County, Wyoming 220 83.4 2.9 (77.7–89.1)
Median 86.7
Range 74.7–95.4
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
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Table 31

TABLE 31. Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by state/
territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 1,626 77.2 1.2 (74.8–79.6)
Alaska 722 73.4 2.1 (69.2–77.6)
Arizona 2,178 77.4 1.6 (74.3–80.5)
Arkansas 2,667 70.0 1.0 (68.0–72.0)
California 2,322 78.5 1.1 (76.3–80.7)
Colorado 2,437 72.0 1.0 (70.0–74.0)
Connecticut 3,784 82.0 0.8 (80.5–83.5)
Delaware 1,814 83.7 1.1 (81.5–85.9)
District of Columbia 1,555 81.8 1.2 (79.5–84.1)
Florida 5,033 78.0 0.8 (76.4–79.6)
Georgia 3,420 78.6 0.9 (76.8–80.4)
Hawaii 2,758 77.3 1.1 (75.1–79.5)
Idaho 2,199 67.3 1.2 (65.0–69.6)
Illinois 2,417 74.6 1.0 (72.6–76.6)
Indiana 2,940 71.6 1.0 (69.7–73.5)
Iowa 2,379 77.5 1.0 (75.6–79.4)
Kansas 3,845 74.6 0.8 (73.1–76.1)
Kentucky 2,873 75.1 1.1 (72.9–77.3)
Louisiana 3,215 75.8 0.9 (74.1–77.5)
Maine 1,861 81.8 1.0 (79.8–83.8)
Maryland 3,985 79.8 0.9 (78.1–81.5)
Massachusetts 5,518 84.8 0.7 (83.5–86.1)
Michigan 2,740 79.9 0.9 (78.2–81.6)
Minnesota 1,945 81.4 1.0 (79.5–83.3)
Mississippi 3,031 67.8 1.0 (65.9–69.7)
Missouri 2,442 71.1 1.4 (68.3–73.9)
Montana 2,661 72.2 1.0 (70.2–74.2)
Nebraska 3,599 73.3 0.9 (71.5–75.1)
Nevada 1,422 70.7 1.7 (67.3–74.1)
New Hampshire 2,708 79.0 0.9 (77.2–80.8)
New Jersey 6,020 77.9 0.7 (76.6–79.2)
New Mexico 2,910 70.0 1.1 (67.9–72.1)
New York 2,688 79.3 0.9 (77.5–81.1)
North Carolina 7,317 79.2 0.6 (78.0–80.4)
North Dakota 2,176 77.2 1.1 (75.1–79.3)
Ohio 2,666 76.7 1.5 (73.7–79.7)
Oklahoma 3,279 67.7 0.9 (65.8–69.6)
Oregon 2,254 76.5 1.0 (74.5–78.5)
Pennsylvania 6,163 75.7 1.0 (73.8–77.6)
Rhode Island 2,105 84.5 0.9 (82.8–86.2)
South Carolina 4,192 74.5 0.9 (72.8–76.2)
South Dakota 3,045 74.2 1.0 (72.3–76.1)
Tennessee 2,158 79.4 1.1 (77.2–81.6)
Texas 3,082 71.0 1.4 (68.3–73.7)
Utah 1,953 68.2 1.3 (65.7–70.7)
Vermont 3,252 79.3 0.8 (77.8–80.8)
Virginia 2,448 76.5 1.3 (74.0–79.0)
Washington 11,179 76.0 0.5 (74.9–77.1)
West Virginia 1,750 74.5 1.2 (72.2–76.8)
Wisconsin 2,053 77.9 1.1 (75.8–80.0)
Wyoming 2,196 68.6 1.1 (66.5–70.7)
Puerto Rico 2,237 76.0 1.0 (74.0–78.0)
U.S.Virgin Islands 1,246 61.3 1.7 (58.1–64.5)
Median 76.5
Range 61.3–84.8
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
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Table 32

TABLE 32. Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 334 85.4 2.6 (80.3–90.5)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 791 75.2 1.8 (71.6–78.8)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 399 81.2 3.0 (75.3–87.1)
Asheville, North Carolina 276 79.6 3.1 (73.5–85.7)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 1,343 80.0 1.4 (77.2–82.8)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 225 79.0 3.3 (72.5–85.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 413 78.0 2.4 (73.3–82.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 207 73.5 3.8 (66.1–80.9)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 1,409 80.2 1.3 (77.7–82.7)
Barre, Vermont 343 81.9 2.3 (77.4–86.4)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 503 83.2 1.8 (79.8–86.6)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 756 78.9 1.8 (75.3–82.5)
Billings, Montana 212 70.1 3.6 (63.1–77.1)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 424 83.3 2.0 (79.4–87.2)
Bismarck, North Dakota 263 76.0 2.8 (70.5–81.5)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 543 67.8 2.3 (63.2–72.4)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 1,016 84.2 1.4 (81.4–87.0)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 447 80.1 2.1 (75.9–84.3)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 1,088 81.5 1.5 (78.6–84.4)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 922 79.4 1.4 (76.6–82.2)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 966 85.9 1.4 (83.1–88.7)
Camden, New Jersey§ 815 79.3 1.7 (76.1–82.5)
Casper, Wyoming 254 71.9 3.1 (65.9–77.9)
Charleston, West Virginia 326 73.3 2.7 (67.9–78.7)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 473 75.3 2.2 (70.9–79.7)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,068 79.3 1.6 (76.2–82.4)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 300 77.3 2.6 (72.1–82.5)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 1,658 75.7 1.3 (73.2–78.2)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 451 77.2 3.5 (70.3–84.1)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 480 77.2 3.7 (70.0–84.4)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 304 73.1 2.8 (67.6–78.6)
Columbia, South Carolina 470 78.7 2.4 (74.0–83.4)
Concord, New Hampshire 297 82.9 2.5 (78.0–87.8)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 226 75.9 4.0 (68.1–83.7)
Dayton, Ohio 377 77.5 4.5 (68.8–86.2)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 1,134 74.3 1.5 (71.4–77.2)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 412 82.2 2.1 (78.1–86.3)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 415 79.7 2.3 (75.1–84.3)
Dover, Delaware 608 81.8 1.7 (78.5–85.1)
Durham, North Carolina 454 82.6 2.1 (78.5–86.7)
Edison, New Jersey§ 1,323 76.6 1.3 (74.0–79.2)
El Paso, Texas 229 75.0 3.3 (68.6–81.4)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 775 85.3 1.8 (81.8–88.8)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 245 77.5 3.2 (71.2–83.8)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 307 80.2 3.8 (72.7–87.7)
Farmington, New Mexico 211 67.9 4.2 (59.7–76.1)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 257 84.8 2.5 (79.8–89.8)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 335 64.1 3.3 (57.7–70.5)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 210 75.3 4.4 (66.7–83.9)
Great Falls, Montana 239 79.6 2.9 (73.9–85.3)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 421 81.1 2.5 (76.3–85.9)
Greenville, South Carolina 380 76.8 2.6 (71.7–81.9)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 277 80.9 3.2 (74.6–87.2)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 1,221 84.2 1.2 (81.9–86.5)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 319 74.8 3.5 (68.0–81.6)
Hilo, Hawaii 608 77.8 1.9 (74.1–81.5)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 338 75.8 2.8 (70.3–81.3)
Honolulu, Hawaii 1,191 78.4 1.5 (75.5–81.3)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 212 67.2 5.0 (57.4–77.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 245 74.2 3.4 (67.5–80.9)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 896 73.5 1.7 (70.1–76.9)
Jackson, Mississippi 519 75.0 2.1 (70.8–79.2)
Jacksonville, Florida 336 79.8 2.9 (74.1–85.5)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 651 74.2 2.2 (69.9–78.5)
Kalispell, Montana 241 75.8 3.1 (69.8–81.8)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1,497 75.5 1.4 (72.8–78.2)
Kapaa, Hawaii 308 73.4 3.0 (67.4–79.4)
Keene, New Hampshire 220 74.9 3.2 (68.5–81.3)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 282 77.3 3.1 (71.3–83.3)

TABLE 32. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 227 66.1 3.8 (58.7–73.5)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 474 72.2 2.4 (67.6–76.8)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 718 78.4 1.7 (75.0–81.8)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 288 71.5 3.1 (65.5–77.5)
Lincoln, Nebraska 351 79.7 2.5 (74.8–84.6)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 546 76.8 2.1 (72.7–80.9)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 290 77.6 3.1 (71.5–83.7)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 413 77.7 2.4 (73.0–82.4)
Lubbock, Texas 274 76.0 2.8 (70.4–81.6)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 619 79.8 1.8 (76.3–83.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 413 73.8 2.9 (68.2–79.4)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 1,014 80.1 1.5 (77.2–83.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 571 81.6 2.2 (77.3–85.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,097 80.6 1.3 (78.1–83.1)
Missoula, Montana 220 72.5 3.4 (65.8–79.2)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 325 70.8 2.9 (65.1–76.5)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 295 78.5 2.7 (73.2–83.8)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 308 77.4 2.7 (72.1–82.7)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 1,493 77.9 1.5 (74.9–80.9)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 909 80.6 1.7 (77.4–83.8)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 687 79.4 1.9 (75.6–83.2)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 2,028 79.0 1.3 (76.4–81.6)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 278 82.6 2.6 (77.4–87.8)
Ocean City, New Jersey 299 76.5 2.8 (71.0–82.0)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 328 69.5 2.9 (63.8–75.2)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 995 70.2 1.7 (66.9–73.5)
Olympia, Washington 740 75.6 1.9 (71.9–79.3)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 719 76.3 1.8 (72.8–79.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 351 78.4 2.6 (73.4–83.4)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 1,247 79.3 1.9 (75.6–83.0)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 574 78.6 2.3 (74.0–83.2)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,741 72.6 2.1 (68.4–76.8)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 614 82.2 1.7 (78.9–85.5)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 1,700 79.5 1.3 (77.0–82.0)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 3,115 85.3 0.8 (83.7–86.9)
Provo-Orem, Utah 205 60.6 3.8 (53.1–68.1)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 513 82.3 2.1 (78.2–86.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 405 75.7 2.3 (71.2–80.2)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 502 72.8 2.2 (68.4–77.2)
Richmond, Virginia 391 79.0 2.6 (73.9–84.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 275 76.0 3.3 (69.6–82.4)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 753 79.2 1.7 (75.9–82.5)
Rutland, Vermont 341 82.0 2.3 (77.5–86.5)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 736 73.1 2.6 (68.0–78.2)
Salt Lake City, Utah 795 69.9 1.9 (66.1–73.7)
San Antonio, Texas 245 75.0 3.4 (68.4–81.6)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 213 75.5 3.4 (68.9–82.1)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 323 87.8 2.3 (83.3–92.3)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 262 66.8 3.4 (60.1–73.5)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 273 69.8 3.2 (63.6–76.0)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 1,270 75.6 3.1 (69.6–81.6)
Seaford, Delaware 635 84.5 1.7 (81.3–87.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 2,148 76.5 1.1 (74.3–78.7)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 285 78.8 2.6 (73.7–83.9)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 405 78.5 2.3 (73.9–83.1)
Spokane, Washington 548 76.4 2.2 (72.2–80.6)
Springfield, Massachusetts 735 85.8 1.8 (82.2–89.4)
Tacoma, Washington§ 723 77.8 1.8 (74.2–81.4)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 508 79.3 2.2 (74.9–83.7)
Toledo, Ohio 337 75.0 4.5 (66.2–83.8)
Topeka, Kansas 389 73.1 2.5 (68.2–78.0)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 224 81.9 3.0 (76.1–87.7)
Tucson, Arizona 409 80.2 2.5 (75.4–85.0)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 892 71.4 1.8 (67.9–74.9)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 519 77.9 2.4 (73.2–82.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 579 76.9 1.9 (73.1–80.7)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-
West Virginia§ 2,513 77.3 2.8 (71.9–82.7)
Wenatchee, Washington 482 79.9 2.3 (75.4–84.4)

TABLE 32. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 755 77.8 1.7 (74.4–81.2)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 787 82.8 1.6 (79.7–85.9)
Wilmington, North Carolina 350 83.2 2.5 (78.3–88.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 278 80.9 2.6 (75.8–86.0)
Worcester, Massachusetts 724 83.7 2.0 (79.8–87.6)
Yakima, Washington 358 76.3 2.6 (71.3–81.3)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 447 NAķ NA —
Yuma, Arizona 223 74.4 3.4 (67.8–81.0)
Median 77.8
Range 60.6–87.8
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
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Table 33

TABLE 33. Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States,
2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 264 83.9 2.6 (78.9–88.9)
Maricopa County, Arizona 373 78.9 2.5 (74.0–83.8)
Pima County, Arizona 409 80.2 2.5 (75.4–85.0)
Pinal County, Arizona 201 75.0 4.4 (66.4–83.6)
Yuma County, Arizona 223 74.4 3.4 (67.8–81.0)
Benton County, Arkansas 159 60.7 4.4 (52.0–69.4)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 311 79.6 2.7 (74.2–85.0)
Washington County, Arkansas 152 67.5 4.4 (58.9–76.1)
Alameda County, California 104 87.5 4.2 (79.3–95.7)
Los Angeles County, California 290 77.6 3.1 (71.5–83.7)
Riverside County, California 139 78.0 4.2 (69.8–86.2)
San Bernardino County, California 136 75.8 4.5 (66.9–84.7)
San Diego County, California 213 75.5 3.4 (68.9–82.1)
Adams County, Colorado 146 69.5 4.2 (61.2–77.8)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 266 78.0 2.9 (72.3–83.7)
Denver County, Colorado 236 75.8 3.3 (69.3–82.3)
Douglas County, Colorado 111 67.8 5.0 (58.0–77.6)
El Paso County, Colorado 294 73.3 2.8 (67.7–78.9)
Jefferson County, Colorado 313 75.3 2.8 (69.9–80.7)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 1,088 81.5 1.5 (78.6–84.4)
Hartford County, Connecticut 892 85.3 1.3 (82.7–87.9)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 178 83.6 3.4 (77.0–90.2)
New Haven County, Connecticut 909 80.6 1.7 (77.4–83.8)
New London County, Connecticut 278 82.6 2.6 (77.4–87.8)
Tolland County, Connecticut 151 80.6 3.5 (73.7–87.5)
Kent County, Delaware 608 81.8 1.7 (78.5–85.1)
New Castle County, Delaware 571 84.3 1.7 (81.0–87.6)
Sussex County, Delaware 635 84.5 1.7 (81.3–87.7)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 1,555 81.9 1.2 (79.6–84.2)
Broward County, Florida 327 81.8 2.6 (76.8–86.8)
Duval County, Florida 140 74.1 4.9 (64.5–83.7)
Hillsborough County, Florida 192 80.8 4.0 (73.0–88.6)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 445 76.2 2.4 (71.5–80.9)
Orange County, Florida 178 77.6 3.7 (70.4–84.8)
Palm Beach County, Florida 242 84.0 2.8 (78.5–89.5)
Pinellas County, Florida 189 79.2 3.6 (72.2–86.2)
Clayton County, Georgia 160 NA§ NA —
Cobb County, Georgia 166 80.8 3.4 (74.1–87.5)
DeKalb County, Georgia 204 86.4 3.0 (80.4–92.4)
Fulton County, Georgia 186 83.7 3.2 (77.5–89.9)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 148 82.1 3.4 (75.4–88.8)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 608 77.8 1.9 (74.1–81.5)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 1,191 78.4 1.5 (75.5–81.3)
Kauai County, Hawaii 308 73.4 3.0 (67.4–79.4)
Maui County, Hawaii 651 74.2 2.2 (69.9–78.5)
Ada County, Idaho 283 70.1 3.1 (64.0–76.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 198 68.0 3.8 (60.6–75.4)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 107 73.9 4.6 (65.0–82.8)
Cook County, Illinois 748 76.5 1.8 (72.9–80.1)
DuPage County, Illinois 168 74.6 3.8 (67.2–82.0)
Lake County, Illinois 132 76.8 4.2 (68.5–85.1)
Lake County, Indiana 228 64.3 4.1 (56.3–72.3)
Marion County, Indiana 576 71.9 2.3 (67.4–76.4)
Polk County, Iowa 315 82.7 2.4 (78.0–87.4)
Johnson County, Kansas 657 79.1 1.7 (75.7–82.5)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 560 77.4 2.1 (73.2–81.6)
Shawnee County, Kansas 284 76.1 2.7 (70.7–81.5)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 159 68.3 4.2 (60.1–76.5)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 216 81.0 3.0 (75.1–86.9)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 179 76.6 3.5 (69.8–83.4)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 283 88.2 2.0 (84.2–92.2)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 307 75.9 3.0 (69.9–81.9)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 131 82.5 4.3 (74.0–91.0)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 172 78.8 3.6 (71.7–85.9)
Cumberland County, Maine 336 84.9 2.1 (80.7–89.1)
York County, Maine 204 79.4 3.1 (73.3–85.5)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 252 78.7 3.0 (72.9–84.5)
Baltimore County, Maryland 453 80.8 2.3 (76.3–85.3)

TABLE 33. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United
States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Carroll County, Maryland 119 85.2 3.4 (78.6–91.8)
Cecil County, Maryland 125 74.4 4.8 (65.0–83.8)
Charles County, Maryland 116 77.4 4.4 (68.8–86.0)
Frederick County, Maryland 257 79.5 2.7 (74.1–84.9)
Harford County, Maryland 112 78.1 4.2 (69.9–86.3)
Howard County, Maryland 132 83.1 3.9 (75.4–90.8)
Montgomery County, Maryland 499 78.7 2.2 (74.4–83.0)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 292 78.0 3.1 (71.9–84.1)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 129 78.8 4.2 (70.5–87.1)
Washington County, Maryland 188 77.4 3.5 (70.6–84.2)
Baltimore city, Maryland 212 75.5 3.5 (68.7–82.3)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 1,010 86.3 1.8 (82.7–89.9)
Essex County, Massachusetts 775 85.1 1.8 (81.5–88.7)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 591 83.7 2.4 (79.0–88.4)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 966 85.7 1.5 (82.8–88.6)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 294 86.8 2.2 (82.5–91.1)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 232 80.7 2.9 (74.9–86.5)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 490 85.2 2.2 (80.9–89.5)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 724 83.7 2.0 (79.8–87.6)
Macomb County, Michigan 196 74.3 3.6 (67.3–81.3)
Oakland County, Michigan 286 82.6 2.4 (77.9–87.3)
Wayne County, Michigan 415 79.7 2.3 (75.1–84.3)
Dakota County, Minnesota 139 78.1 3.7 (70.9–85.3)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 412 80.5 2.2 (76.2–84.8)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 199 80.3 3.1 (74.2–86.4)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 124 74.3 4.2 (66.1–82.5)
Hinds County, Mississippi 225 75.2 3.2 (68.8–81.6)
Rankin County, Mississippi 113 79.8 4.4 (71.2–88.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 230 78.5 3.0 (72.5–84.5)
St. Louis County, Missouri 150 79.2 4.9 (69.7–88.7)
St. Louis city, Missouri 278 81.6 3.0 (75.7–87.5)
Cascade County, Montana 239 79.6 2.9 (73.9–85.3)
Flathead County, Montana 241 75.8 3.1 (69.8–81.8)
Missoula County, Montana 220 72.5 3.4 (65.8–79.2)
Yellowstone County, Montana 193 69.8 3.8 (62.4–77.2)
Douglas County, Nebraska 403 74.3 2.4 (69.5–79.1)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 330 80.7 2.5 (75.8–85.6)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 108 80.1 4.1 (72.1–88.1)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 266 68.8 3.2 (62.4–75.2)
Clark County, Nevada 474 72.2 2.4 (67.6–76.8)
Washoe County, Nevada 494 72.6 2.3 (68.2–77.0)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 220 74.9 3.2 (68.5–81.3)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 206 76.6 3.2 (70.3–82.9)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 619 79.8 1.8 (76.3–83.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 297 82.9 2.5 (78.0–87.8)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 465 81.1 2.0 (77.1–85.1)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 288 75.3 3.0 (69.5–81.1)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 225 79.0 3.3 (72.5–85.5)
Bergen County, New Jersey 428 80.0 2.3 (75.5–84.5)
Burlington County, New Jersey 246 81.3 2.9 (75.7–86.9)
Camden County, New Jersey 317 79.1 2.8 (73.7–84.5)
Cape May County, New Jersey 299 76.5 2.8 (71.0–82.0)
Essex County, New Jersey 460 76.3 2.8 (70.9–81.7)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 252 76.1 3.0 (70.3–81.9)
Hudson County, New Jersey 322 76.6 3.3 (70.1–83.1)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 240 76.7 2.9 (71.0–82.4)
Mercer County, New Jersey 224 81.9 3.0 (76.1–87.7)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 330 77.1 3.0 (71.3–82.9)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 343 76.8 2.5 (71.9–81.7)
Morris County, New Jersey 324 80.7 2.7 (75.4–86.0)
Ocean County, New Jersey 393 76.3 2.4 (71.6–81.0)
Passaic County, New Jersey 392 79.2 2.9 (73.5–84.9)
Somerset County, New Jersey 257 75.8 3.1 (69.7–81.9)
Sussex County, New Jersey 245 71.9 3.2 (65.6–78.2)
Union County, New Jersey 211 82.4 3.2 (76.1–88.7)
Warren County, New Jersey 254 69.3 3.6 (62.3–76.3)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 498 76.4 2.2 (72.0–80.8)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 227 66.1 3.8 (58.7–73.5)

TABLE 33. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United
States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 165 78.4 3.7 (71.2–85.6)
San Juan County, New Mexico 211 67.9 4.2 (59.7–76.1)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 262 66.8 3.4 (60.1–73.5)
Kings County, New York 203 79.4 3.3 (72.9–85.9)
Nassau County, New York 157 76.5 3.9 (68.9–84.1)
New York County, New York 193 74.5 4.3 (66.2–82.8)
Queens County, New York 170 79.8 3.6 (72.8–86.8)
Suffolk County, New York 151 77.9 3.9 (70.3–85.5)
Westchester County, New York 130 82.2 3.7 (74.9–89.5)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 180 85.9 2.8 (80.5–91.3)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 193 79.8 3.3 (73.4–86.2)
Catawba County, North Carolina 200 82.4 3.1 (76.4–88.4)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 215 85.2 2.7 (79.9–90.5)
Durham County, North Carolina 163 88.9 2.7 (83.6–94.2)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 191 82.5 3.1 (76.4–88.6)
Gaston County, North Carolina 191 84.6 2.8 (79.1–90.1)
Guilford County, North Carolina 196 80.2 3.5 (73.4–87.0)
Johnston County, North Carolina 174 77.5 3.5 (70.6–84.4)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 378 79.6 2.4 (74.9–84.3)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 216 82.0 3.3 (75.6–88.4)
Orange County, North Carolina 173 78.5 3.8 (71.1–85.9)
Randolph County, North Carolina 174 80.3 3.5 (73.4–87.2)
Union County, North Carolina 182 80.9 3.1 (74.8–87.0)
Wake County, North Carolina 289 85.1 2.4 (80.5–89.7)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 189 73.3 3.5 (66.5–80.1)
Cass County, North Dakota 283 82.1 2.6 (77.1–87.1)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 208 77.7 4.6 (68.7–86.7)
Hamilton County, Ohio 174 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 230 78.6 4.8 (69.1–88.1)
Lucas County, Ohio 312 77.3 2.9 (71.6–83.0)
Mahoning County, Ohio 407 83.5 2.3 (79.1–87.9)
Montgomery County, Ohio 359 74.4 4.6 (65.5–83.3)
Summit County, Ohio 318 81.4 3.1 (75.3–87.5)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 165 71.4 4.0 (63.6–79.2)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 592 70.5 2.2 (66.2–74.8)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 645 70.8 2.2 (66.5–75.1)
Clackamas County, Oregon 210 79.2 3.1 (73.1–85.3)
Lane County, Oregon 245 77.5 3.2 (71.2–83.8)
Multnomah County, Oregon 329 80.1 2.4 (75.3–84.9)
Washington County, Oregon 213 82.6 2.9 (77.0–88.2)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 228 73.2 3.2 (66.8–79.6)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 1,176 68.9 3.1 (62.8–75.0)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 1,200 70.4 3.4 (63.8–77.0)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 148 79.5 3.9 (71.8–87.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 826 69.9 3.8 (62.4–77.4)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 143 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 280 86.6 2.2 (82.3–90.9)
Newport County, Rhode Island 182 85.4 2.9 (79.7–91.1)
Providence County, Rhode Island 1,311 83.1 1.2 (80.8–85.4)
Washington County, Rhode Island 237 86.9 2.4 (82.2–91.6)
Aiken County, South Carolina 243 74.3 3.3 (67.9–80.7)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 300 78.3 2.8 (72.8–83.8)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 101 78.1 4.4 (69.5–86.7)
Charleston County, South Carolina 284 77.1 2.8 (71.5–82.7)
Greenville County, South Carolina 230 75.2 3.4 (68.4–82.0)
Horry County, South Carolina 325 70.8 2.9 (65.1–76.5)
Lexington County, South Carolina 152 76.3 3.9 (68.7–83.9)
Richland County, South Carolina 197 77.6 4.0 (69.8–85.4)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 311 79.7 2.5 (74.8–84.6)
Pennington County, South Dakota 325 77.2 2.6 (72.2–82.2)
Davidson County, Tennessee 139 80.7 3.7 (73.5–87.9)
Shelby County, Tennessee 148 75.2 4.3 (66.9–83.5)
Bexar County, Texas 178 80.4 3.7 (73.2–87.6)
Dallas County, Texas 164 78.3 4.3 (69.8–86.8)
El Paso County, Texas 229 75.0 3.3 (68.6–81.4)
Harris County, Texas 147 NA NA —
Lubbock County, Texas 265 76.3 2.9 (70.6–82.0)
Tarrant County, Texas 187 75.5 4.7 (66.4–84.6)

TABLE 33. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of women aged >40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United
States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Travis County, Texas 120 NA NA —
Davis County, Utah 157 66.8 4.2 (58.6–75.0)
Salt Lake County, Utah 608 69.6 2.1 (65.6–73.6)
Summit County, Utah 100 81.4 4.8 (72.1–90.7)
Tooele County, Utah 87 NA NA —
Utah County, Utah 192 60.0 3.9 (52.3–67.7)
Weber County, Utah 163 73.7 4.0 (65.8–81.6)
Chittenden County, Vermont 688 81.4 1.6 (78.4–84.4)
Franklin County, Vermont 183 78.2 3.2 (71.9–84.5)
Orange County, Vermont 173 76.7 3.6 (69.7–83.7)
Rutland County, Vermont 341 82.0 2.3 (77.5–86.5)
Washington County, Vermont 343 81.9 2.3 (77.4–86.4)
Windsor County, Vermont 339 81.0 2.1 (76.8–85.2)
Asotin County, Washington 181 67.1 4.0 (59.2–75.0)
Benton County, Washington 169 79.0 3.5 (72.0–86.0)
Chelan County, Washington 249 78.4 3.1 (72.3–84.5)
Clark County, Washington 717 77.5 1.8 (74.0–81.0)
Douglas County, Washington 233 83.5 2.7 (78.2–88.8)
Franklin County, Washington 113 70.4 5.1 (60.4–80.4)
King County, Washington 1,406 77.5 1.3 (75.0–80.0)
Kitsap County, Washington 447 80.1 2.1 (75.9–84.3)
Pierce County, Washington 723 77.6 1.8 (74.1–81.1)
Snohomish County, Washington 742 75.0 1.8 (71.4–78.6)
Spokane County, Washington 548 76.4 2.2 (72.2–80.6)
Thurston County, Washington 740 75.6 1.9 (71.9–79.3)
Yakima County, Washington 358 76.3 2.6 (71.3–81.3)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 223 75.2 3.2 (68.9–81.5)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 394 78.5 3.3 (72.1–84.9)
Laramie County, Wyoming 300 77.3 2.6 (72.1–82.5)
Natrona County, Wyoming 254 71.9 3.1 (65.9–77.9)
Median 78.3
Range 60.0–88.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 34

TABLE 34. Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test* during the preceding 2 years, by state/territory —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Alabama 782 56.6 2.0 (52.7–60.5)
Alaska 565 45.9 3.0 (39.9–51.9)
Arizona 1,289 56.1 2.5 (51.2–61.0)
Arkansas 1,441 52.8 1.5 (49.9–55.7)
California 1,489 49.3 1.6 (46.1–52.5)
Colorado 1,678 53.8 1.4 (51.1–56.5)
Connecticut 2,302 54.7 1.3 (52.1–57.3)
Delaware 1,065 56.9 2.0 (52.9–60.9)
District of Columbia 959 58.8 2.0 (54.9–62.7)
Florida 2,890 60.1 1.3 (57.6–62.6)
Georgia 1,925 57.2 1.4 (54.4–60.0)
Hawaii 1,906 40.0 1.4 (37.2–42.8)
Idaho 1,405 51.3 1.6 (48.2–54.4)
Illinois 1,356 47.9 1.7 (44.7–51.1)
Indiana 1,590 49.6 1.4 (46.8–52.4)
Iowa 1,490 52.7 1.4 (49.9–55.5)
Kansas 2,234 54.8 1.2 (52.5–57.1)
Kentucky 1,299 53.0 1.9 (49.3–56.7)
Louisiana 1,632 55.8 1.4 (53.0–58.6)
Maine 1,078 48.0 1.7 (44.7–51.3)
Maryland 2,351 55.7 1.4 (53.0–58.4)
Massachusetts 3,081 56.1 1.2 (53.7–58.5)
Michigan 1,464 56.9 1.5 (53.9–59.9)
Minnesota 1,222 48.8 1.6 (45.8–51.8)
Mississippi 1,425 54.7 1.5 (51.7–57.7)
Missouri 1,421 51.7 2.1 (47.7–55.7)
Montana 1,769 56.3 1.4 (53.5–59.1)
Nebraska 2,283 51.9 1.3 (49.3–54.5)
Nevada 1,101 52.7 2.2 (48.3–57.1)
New Hampshire 1,686 50.2 1.4 (47.4–53.0)
New Jersey 3,685 55.4 1.1 (53.3–57.5)
New Mexico 1,733 49.0 1.5 (46.1–51.9)
New York 1,588 54.5 1.6 (51.4–57.6)
North Carolina 3,924 55.7 1.0 (53.7–57.7)
North Dakota 1,363 52.2 1.6 (49.1–55.3)
Ohio 1,500 56.1 2.2 (51.7–60.5)
Oklahoma 1,781 51.7 1.4 (49.0–54.4)
Oregon 1,310 50.0 1.5 (47.0–53.0)
Pennsylvania 3,387 53.0 1.5 (50.0–56.0)
Rhode Island 1,159 61.0 1.7 (57.8–64.2)
South Carolina 2,518 56.3 1.3 (53.8–58.8)
South Dakota 1,860 54.4 1.4 (51.7–57.1)
Tennessee 1,092 54.3 1.9 (50.5–58.1)
Texas 1,661 48.4 2.0 (44.4–52.4)
Utah 1,353 46.6 1.7 (43.3–49.9)
Vermont 2,044 47.7 1.2 (45.3–50.1)
Virginia 1,398 53.5 2.0 (49.5–57.5)
Washington 6,472 48.0 0.8 (46.4–49.6)
West Virginia 1,086 54.1 1.7 (50.8–57.4)
Wisconsin 1,310 48.4 1.7 (45.1–51.7)
Wyoming 1,429 63.0 1.4 (60.2–65.8)
Puerto Rico 1,159 65.7 1.6 (62.5–68.9)
U.S.Virgin Islands 791 58.3 2.1 (54.2–62.4)
Median 53.8
Range 40.0–65.7
* Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test is a blood test used to check for prostate cancer.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 35

TABLE 35. Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test* during the preceding 2 years, by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 184 NAķ NA —
Albuquerque, New Mexico 468 51.3 2.7 (45.9–56.7)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 224 NA NA —
Asheville, North Carolina 141 63.5 5.0 (53.8–73.2)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 736 58.5 2.3 (54.1–62.9)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 159 60.5 4.4 (51.9–69.1)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 249 64.7 3.7 (57.4–72.0)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 157 52.4 4.7 (43.3–61.5)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 832 55.8 2.1 (51.7–59.9)
Barre, Vermont 210 43.6 3.7 (36.3–50.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 281 56.4 3.4 (49.7–63.1)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland** 472 53.8 3.1 (47.8–59.8)
Billings, Montana 136 66.7 4.4 (58.0–75.4)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 221 64.5 3.5 (57.6–71.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 149 53.9 4.4 (45.3–62.5)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 311 52.0 3.2 (45.7–58.3)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts** 582 55.5 2.6 (50.5–60.5)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 238 54.8 3.6 (47.8–61.8)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 713 60.3 2.5 (55.4–65.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 579 46.8 2.3 (42.4–51.2)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts** 598 54.3 2.8 (48.9–59.7)
Camden, New Jersey** 503 52.8 2.8 (47.4–58.2)
Casper, Wyoming 163 62.7 4.0 (54.8–70.6)
Charleston, West Virginia 192 58.2 4.0 (50.3–66.1)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 285 57.9 3.3 (51.4–64.4)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 548 53.6 2.6 (48.4–58.8)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 214 58.3 3.8 (50.8–65.8)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 941 46.2 2.1 (42.0–50.4)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 232 NA NA —
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 241 NA NA —
Colorado Springs, Colorado 204 53.2 3.9 (45.6–60.8)
Columbia, South Carolina 269 59.1 3.6 (52.1–66.1)
Concord, New Hampshire 176 50.7 4.2 (42.4–59.0)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas** 138 NA NA —
Dayton, Ohio 208 NA NA —
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 769 56.0 2.0 (52.0–60.0)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 233 50.1 3.6 (43.0–57.2)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan** 194 54.5 4.5 (45.6–63.4)
Dover, Delaware 347 65.4 2.9 (59.6–71.2)
Durham, North Carolina 272 53.9 3.7 (46.6–61.2)
Edison, New Jersey** 820 58.1 2.1 (54.0–62.2)
El Paso, Texas 113 NA NA —
Essex County, Massachusetts** 440 58.4 3.6 (51.4–65.4)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 150 50.5 4.4 (41.8–59.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 170 NA NA —
Farmington, New Mexico 132 NA NA —
Fayetteville, North Carolina 105 NA NA —
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 205 50.5 4.4 (41.8–59.2)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas** 123 NA NA —
Great Falls, Montana 152 57.3 4.5 (48.5–66.1)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 258 56.1 4.1 (48.1–64.1)
Greenville, South Carolina 243 50.0 3.7 (42.8–57.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 170 58.1 4.8 (48.7–67.5)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 694 53.4 2.2 (49.1–57.7)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 171 60.0 4.6 (51.0–69.0)
Hilo, Hawaii 431 40.2 2.6 (35.2–45.2)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 211 64.1 4.1 (56.0–72.2)
Honolulu, Hawaii 868 39.7 1.9 (36.0–43.4)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 132 NA NA —
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 111 NA NA —
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 484 53.0 2.6 (47.9–58.1)
Jackson, Mississippi 211 52.9 4.0 (45.2–60.6)
Jacksonville, Florida 157 60.7 5.1 (50.7–70.7)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 420 41.9 3.1 (35.8–48.0)
Kalispell, Montana 146 53.6 4.8 (44.3–62.9)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 813 56.3 2.3 (51.9–60.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 187 39.8 4.1 (31.7–47.9)
Keene, New Hampshire 149 59.3 4.5 (50.4–68.2)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 169 55.9 5.0 (46.2–65.6)

TABLE 35. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test* during the preceding 2 years, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 136 43.8 4.8 (34.5–53.1)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 347 53.0 3.1 (46.9–59.1)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 463 50.2 2.6 (45.1–55.3)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 173 47.6 4.5 (38.9–56.3)
Lincoln, Nebraska 236 45.0 3.5 (38.1–51.9)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 312 58.2 3.2 (52.0–64.4)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California** 193 55.3 4.5 (46.5–64.1)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 194 51.2 4.1 (43.2–59.2)
Lubbock, Texas 121 NA NA —
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 394 51.0 2.8 (45.4–56.6)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 180 57.8 4.9 (48.1–67.5)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 544 56.7 2.7 (51.5–61.9)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 314 53.9 3.9 (46.3–61.5)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 685 45.7 2.1 (41.7–49.7)
Missoula, Montana 141 NA NA —
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 227 58.8 3.8 (51.4–66.2)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 136 48.7 4.8 (39.3–58.1)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York** 213 62.8 4.0 (54.9–70.7)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania** 930 51.9 2.4 (47.3–56.5)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 526 53.4 2.9 (47.7–59.1)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 372 56.3 3.3 (49.9–62.7)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey** 1,202 55.6 2.4 (50.9–60.3)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 156 54.9 4.7 (45.7–64.1)
Ocean City, New Jersey 157 65.1 4.9 (55.4–74.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 216 47.0 3.8 (39.6–54.4)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 502 52.6 2.5 (47.7–57.5)
Olympia, Washington 397 50.0 2.8 (44.5–55.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 455 53.5 2.6 (48.3–58.7)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 198 66.9 4.0 (59.1–74.7)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania** 568 53.5 3.3 (47.1–59.9)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 352 56.0 3.7 (48.7–63.3)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 948 57.4 3.3 (50.9–63.9)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 327 50.0 3.0 (44.1–55.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 964 47.8 2.1 (43.7–51.9)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 1,658 58.4 1.7 (55.2–61.6)
Provo-Orem, Utah 113 45.6 5.1 (35.6–55.6)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 275 55.2 3.9 (47.6–62.8)
Rapid City, South Dakota 270 52.0 3.3 (45.5–58.5)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 380 48.3 2.9 (42.5–54.1)
Richmond, Virginia 222 51.2 4.0 (43.4–59.0)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 174 46.7 4.4 (38.1–55.3)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire** 414 48.2 2.7 (42.8–53.6)
Rutland, Vermont 210 51.3 3.7 (44.0–58.6)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 408 49.8 3.7 (42.5–57.1)
Salt Lake City, Utah 574 46.2 2.5 (41.3–51.1)
San Antonio, Texas 139 53.8 5.1 (43.8–63.8)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 159 51.4 4.5 (42.6–60.2)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 215 39.5 4.1 (31.5–47.5)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 169 56.4 4.4 (47.7–65.1)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 157 49.1 4.4 (40.5–57.7)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 744 53.8 4.6 (44.7–62.9)
Seaford, Delaware 374 59.6 2.9 (54.0–65.2)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington** 1,263 45.1 1.7 (41.7–48.5)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 144 57.8 4.8 (48.4–67.2)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 235 53.8 3.5 (46.9–60.7)
Spokane, Washington 325 48.6 3.2 (42.2–55.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 381 52.1 3.5 (45.2–59.0)
Tacoma, Washington** 412 46.4 2.8 (41.0–51.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 291 65.6 3.3 (59.2–72.0)
Toledo, Ohio 195 NA NA —
Topeka, Kansas 184 55.6 4.0 (47.8–63.4)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 147 53.5 5.0 (43.7–63.3)
Tucson, Arizona 198 54.9 4.2 (46.6–63.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 480 51.9 2.8 (46.4–57.4)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 275 56.8 4.2 (48.5–65.1)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan** 319 59.9 3.1 (53.8–66.0)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia** 1,528 50.2 4.4 (41.5–58.9)
Wenatchee, Washington 332 51.5 3.4 (44.8–58.2)

TABLE 35. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test* during the preceding 2 years, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 444 55.1 2.7 (49.9–60.3)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey** 474 54.6 2.8 (49.1–60.1)
Wilmington, North Carolina 172 61.2 4.5 (52.3–70.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 171 46.8 4.3 (38.4–55.2)
Worcester, Massachusetts 402 58.0 3.4 (51.3–64.7)
Yakima, Washington 184 52.0 4.2 (43.8–60.2)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 252 NA NA —
Yuma, Arizona 137 54.3 5.0 (44.5–64.1)
Median 53.8
Range 39.5–66.9
* Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test is a blood test used to check for prostate cancer.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the CI half width is >10.
** Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 36

TABLE 36. Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test* during the preceding 2 years, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Jefferson County, Alabama 135 67.3 4.3 (58.8–75.8)
Maricopa County, Arizona 232 56.4 3.9 (48.7–64.1)
Pima County, Arizona 198 54.9 4.2 (46.6–63.2)
Pinal County, Arizona 120 NAķ NA —
Yuma County, Arizona 137 54.3 5.0 (44.5–64.1)
Benton County, Arkansas 111 NA NA —
Pulaski County, Arkansas 179 63.7 4.0 (55.8–71.6)
Washington County, Arkansas 80 NA NA —
Alameda County, California 82 NA NA —
Los Angeles County, California 193 55.3 4.5 (46.5–64.1)
Riverside County, California 94 NA NA —
San Bernardino County, California 80 NA NA —
San Diego County, California 159 51.4 4.5 (42.6–60.2)
Adams County, Colorado 111 NA NA —
Arapahoe County, Colorado 168 61.5 4.4 (52.9–70.1)
Denver County, Colorado 159 49.5 4.7 (40.3–58.7)
Douglas County, Colorado 63 NA NA —
El Paso County, Colorado 192 53.8 4.0 (46.0–61.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 216 55.2 3.6 (48.1–62.3)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 713 60.3 2.5 (55.4–65.2)
Hartford County, Connecticut 473 52.7 2.7 (47.5–57.9)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 105 NA NA —
New Haven County, Connecticut 526 53.4 2.9 (47.7–59.1)
New London County, Connecticut 156 54.9 4.7 (45.7–64.1)
Tolland County, Connecticut 116 NA NA —
Kent County, Delaware 347 65.4 2.9 (59.6–71.2)
New Castle County, Delaware 344 53.5 3.1 (47.4–59.6)
Sussex County, Delaware 374 59.6 2.9 (54.0–65.2)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 959 58.6 2.0 (54.7–62.5)
Broward County, Florida 183 53.3 4.5 (44.5–62.1)
Duval County, Florida 68 NA NA —
Hillsborough County, Florida 119 NA NA —
Miami-Dade County, Florida 218 54.5 4.0 (46.7–62.3)
Orange County, Florida 92 NA NA —
Palm Beach County, Florida 143 63.3 5.1 (53.4–73.2)
Pinellas County, Florida 88 NA NA —
Clayton County, Georgia 82 NA NA —
Cobb County, Georgia 100 NA NA —
DeKalb County, Georgia 97 NA NA —
Fulton County, Georgia 100 NA NA —
Gwinnett County, Georgia 82 NA NA —
Hawaii County, Hawaii 431 40.2 2.6 (35.2–45.2)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 868 39.7 1.9 (36.0–43.4)
Kauai County, Hawaii 187 39.8 4.1 (31.7–47.9)
Maui County, Hawaii 420 41.9 3.1 (35.8–48.0)
Ada County, Idaho 154 52.9 4.5 (44.0–61.8)
Canyon County, Idaho 112 NA NA —
Nez Perce County, Idaho 84 NA NA —
Cook County, Illinois 408 48.9 3.1 (42.8–55.0)
DuPage County, Illinois 98 NA NA —
Lake County, Illinois 66 NA NA —
Lake County, Indiana 136 NA NA —
Marion County, Indiana 280 54.7 3.4 (48.0–61.4)
Polk County, Iowa 174 45.1 4.2 (36.9–53.3)
Johnson County, Kansas 347 57.6 2.9 (51.9–63.3)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 334 55.3 3.1 (49.2–61.4)
Shawnee County, Kansas 132 53.6 4.8 (44.2–63.0)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 77 NA NA —
Jefferson County, Kentucky 93 NA NA —
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 89 NA NA —
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 167 55.7 4.3 (47.2–64.2)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 152 51.1 4.6 (42.1–60.1)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 75 NA NA —
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 108 64.6 4.9 (54.9–74.3)
Cumberland County, Maine 161 50.4 4.3 (41.9–58.9)
York County, Maine 126 52.2 4.7 (42.9–61.5)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 165 55.0 4.6 (45.9–64.1)
Baltimore County, Maryland 240 56.3 3.7 (49.0–63.6)
Carroll County, Maryland 66 NA NA —

TABLE 36. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test during the preceding 2 years, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 82 NA NA —
Charles County, Maryland 83 NA NA —
Frederick County, Maryland 153 49.6 4.7 (40.3–58.9)
Harford County, Maryland 89 NA NA —
Howard County, Maryland 87 NA NA —
Montgomery County, Maryland 319 54.6 3.7 (47.3–61.9)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 172 55.7 4.6 (46.7–64.7)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 69 NA NA —
Washington County, Maryland 111 NA NA —
Baltimore city, Maryland 116 NA NA —
Bristol County, Massachusetts 499 50.2 4.0 (42.3–58.1)
Essex County, Massachusetts 440 58.4 3.6 (51.3–65.5)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 288 51.5 4.5 (42.7–60.3)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 598 55.4 2.7 (50.1–60.7)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 172 59.7 4.3 (51.3–68.1)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 142 54.2 4.8 (44.7–63.7)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 268 52.0 3.8 (44.6–59.4)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 402 58.0 3.4 (51.3–64.7)
Macomb County, Michigan 99 NA NA —
Oakland County, Michigan 148 64.4 4.5 (55.7–73.1)
Wayne County, Michigan 194 54.5 4.5 (45.6–63.4)
Dakota County, Minnesota 79 NA NA —
Hennepin County, Minnesota 245 48.3 3.4 (41.6–55.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 105 NA NA —
DeSoto County, Mississippi 58 NA NA —
Hinds County, Mississippi 89 NA NA —
Rankin County, Mississippi 72 NA NA —
Jackson County, Missouri 135 NA NA —
St. Louis County, Missouri 81 NA NA —
St. Louis city, Missouri 149 NA NA —
Cascade County, Montana 152 57.3 4.5 (48.5–66.1)
Flathead County, Montana 146 53.6 4.8 (44.3–62.9)
Missoula County, Montana 141 NA NA —
Yellowstone County, Montana 120 64.3 4.8 (54.9–73.7)
Douglas County, Nebraska 241 51.6 3.6 (44.5–58.7)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 218 45.9 3.6 (38.8–53.0)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 76 NA NA —
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 154 49.8 4.4 (41.2–58.4)
Clark County, Nevada 347 53.0 3.1 (46.9–59.1)
Washoe County, Nevada 374 48.4 3.0 (42.6–54.2)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 149 59.3 4.5 (50.4–68.2)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 141 51.3 4.5 (42.4–60.2)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 394 51.0 2.8 (45.4–56.6)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 176 50.7 4.2 (42.4–59.0)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 264 49.8 3.5 (43.0–56.6)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 150 45.2 4.4 (36.7–53.7)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 159 60.5 4.4 (51.9–69.1)
Bergen County, New Jersey 293 65.2 3.4 (58.6–71.8)
Burlington County, New Jersey 174 56.1 4.4 (47.4–64.8)
Camden County, New Jersey 172 52.7 4.5 (43.9–61.5)
Cape May County, New Jersey 157 65.1 4.9 (55.4–74.8)
Essex County, New Jersey 237 53.2 4.1 (45.2–61.2)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 157 52.9 4.8 (43.6–62.2)
Hudson County, New Jersey 182 NA NA —
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 153 57.7 4.6 (48.8–66.6)
Mercer County, New Jersey 147 53.5 5.0 (43.7–63.3)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 223 53.2 4.1 (45.2–61.2)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 233 53.4 3.9 (45.7–61.1)
Morris County, New Jersey 214 51.7 4.2 (43.5–59.9)
Ocean County, New Jersey 204 71.7 3.7 (64.5–78.9)
Passaic County, New Jersey 229 48.5 4.7 (39.2–57.8)
Somerset County, New Jersey 160 54.3 4.7 (45.1–63.5)
Sussex County, New Jersey 172 51.2 4.5 (42.3–60.1)
Union County, New Jersey 145 51.6 4.9 (42.0–61.2)
Warren County, New Jersey 143 NA NA —
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 290 51.9 3.3 (45.4–58.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 136 43.8 4.8 (34.5–53.1)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 90 NA NA —
San Juan County, New Mexico 132 NA NA —

TABLE 36. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test during the preceding 2 years, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 169 56.4 4.4 (47.7–65.1)
Kings County, New York 95 NA NA —
Nassau County, New York 107 NA NA —
New York County, New York 118 NA NA —
Queens County, New York 106 NA NA —
Suffolk County, New York 106 NA NA —
Westchester County, New York 72 NA NA —
Buncombe County, North Carolina 92 NA NA —
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 96 NA NA —
Catawba County, North Carolina 113 NA NA —
Cumberland County, North Carolina 86 NA NA —
Durham County, North Carolina 96 NA NA —
Forsyth County, North Carolina 117 NA NA —
Gaston County, North Carolina 104 NA NA —
Guilford County, North Carolina 126 NA NA —
Johnston County, North Carolina 114 NA NA —
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 171 53.4 4.5 (44.6–62.2)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 86 NA NA —
Orange County, North Carolina 99 NA NA —
Randolph County, North Carolina 103 NA NA —
Union County, North Carolina 91 NA NA —
Wake County, North Carolina 142 58.4 4.7 (49.1–67.7)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 111 51.1 5.1 (41.1–61.1)
Cass County, North Dakota 158 48.2 4.3 (39.7–56.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 86 NA NA —
Hamilton County, Ohio 93 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 134 NA NA —
Lucas County, Ohio 178 54.6 4.6 (45.6–63.6)
Mahoning County, Ohio 221 NA NA —
Montgomery County, Ohio 186 NA NA —
Summit County, Ohio 175 NA NA —
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 87 NA NA —
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 288 51.1 3.3 (44.6–57.6)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 347 51.8 3.1 (45.7–57.9)
Clackamas County, Oregon 117 49.5 5.1 (39.5–59.5)
Lane County, Oregon 150 50.5 4.4 (41.8–59.2)
Multnomah County, Oregon 203 46.7 3.8 (39.2–54.2)
Washington County, Oregon 112 NA NA —
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 151 57.0 4.5 (48.1–65.9)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 630 58.3 2.2 (54.0–62.6)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 702 51.5 4.4 (42.9–60.1)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 77 NA NA —
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 339 NA NA —
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 71 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 195 63.1 3.9 (55.5–70.7)
Newport County, Rhode Island 106 NA NA —
Providence County, Rhode Island 658 56.6 2.3 (52.2–61.0)
Washington County, Rhode Island 154 67.7 4.3 (59.3–76.1)
Aiken County, South Carolina 152 59.7 4.9 (50.1–69.3)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 195 68.7 4.0 (60.8–76.6)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 76 NA NA —
Charleston County, South Carolina 153 62.0 4.5 (53.1–70.9)
Greenville County, South Carolina 156 45.1 4.4 (36.5–53.7)
Horry County, South Carolina 227 58.8 3.8 (51.4–66.2)
Lexington County, South Carolina 86 NA NA —
Richland County, South Carolina 109 NA NA —
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 169 52.6 4.1 (44.5–60.7)
Pennington County, South Dakota 201 52.5 3.9 (44.9–60.1)
Davidson County, Tennessee 55 NA NA —
Shelby County, Tennessee 59 NA NA —
Bexar County, Texas 102 NA NA —
Dallas County, Texas 96 NA NA —
El Paso County, Texas 113 NA NA —
Harris County, Texas 85 NA NA —
Lubbock County, Texas 117 NA NA —
Tarrant County, Texas 107 NA NA —
Travis County, Texas 88 NA NA —
Davis County, Utah 112 NA NA —
Salt Lake County, Utah 429 45.9 2.7 (40.5–51.3)

TABLE 36. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of men aged >40 years who had a PSA test during the preceding 2 years, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 68 NA NA —
Tooele County, Utah 77 NA NA —
Utah County, Utah 106 NA NA —
Weber County, Utah 102 NA NA —
Chittenden County, Vermont 411 47.0 2.7 (41.7–52.3)
Franklin County, Vermont 139 46.4 4.6 (37.4–55.4)
Orange County, Vermont 115 48.6 5.1 (38.7–58.5)
Rutland County, Vermont 210 51.3 3.7 (44.0–58.6)
Washington County, Vermont 210 43.6 3.7 (36.3–50.9)
Windsor County, Vermont 207 48.8 3.7 (41.5–56.1)
Asotin County, Washington 89 NA NA —
Benton County, Washington 92 NA NA —
Chelan County, Washington 185 50.1 4.4 (41.5–58.7)
Clark County, Washington 393 49.0 2.8 (43.5–54.5)
Douglas County, Washington 147 55.7 4.7 (46.5–64.9)
Franklin County, Washington 77 NA NA —
King County, Washington 889 45.3 1.8 (41.7–48.9)
Kitsap County, Washington 238 54.8 3.6 (47.8–61.8)
Pierce County, Washington 412 46.4 2.8 (41.0–51.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 374 44.8 2.9 (39.0–50.6)
Spokane County, Washington 325 48.6 3.2 (42.2–55.0)
Thurston County, Washington 397 50.0 2.8 (44.5–55.5)
Yakima County, Washington 184 52.0 4.2 (43.8–60.2)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 116 58.2 5.1 (48.2–68.2)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 214 NA NA —
Laramie County, Wyoming 214 58.3 3.8 (50.8–65.8)
Natrona County, Wyoming 163 62.7 4.0 (54.8–70.6)
Median 53.4
Range 39.7–71.7
* Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test is a blood test used to check for prostate cancer.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 37

TABLE 37. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who currently
smoke,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Alabama 3,278 23.2 1.1 (21.1–25.3)
Alaska 2,098 24.0 1.4 (21.3–26.7)
Arizona 4,785 18.2 1.2 (15.9–20.5)
Arkansas 5,566 23.7 0.7 (22.2–25.2)
California 5,699 14.9 0.7 (13.6–16.2)
Colorado 6,087 17.9 0.6 (16.6–19.2)
Connecticut 8,446 17.0 0.6 (15.9–18.1)
Delaware 3,994 21.7 1.0 (19.7–23.7)
District of Columbia 3,992 17.9 0.9 (16.2–19.6)
Florida 10,682 21.0 0.6 (19.7–22.3)
Georgia 7,668 19.9 0.7 (18.6–21.2)
Hawaii 6,525 17.5 0.7 (16.2–18.8)
Idaho 5,328 16.8 0.7 (15.4–18.2)
Illinois 5,173 20.5 0.8 (18.9–22.1)
Indiana 6,521 24.1 0.7 (22.7–25.5)
Iowa 5,425 21.4 0.7 (20.0–22.8)
Kansas 8,280 20.0 0.6 (18.8–21.2)
Kentucky 6,167 28.5 0.9 (26.7–30.3)
Louisiana 7,055 23.4 0.7 (22.0–24.8)
Maine 4,016 20.9 0.8 (19.3–22.5)
Maryland 8,866 17.7 0.6 (16.5–18.9)
Massachusetts 12,660 17.8 0.6 (16.6–19.0)
Michigan 5,642 22.4 0.8 (20.9–23.9)
Minnesota 4,247 18.3 0.8 (16.8–19.8)
Mississippi 6,022 25.1 0.8 (23.5–26.7)
Missouri 5,383 23.2 1.0 (21.3–25.1)
Montana 6,029 18.9 0.7 (17.5–20.3)
Nebraska 7,947 18.7 0.7 (17.4–20.0)
Nevada 3,575 22.2 1.1 (20.0–24.4)
New Hampshire 6,013 18.7 0.7 (17.4–20.0)
New Jersey 13,378 18.0 0.5 (17.0–19.0)
New Mexico 6,560 20.1 0.7 (18.7–21.5)
New York 5,901 18.2 0.7 (16.9–19.5)
North Carolina 15,569 22.1 0.5 (21.1–23.1)
North Dakota 4,764 19.5 0.8 (17.9–21.1)
Ohio 5,799 22.4 1.2 (20.1–24.7)
Oklahoma 7,002 25.1 0.7 (23.7–26.5)
Oregon 4,842 18.5 0.7 (17.0–20.0)
Pennsylvania 13,210 21.5 0.7 (20.1–22.9)
Rhode Island 4,493 19.2 0.9 (17.5–20.9)
South Carolina 8,994 22.3 0.6 (21.1–23.5)
South Dakota 6,633 20.3 0.7 (18.9–21.7)
Tennessee 4,408 22.6 1.0 (20.7–24.5)
Texas 6,824 17.9 0.9 (16.2–19.6)
Utah 5,193 9.8 0.6 (8.7–10.9)
Vermont 6,979 18.0 0.6 (16.8–19.2)
Virginia 5,410 19.3 0.8 (17.7–20.9)
Washington 23,627 17.1 0.4 (16.4–17.8)
West Virginia 3,790 25.7 0.9 (23.9–27.5)
Wisconsin 4,817 20.8 0.8 (19.2–22.4)
Wyoming 4,978 21.6 0.8 (20.1–23.1)
Puerto Rico 4,679 12.5 0.7 (11.2–13.8)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,216 8.9 0.6 (7.7–10.1)
Median 20.0
Range 8.9–28.5
* Smoked every day or some days during the time of the survey.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 38

TABLE 38. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who currently
smoke,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States,
2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 730 19.8 2.4 (15.2–24.4)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,817 19.5 1.3 (17.0–22.0)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 812 21.5 2.9 (15.7–27.3)
Asheville, North Carolina 534 21.4 2.4 (16.7–26.1)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,097 17.2 1.0 (15.3–19.1)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 537 19.4 2.8 (14.0–24.8)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 920 21.2 1.8 (17.7–24.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 535 19.2 2.2 (14.8–23.6)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,189 19.2 1.0 (17.3–21.1)
Barre, Vermont 719 19.3 2.0 (15.4–23.2)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,204 23.7 1.8 (20.2–27.2)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 1,732 10.5 1.0 (8.5–12.5)
Billings, Montana 504 18.2 2.2 (13.9–22.5)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 895 22.9 1.9 (19.3–26.5)
Bismarck, North Dakota 575 19.6 2.0 (15.7–23.5)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,320 17.7 1.3 (15.1–20.3)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 2,341 17.5 1.3 (14.9–20.1)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 905 18.6 1.7 (15.3–21.9)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,451 14.5 1.1 (12.4–16.6)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,042 15.4 1.0 (13.5–17.3)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 2,342 12.7 1.1 (10.6–14.8)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 1,773 20.7 1.4 (18.0–23.4)
Casper, Wyoming 609 31.2 2.2 (26.9–35.5)
Charleston, West Virginia 684 22.9 1.9 (19.1–26.7)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,048 21.3 1.7 (18.0–24.6)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,294 19.3 1.2 (16.9–21.7)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 716 19.5 1.8 (15.9–23.1)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,733 19.1 0.9 (17.3–20.9)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 986 25.6 3.0 (19.7–31.5)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 992 19.5 2.5 (14.7–24.3)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 787 19.1 1.8 (15.6–22.6)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,030 17.9 1.6 (14.8–21.0)
Concord, New Hampshire 638 14.8 1.8 (11.3–18.3)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 547 11.5 1.9 (7.8–15.2)
Dayton, Ohio 807 20.8 2.6 (15.7–25.9)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,835 18.1 0.9 (16.2–20.0)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 958 21.7 1.7 (18.4–25.0)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 832 26.3 2.1 (22.1–30.5)
Dover, Delaware 1,374 24.0 1.6 (20.9–27.1)
Durham, North Carolina 1,023 16.0 1.6 (12.9–19.1)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 2,955 16.4 1.0 (14.5–18.3)
El Paso, Texas 536 12.7 1.8 (9.1–16.3)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 1,769 15.5 1.7 (12.1–18.9)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 533 16.9 1.9 (13.1–20.7)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 720 23.3 3.4 (16.7–29.9)
Farmington, New Mexico 539 24.7 2.6 (19.6–29.8)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 565 28.2 2.6 (23.1–33.3)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 757 23.1 2.3 (18.7–27.5)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 501 19.9 2.8 (14.5–25.3)
Great Falls, Montana 518 22.1 2.2 (17.8–26.4)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 942 21.8 1.9 (18.0–25.6)
Greenville, South Carolina 821 21.7 2.0 (17.8–25.6)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 618 28.3 3.0 (22.5–34.1)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,684 16.0 1.0 (14.1–17.9)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 652 27.2 2.7 (21.9–32.5)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,402 19.7 1.4 (16.9–22.5)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 700 21.6 2.4 (16.8–26.4)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,997 17.0 0.9 (15.3–18.7)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 549 14.4 2.4 (9.8–19.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 504 24.7 3.9 (17.0–32.4)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,094 22.5 1.2 (20.2–24.8)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,035 22.1 1.7 (18.8–25.4)
Jacksonville, Florida 696 22.1 2.2 (17.7–26.5)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,474 18.7 1.5 (15.8–21.6)
Kalispell, Montana 503 17.0 2.0 (13.0–21.0)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,285 18.8 1.0 (16.9–20.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 652 18.8 1.9 (15.1–22.5)
Keene, New Hampshire 499 21.6 2.6 (16.6–26.6)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 676 16.3 2.0 (12.5–20.1)

TABLE 38. (continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who
currently smoke, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 537 16.7 2.0 (12.7–20.7)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,222 22.4 1.5 (19.5–25.3)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,579 19.3 1.6 (16.1–22.5)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 607 23.5 2.3 (19.1–27.9)
Lincoln, Nebraska 772 18.2 1.7 (14.8–21.6)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,233 19.5 1.5 (16.5–22.5)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 767 16.2 1.7 (12.8–19.6)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 921 27.4 2.0 (23.5–31.3)
Lubbock, Texas 573 22.2 2.4 (17.6–26.8)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,443 17.8 1.2 (15.4–20.2)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 840 22.0 2.3 (17.6–26.4)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,160 15.7 1.1 (13.5–17.9)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,362 19.1 1.9 (15.5–22.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,467 16.8 1.0 (14.9–18.7)
Missoula, Montana 508 16.1 2.3 (11.6–20.6)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 702 30.3 2.6 (25.3–35.3)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 632 21.4 2.1 (17.3–25.5)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 690 12.8 1.6 (9.6–16.0)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 3,342 16.5 1.0 (14.6–18.4)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,051 18.7 1.3 (16.2–21.2)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,469 22.1 1.5 (19.2–25.0)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 4,729 15.6 0.9 (13.9–17.3)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 597 22.2 2.3 (17.8–26.6)
Ocean City, New Jersey 550 23.0 2.7 (17.7–28.3)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 842 9.5 1.3 (7.0–12.0)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,175 23.9 1.2 (21.6–26.2)
Olympia, Washington 1,542 20.9 1.4 (18.2–23.6)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,747 20.4 1.2 (18.1–22.7)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 807 21.3 1.8 (17.7–24.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 2,622 20.0 1.5 (17.1–22.9)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,311 18.5 1.8 (15.1–21.9)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,652 22.2 1.6 (19.0–25.4)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,281 18.5 1.5 (15.5–21.5)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,787 16.9 0.9 (15.1–18.7)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,712 20.2 0.8 (18.7–21.7)
Provo-Orem, Utah 577 5.9 1.2 (3.5–8.3)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,198 14.9 1.7 (11.6–18.2)
Rapid City, South Dakota 969 20.7 1.7 (17.4–24.0)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,243 19.8 1.4 (17.1–22.5)
Richmond, Virginia 860 21.2 2.2 (16.9–25.5)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 704 13.9 1.6 (10.8–17.0)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 1,656 19.7 1.3 (17.1–22.3)
Rutland, Vermont 692 21.7 1.9 (18.0–25.4)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,606 21.4 1.8 (17.9–24.9)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,198 11.1 0.9 (9.3–12.9)
San Antonio, Texas 540 17.2 2.4 (12.4–22.0)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 547 9.7 1.5 (6.8–12.6)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 750 13.8 2.0 (9.9–17.7)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 556 18.3 2.2 (14.0–22.6)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 571 19.5 2.4 (14.8–24.2)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,783 27.1 2.5 (22.2–32.0)
Seaford, Delaware 1,313 24.9 1.6 (21.7–28.1)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 4,783 13.8 0.7 (12.5–15.1)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 641 22.4 2.2 (18.2–26.6)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 902 20.2 1.7 (16.9–23.5)
Spokane, Washington 1,186 25.2 2.0 (21.4–29.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,633 18.2 1.5 (15.3–21.1)
Tacoma, Washingtonķ 1,606 20.5 1.3 (17.9–23.1)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,089 24.1 1.8 (20.6–27.6)
Toledo, Ohio 787 18.8 2.9 (13.1–24.5)
Topeka, Kansas 755 22.8 1.9 (19.2–26.4)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 509 13.6 2.0 (9.7–17.5)
Tucson, Arizona 786 15.7 1.7 (12.3–19.1)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,879 24.5 1.4 (21.7–27.3)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,124 19.1 1.8 (15.5–22.7)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 1,215 18.0 1.4 (15.3–20.7)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 6,227 17.3 1.5 (14.3–20.3)

TABLE 38. (continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who
currently smoke, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,038 15.4 1.6 (12.2–18.6)
Wichita, Kansas 1,659 20.1 1.3 (17.5–22.7)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 1,813 21.2 1.4 (18.5–23.9)
Wilmington, North Carolina 673 21.9 2.3 (17.5–26.3)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 611 24.0 2.1 (19.8–28.2)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,739 22.2 1.6 (19.0–25.4)
Yakima, Washington 744 16.6 2.0 (12.7–20.5)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 924 18.7 3.1 (12.6–24.8)
Yuma, Arizona 512 13.3 1.9 (9.5–17.1)
Median 19.5
Range 5.9–31.2
* Smoked every day or some days during the time of the survey.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 39

TABLE 39. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who currently
smoke,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§
Jefferson County, Alabama 540 21.5 2.3 (17.0–26.0)
Maricopa County, Arizona 876 18.2 1.8 (14.6–21.8)
Pima County, Arizona 786 15.7 1.7 (12.3–19.1)
Pinal County, Arizona 435 21.9 3.2 (15.7–28.1)
Yuma County, Arizona 512 13.3 1.9 (9.5–17.1)
Benton County, Arkansas 378 22.9 2.7 (17.7–28.1)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 701 18.4 1.8 (14.9–21.9)
Washington County, Arkansas 324 21.0 2.9 (15.3–26.7)
Alameda County, California 275 14.1 2.8 (8.6–19.6)
Los Angeles County, California 767 16.2 1.7 (12.8–19.6)
Riverside County, California 357 14.3 2.3 (9.8–18.8)
San Bernardino County, California 347 14.0 2.1 (9.8–18.2)
San Diego County, California 547 9.7 1.5 (6.8–12.6)
Adams County, Colorado 432 25.4 2.7 (20.1–30.7)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 632 17.3 2.0 (13.3–21.3)
Denver County, Colorado 589 20.6 2.1 (16.5–24.7)
Douglas County, Colorado 296 6.3 1.6 (3.1–9.5)
El Paso County, Colorado 757 19.0 1.8 (15.4–22.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 731 17.1 1.7 (13.7–20.5)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,451 14.5 1.1 (12.4–16.6)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,955 16.3 1.1 (14.1–18.5)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 363 16.0 2.5 (11.1–20.9)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,051 18.7 1.3 (16.2–21.2)
New London County, Connecticut 597 22.2 2.3 (17.8–26.6)
Tolland County, Connecticut 366 13.5 2.3 (8.9–18.1)
Kent County, Delaware 1,374 24.0 1.6 (20.9–27.1)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,307 20.1 1.5 (17.1–23.1)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,313 24.9 1.6 (21.7–28.1)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,992 17.8 0.9 (16.1–19.5)
Broward County, Florida 729 14.6 1.6 (11.5–17.7)
Duval County, Florida 298 22.4 3.1 (16.3–28.5)
Hillsborough County, Florida 480 20.1 2.4 (15.5–24.7)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 915 15.6 1.6 (12.5–18.7)
Orange County, Florida 432 20.1 2.5 (15.2–25.0)
Palm Beach County, Florida 516 16.5 2.4 (11.9–21.1)
Pinellas County, Florida 345 23.6 3.2 (17.2–30.0)
Clayton County, Georgia 377 23.7 3.7 (16.4–31.0)
Cobb County, Georgia 388 18.9 2.6 (13.8–24.0)
DeKalb County, Georgia 436 10.4 2.0 (6.5–14.3)
Fulton County, Georgia 423 14.6 2.2 (10.2–19.0)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 357 15.7 2.4 (11.0–20.4)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,402 19.7 1.4 (16.9–22.5)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,997 17.0 0.9 (15.3–18.7)
Kauai County, Hawaii 652 18.8 1.9 (15.1–22.5)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,474 18.7 1.5 (15.8–21.6)
Ada County, Idaho 655 15.4 1.8 (11.9–18.9)
Canyon County, Idaho 521 19.2 2.0 (15.3–23.1)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 257 23.5 2.9 (17.8–29.2)
Cook County, Illinois 1,687 18.8 1.3 (16.3–21.3)
DuPage County, Illinois 373 12.9 2.1 (8.8–17.0)
Lake County, Illinois 263 18.1 3.2 (11.8–24.4)
Lake County, Indiana 525 24.0 2.6 (19.0–29.0)
Marion County, Indiana 1,342 24.4 1.5 (21.5–27.3)
Polk County, Iowa 726 23.5 1.9 (19.8–27.2)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,442 14.8 1.3 (12.2–17.4)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,249 22.4 1.6 (19.3–25.5)
Shawnee County, Kansas 550 19.9 2.0 (16.0–23.8)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 345 27.4 3.3 (21.0–33.8)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 471 24.0 2.5 (19.0–29.0)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 412 22.7 2.8 (17.3–28.1)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 686 21.0 2.3 (16.6–25.4)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 638 21.8 2.1 (17.7–25.9)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 276 20.7 3.5 (13.9–27.5)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 397 26.0 2.8 (20.5–31.5)
Cumberland County, Maine 665 15.9 1.9 (12.2–19.6)
York County, Maine 466 21.3 2.5 (16.5–26.1)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 583 18.5 2.2 (14.3–22.7)
Baltimore County, Maryland 943 20.3 1.7 (16.9–23.7)
Carroll County, Maryland 255 13.0 2.5 (8.2–17.8)

TABLE 39. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who
currently smoke, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 321 24.4 2.9 (18.6–30.2)
Charles County, Maryland 306 17.8 2.7 (12.6–23.0)
Frederick County, Maryland 586 19.1 2.4 (14.4–23.8)
Harford County, Maryland 289 17.7 2.7 (12.5–22.9)
Howard County, Maryland 321 12.6 2.2 (8.4–16.8)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,146 8.8 1.1 (6.6–11.0)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 660 17.5 2.0 (13.6–21.4)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 273 20.9 3.1 (14.8–27.0)
Washington County, Maryland 406 23.4 2.7 (18.0–28.8)
Baltimore city, Maryland 525 25.2 2.4 (20.5–29.9)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,219 22.6 1.6 (19.6–25.6)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,769 15.3 1.8 (11.8–18.8)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,322 19.5 1.7 (16.1–22.9)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,342 12.9 1.1 (10.7–15.1)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 631 15.5 2.1 (11.3–19.7)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 520 20.9 2.3 (16.3–25.5)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,190 16.1 1.6 (12.9–19.3)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,739 22.2 1.6 (19.0–25.4)
Macomb County, Michigan 380 20.1 2.5 (15.2–25.0)
Oakland County, Michigan 593 14.6 1.9 (10.9–18.3)
Wayne County, Michigan 832 26.3 2.1 (22.1–30.5)
Dakota County, Minnesota 294 14.2 2.4 (9.4–19.0)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 884 16.5 1.5 (13.5–19.5)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 413 14.4 2.0 (10.5–18.3)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 258 25.2 3.8 (17.8–32.6)
Hinds County, Mississippi 461 20.2 2.3 (15.7–24.7)
Rankin County, Mississippi 272 23.2 3.2 (17.0–29.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 523 18.6 2.0 (14.6–22.6)
St. Louis County, Missouri 351 13.6 2.7 (8.2–19.0)
St. Louis city, Missouri 605 25.2 2.8 (19.7–30.7)
Cascade County, Montana 518 22.1 2.2 (17.8–26.4)
Flathead County, Montana 503 17.0 2.0 (13.0–21.0)
Missoula County, Montana 508 16.1 2.3 (11.6–20.6)
Yellowstone County, Montana 460 18.3 2.3 (13.8–22.8)
Douglas County, Nebraska 984 20.2 1.6 (17.1–23.3)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 718 18.0 1.8 (14.5–21.5)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 292 18.9 2.7 (13.6–24.2)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 557 19.1 2.4 (14.4–23.8)
Clark County, Nevada 1,222 22.4 1.5 (19.5–25.3)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,226 19.9 1.4 (17.1–22.7)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 499 21.6 2.6 (16.6–26.6)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 465 18.0 2.5 (13.2–22.8)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,443 17.8 1.2 (15.4–20.2)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 638 14.8 1.8 (11.3–18.3)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,024 19.1 1.5 (16.2–22.0)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 632 20.5 2.1 (16.4–24.6)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 537 19.4 2.8 (14.0–24.8)
Bergen County, New Jersey 962 16.5 1.7 (13.2–19.8)
Burlington County, New Jersey 549 15.9 2.0 (11.9–19.9)
Camden County, New Jersey 642 22.4 2.5 (17.5–27.3)
Cape May County, New Jersey 550 23.0 2.7 (17.7–28.3)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,042 16.1 1.6 (13.0–19.2)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 582 23.9 2.3 (19.4–28.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 843 20.1 2.0 (16.3–23.9)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 521 14.8 2.1 (10.6–19.0)
Mercer County, New Jersey 509 13.6 2.0 (9.7–17.5)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 827 14.2 1.6 (11.0–17.4)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 758 18.6 2.3 (14.1–23.1)
Morris County, New Jersey 701 11.5 1.5 (8.5–14.5)
Ocean County, New Jersey 792 22.0 1.9 (18.2–25.8)
Passaic County, New Jersey 892 17.4 2.3 (12.8–22.0)
Somerset County, New Jersey 578 11.2 1.7 (7.9–14.5)
Sussex County, New Jersey 558 24.8 2.7 (19.4–30.2)
Union County, New Jersey 491 20.0 2.5 (15.1–24.9)
Warren County, New Jersey 512 18.9 2.4 (14.1–23.7)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,158 19.0 1.5 (16.1–21.9)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 537 16.7 2.0 (12.7–20.7)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 368 22.6 3.0 (16.7–28.5)
San Juan County, New Mexico 539 24.7 2.6 (19.6–29.8)

TABLE 39. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who
currently smoke, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 556 18.3 2.2 (14.0–22.6)
Kings County, New York 465 15.4 2.2 (11.2–19.6)
Nassau County, New York 345 10.2 2.1 (6.0–14.4)
New York County, New York 467 15.4 2.3 (11.0–19.8)
Queens County, New York 418 14.3 2.1 (10.3–18.3)
Suffolk County, New York 345 16.0 2.6 (11.0–21.0)
Westchester County, New York 259 10.5 2.3 (5.9–15.1)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 358 18.7 2.6 (13.6–23.8)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 385 16.5 2.3 (12.0–21.0)
Catawba County, North Carolina 402 22.4 2.9 (16.8–28.0)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 442 29.2 2.9 (23.5–34.9)
Durham County, North Carolina 398 17.1 2.4 (12.4–21.8)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 418 22.6 2.5 (17.6–27.6)
Gaston County, North Carolina 390 24.0 2.8 (18.4–29.6)
Guilford County, North Carolina 444 21.2 2.8 (15.7–26.7)
Johnston County, North Carolina 447 22.5 2.7 (17.2–27.8)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 832 17.6 1.8 (14.1–21.1)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 390 18.3 2.6 (13.2–23.4)
Orange County, North Carolina 364 12.4 2.8 (6.9–17.9)
Randolph County, North Carolina 386 21.9 2.4 (17.1–26.7)
Union County, North Carolina 391 17.9 2.8 (12.5–23.3)
Wake County, North Carolina 652 13.3 2.1 (9.2–17.4)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 409 15.5 2.1 (11.3–19.7)
Cass County, North Dakota 672 20.2 2.1 (16.0–24.4)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 418 17.6 3.1 (11.6–23.6)
Hamilton County, Ohio 377 NAķ NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 489 20.4 2.6 (15.2–25.6)
Lucas County, Ohio 725 19.9 2.1 (15.9–23.9)
Mahoning County, Ohio 832 23.9 2.4 (19.1–28.7)
Montgomery County, Ohio 753 19.0 2.0 (15.0–23.0)
Summit County, Ohio 694 22.8 2.3 (18.3–27.3)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 377 21.7 2.5 (16.8–26.6)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,280 24.8 1.6 (21.8–27.8)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,348 23.1 1.6 (20.0–26.2)
Clackamas County, Oregon 448 20.5 2.7 (15.3–25.7)
Lane County, Oregon 533 16.9 1.9 (13.1–20.7)
Multnomah County, Oregon 774 16.5 1.6 (13.4–19.6)
Washington County, Oregon 505 13.1 2.0 (9.3–16.9)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 513 22.0 2.3 (17.5–26.5)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,500 22.9 1.5 (20.0–25.8)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,627 26.4 1.7 (23.0–29.8)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 307 15.9 2.6 (10.9–20.9)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,755 25.9 2.7 (20.7–31.1)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 279 18.1 3.6 (11.1–25.1)
Kent County, Rhode Island 652 20.5 2.0 (16.6–24.4)
Newport County, Rhode Island 364 13.3 2.1 (9.2–17.4)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,767 18.8 1.0 (16.7–20.9)
Washington County, Rhode Island 517 20.9 2.7 (15.7–26.1)
Aiken County, South Carolina 535 20.6 2.2 (16.2–25.0)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 631 19.1 2.5 (14.2–24.0)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 260 23.4 3.4 (16.7–30.1)
Charleston County, South Carolina 575 20.3 2.4 (15.6–25.0)
Greenville County, South Carolina 514 19.5 2.1 (15.3–23.7)
Horry County, South Carolina 702 30.3 2.6 (25.3–35.3)
Lexington County, South Carolina 322 20.4 2.8 (14.8–26.0)
Richland County, South Carolina 442 16.5 2.5 (11.6–21.4)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 662 22.9 2.2 (18.6–27.2)
Pennington County, South Dakota 757 21.5 1.9 (17.7–25.3)
Davidson County, Tennessee 277 19.1 2.9 (13.4–24.8)
Shelby County, Tennessee 294 19.4 3.2 (13.1–25.7)
Bexar County, Texas 404 16.4 2.6 (11.3–21.5)
Dallas County, Texas 394 12.5 2.2 (8.2–16.8)
El Paso County, Texas 536 12.7 1.8 (9.1–16.3)
Harris County, Texas 383 16.0 3.2 (9.7–22.3)
Lubbock County, Texas 558 22.0 2.4 (17.3–26.7)
Tarrant County, Texas 448 21.7 3.1 (15.5–27.9)
Travis County, Texas 317 19.6 2.9 (13.9–25.3)
Davis County, Utah 414 5.9 1.4 (3.1–8.7)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,677 10.8 1.0 (8.9–12.7)

TABLE 39. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever smoking at least 100 cigarettes and who
currently smoke, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 251 6.9 1.8 (3.4–10.4)
Tooele County, Utah 270 17.5 2.9 (11.8–23.2)
Utah County, Utah 548 5.7 1.2 (3.3–8.1)
Weber County, Utah 414 14.9 2.2 (10.6–19.2)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,487 13.7 1.1 (11.5–15.9)
Franklin County, Vermont 459 20.6 2.2 (16.4–24.8)
Orange County, Vermont 378 20.7 2.8 (15.1–26.3)
Rutland County, Vermont 692 21.7 1.9 (18.0–25.4)
Washington County, Vermont 719 19.3 2.0 (15.4–23.2)
Windsor County, Vermont 736 15.9 1.6 (12.8–19.0)
Asotin County, Washington 350 22.5 2.8 (17.1–27.9)
Benton County, Washington 364 17.0 2.4 (12.2–21.8)
Chelan County, Washington 538 13.8 2.2 (9.4–18.2)
Clark County, Washington 1,551 17.6 1.2 (15.2–20.0)
Douglas County, Washington 500 16.7 2.2 (12.5–20.9)
Franklin County, Washington 312 15.5 2.8 (10.1–20.9)
King County, Washington 3,242 12.2 0.7 (10.7–13.7)
Kitsap County, Washington 905 18.6 1.7 (15.3–21.9)
Pierce County, Washington 1,606 20.8 1.4 (18.1–23.5)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,541 17.8 1.2 (15.4–20.2)
Spokane County, Washington 1,186 25.2 2.0 (21.4–29.0)
Thurston County, Washington 1,542 20.9 1.4 (18.2–23.6)
Yakima County, Washington 744 16.6 2.0 (12.7–20.5)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 446 21.5 2.4 (16.9–26.1)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 984 20.6 2.1 (16.4–24.8)
Laramie County, Wyoming 716 19.5 1.8 (15.9–23.1)
Natrona County, Wyoming 609 31.2 2.2 (26.9–35.5)
Median 18.9
Range 5.7–31.2
* Smoked every day or some days during the time of the survey.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 40

TABLE 40. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,* by state/
territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Alabama 3,206 11.2 0.8 (9.6–12.8)
Alaska 2,048 17.0 1.2 (14.7–19.3)
Arizona 4,690 15.2 1.2 (12.9–17.5)
Arkansas 5,514 12.4 0.7 (11.1–13.7)
California 5,479 15.4 0.7 (14.0–16.8)
Colorado 5,936 16.4 0.7 (15.1–17.7)
Connecticut 8,309 14.5 0.6 (13.3–15.7)
Delaware 3,965 19.0 1.0 (17.0–21.0)
District of Columbia 3,899 15.9 0.8 (14.3–17.5)
Florida 10,492 13.8 0.6 (12.7–14.9)
Georgia 7,539 12.1 0.6 (10.9–13.3)
Hawaii 6,429 17.9 0.7 (16.5–19.3)
Idaho 5,258 14.8 0.7 (13.3–16.3)
Illinois 5,121 19.3 0.8 (17.7–20.9)
Indiana 6,427 16.0 0.7 (14.7–17.3)
Iowa 5,310 20.6 0.8 (19.1–22.1)
Kansas 8,202 15.4 0.6 (14.2–16.6)
Kentucky 5,781 8.6 0.7 (7.3–9.9)
Louisiana 6,888 13.3 0.6 (12.2–14.4)
Maine 3,956 16.1 0.8 (14.5–17.7)
Maryland 8,712 13.9 0.6 (12.7–15.1)
Massachusetts 12,350 17.7 0.6 (16.4–19.0)
Michigan 5,561 17.7 0.7 (16.3–19.1)
Minnesota 4,227 17.6 0.8 (16.0–19.2)
Mississippi 5,928 9.5 0.6 (8.4–10.6)
Missouri 5,306 16.5 1.0 (14.5–18.5)
Montana 5,908 16.0 0.7 (14.6–17.4)
Nebraska 7,834 18.1 0.7 (16.7–19.5)
Nevada 3,508 15.7 0.9 (13.8–17.6)
New Hampshire 5,882 15.2 0.7 (13.9–16.5)
New Jersey 13,068 14.3 0.5 (13.3–15.3)
New Mexico 6,447 13.2 0.6 (11.9–14.5)
New York 5,767 15.8 0.7 (14.4–17.2)
North Carolina 15,423 11.3 0.4 (10.5–12.1)
North Dakota 4,680 21.2 0.9 (19.4–23.0)
Ohio 5,714 16.3 1.2 (14.0–18.6)
Oklahoma 6,919 13.4 0.6 (12.2–14.6)
Oregon 4,730 14.1 0.7 (12.7–15.5)
Pennsylvania 12,964 16.6 0.7 (15.2–18.0)
Rhode Island 4,425 17.6 0.9 (15.8–19.4)
South Carolina 8,847 13.5 0.5 (12.4–14.6)
South Dakota 6,537 18.2 0.8 (16.7–19.7)
Tennessee 4,315 8.6 0.8 (7.0–10.2)
Texas 6,716 14.7 0.9 (13.0–16.4)
Utah 5,146 9.3 0.6 (8.1–10.5)
Vermont 6,895 16.8 0.7 (15.5–18.1)
Virginia 5,330 13.5 0.8 (12.0–15.0)
Washington 23,225 14.2 0.4 (13.4–15.0)
West Virginia 3,759 11.2 0.7 (9.8–12.6)
Wisconsin 4,684 24.3 0.9 (22.6–26.0)
Wyoming 4,908 16.7 0.7 (15.3–18.1)
Puerto Rico 4,549 13.8 0.7 (12.4–15.2)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,138 12.3 0.7 (10.9–13.7)
Median 15.4
Range 8.6–24.3
* For males, having at least five drinks on at least one occasion; for females: having at least four drinks on at least one occasion.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 41

TABLE 41. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,* by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 709 15.9 2.7 (10.5–21.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,778 13.0 1.2 (10.7–15.3)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 785 20.9 4.0 (13.0–28.8)
Asheville, North Carolina 523 11.1 1.9 (7.4–14.8)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,020 12.9 1.0 (11.0–14.8)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 521 15.8 3.2 (9.5–22.1)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 893 13.0 1.6 (9.8–16.2)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 521 20.3 2.4 (15.6–25.0)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,106 15.4 0.9 (13.6–17.2)
Barre, Vermont 704 16.5 2.0 (12.7–20.3)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,144 14.4 1.4 (11.8–17.0)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 1,692 12.8 1.2 (10.4–15.2)
Billings, Montana 489 13.5 1.9 (9.9–17.1)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 872 12.6 1.7 (9.3–15.9)
Bismarck, North Dakota 550 18.1 1.9 (14.3–21.9)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,296 15.7 1.4 (13.0–18.4)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 2,272 18.6 1.4 (15.8–21.4)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 890 16.4 1.7 (13.0–19.8)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,372 14.5 1.3 (12.0–17.0)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,002 17.0 1.2 (14.7–19.3)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 2,250 14.6 1.3 (12.1–17.1)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 1,722 16.8 1.3 (14.2–19.4)
Casper, Wyoming 593 16.2 1.9 (12.5–19.9)
Charleston, West Virginia 678 10.6 1.6 (7.4–13.8)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,020 19.1 1.7 (15.8–22.4)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,254 14.6 1.2 (12.3–16.9)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 702 15.5 1.9 (11.8–19.2)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,659 19.5 1.0 (17.6–21.4)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 942 16.0 2.5 (11.2–20.8)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 973 15.5 2.3 (11.0–20.0)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 764 13.9 1.6 (10.7–17.1)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,013 16.2 1.6 (13.1–19.3)
Concord, New Hampshire 627 12.0 1.7 (8.6–15.4)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 530 15.9 2.7 (10.7–21.1)
Dayton, Ohio 786 12.3 1.9 (8.6–16.0)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,733 17.4 1.0 (15.5–19.3)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 938 17.9 1.5 (14.9–20.9)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 820 15.2 1.8 (11.8–18.6)
Dover, Delaware 1,365 16.5 1.4 (13.7–19.3)
Durham, North Carolina 1,006 11.5 1.5 (8.5–14.5)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 2,843 12.5 0.9 (10.6–14.4)
El Paso, Texas 528 12.3 1.9 (8.6–16.0)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 1,713 16.5 1.7 (13.2–19.8)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 519 14.9 2.1 (10.8–19.0)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 705 24.8 3.2 (18.5–31.1)
Farmington, New Mexico 529 9.7 1.7 (6.4–13.0)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 553 13.3 2.1 (9.1–17.5)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 753 13.9 1.7 (10.5–17.3)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 488 14.3 2.5 (9.3–19.3)
Great Falls, Montana 497 14.6 1.9 (10.9–18.3)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 929 12.4 1.7 (9.0–15.8)
Greenville, South Carolina 801 9.7 1.5 (6.8–12.6)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 610 17.2 2.8 (11.8–22.6)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,611 15.3 1.0 (13.3–17.3)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 643 10.9 2.1 (6.8–15.0)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,383 17.8 1.4 (15.0–20.6)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 685 21.2 2.5 (16.2–26.2)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,926 17.7 0.9 (15.8–19.6)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 535 13.7 2.6 (8.7–18.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 487 9.8 2.6 (4.8–14.8)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,055 14.9 1.1 (12.8–17.0)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,000 8.9 1.2 (6.5–11.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 680 16.5 2.2 (12.1–20.9)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,445 16.2 1.5 (13.3–19.1)
Kalispell, Montana 489 17.4 2.3 (12.9–21.9)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,243 14.8 1.0 (12.9–16.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 637 18.6 2.1 (14.4–22.8)
Keene, New Hampshire 480 12.1 2.4 (7.4–16.8)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 658 10.4 1.6 (7.3–13.5)

TABLE 41. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,
by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 526 16.3 2.0 (12.4–20.2)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,187 14.6 1.3 (12.1–17.1)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,547 17.5 1.7 (14.2–20.8)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 597 20.7 2.4 (16.0–25.4)
Lincoln, Nebraska 760 21.1 2.1 (16.9–25.3)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,210 13.3 1.4 (10.5–16.1)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 732 13.0 1.6 (9.9–16.1)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 876 12.7 1.7 (9.4–16.0)
Lubbock, Texas 557 14.6 2.1 (10.5–18.7)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,386 16.4 1.3 (13.8–19.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 818 10.4 2.2 (6.1–14.7)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,100 12.6 1.0 (10.6–14.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,299 20.0 1.9 (16.3–23.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,442 16.8 1.0 (14.8–18.8)
Missoula, Montana 488 15.8 2.1 (11.8–19.8)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 681 18.5 2.1 (14.4–22.6)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 612 11.4 2.0 (7.4–15.4)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 675 15.3 1.8 (11.9–18.7)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 3,228 13.8 1.1 (11.7–15.9)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,993 13.8 1.2 (11.4–16.2)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,422 14.1 1.3 (11.6–16.6)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 4,562 14.1 0.9 (12.4–15.8)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 584 15.5 1.9 (11.8–19.2)
Ocean City, New Jersey 527 12.7 2.3 (8.2–17.2)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 840 9.8 1.5 (6.9–12.7)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,134 15.8 1.1 (13.6–18.0)
Olympia, Washington 1,502 14.1 1.3 (11.6–16.6)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,705 18.1 1.2 (15.7–20.5)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 796 13.6 1.7 (10.3–16.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 2,544 16.1 1.5 (13.1–19.1)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,275 16.2 1.8 (12.8–19.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,564 15.7 1.4 (12.9–18.5)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,254 18.3 1.6 (15.3–21.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,664 14.5 1.0 (12.6–16.4)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,543 17.9 0.9 (16.2–19.6)
Provo-Orem, Utah 575 5.5 1.3 (2.9–8.1)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,188 11.4 1.3 (8.9–13.9)
Rapid City, South Dakota 948 16.8 1.6 (13.7–19.9)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,212 18.1 1.4 (15.4–20.8)
Richmond, Virginia 846 14.9 1.7 (11.5–18.3)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 672 12.7 1.7 (9.4–16.0)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 1,599 15.7 1.3 (13.1–18.3)
Rutland, Vermont 672 17.4 2.0 (13.4–21.4)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,570 19.3 2.0 (15.4–23.2)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,168 11.7 1.0 (9.7–13.7)
San Antonio, Texas 524 19.9 2.7 (14.6–25.2)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 526 15.6 2.1 (11.5–19.7)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 722 19.9 2.3 (15.5–24.3)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 543 14.2 2.0 (10.2–18.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 562 12.0 1.9 (8.2–15.8)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,707 21.6 2.7 (16.3–26.9)
Seaford, Delaware 1,298 17.5 1.6 (14.4–20.6)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 4,675 13.9 0.7 (12.5–15.3)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 611 9.5 1.5 (6.6–12.4)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 874 17.3 1.7 (13.9–20.7)
Spokane, Washington 1,154 16.5 1.6 (13.4–19.6)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,578 19.4 2.1 (15.4–23.4)
Tacoma, Washingtonķ 1,573 15.0 1.3 (12.5–17.5)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,066 15.7 1.7 (12.4–19.0)
Toledo, Ohio 766 23.6 4.4 (15.1–32.1)
Topeka, Kansas 739 12.0 1.5 (9.0–15.0)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 486 12.7 2.1 (8.6–16.8)
Tucson, Arizona 760 13.8 1.9 (10.1–17.5)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,843 13.6 1.2 (11.3–15.9)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,096 16.2 1.6 (13.0–19.4)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 1,188 17.6 1.4 (14.8–20.4)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 6,020 11.3 1.0 (9.3–13.3)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,012 11.5 1.3 (9.0–14.0)

TABLE 41. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,
by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,634 12.5 1.3 (9.9–15.1)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 1,776 18.7 1.3 (16.2–21.2)
Wilmington, North Carolina 649 13.6 2.2 (9.4–17.8)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 600 8.9 1.5 (5.9–11.9)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,683 17.8 1.6 (14.7–20.9)
Yakima, Washington 727 10.8 1.4 (8.0–13.6)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 899 14.0 2.8 (8.5–19.5)
Yuma, Arizona 495 14.0 2.1 (9.8–18.2)
Median 15.0
Range 5.5–24.8
* For males, having at least five drinks on at least one occasion; for females: having at least four drinks on at least one occasion.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 42

TABLE 42. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,* by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Jefferson County, Alabama 526 13.8 2.2 (9.5–18.1)
Maricopa County, Arizona 850 15.9 1.8 (12.3–19.5)
Pima County, Arizona 760 13.8 1.9 (10.1–17.5)
Pinal County, Arizona 425 17.9 3.0 (12.1–23.7)
Yuma County, Arizona 495 14.0 2.1 (9.8–18.2)
Benton County, Arkansas 378 14.3 2.4 (9.6–19.0)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 689 13.9 1.8 (10.4–17.4)
Washington County, Arkansas 320 16.6 2.9 (11.0–22.2)
Alameda County, California 269 18.9 3.3 (12.4–25.4)
Los Angeles County, California 732 13.0 1.6 (9.9–16.1)
Riverside County, California 342 13.2 2.6 (8.1–18.3)
San Bernardino County, California 330 12.3 2.2 (8.1–16.5)
San Diego County, California 526 15.6 2.1 (11.5–19.7)
Adams County, Colorado 416 17.5 2.4 (12.7–22.3)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 605 17.5 2.0 (13.6–21.4)
Denver County, Colorado 566 20.2 2.3 (15.7–24.7)
Douglas County, Colorado 284 14.7 2.4 (9.9–19.5)
El Paso County, Colorado 735 14.4 1.7 (11.1–17.7)
Jefferson County, Colorado 709 16.2 1.8 (12.7–19.7)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,372 14.5 1.3 (12.0–17.0)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,910 15.0 1.2 (12.7–17.3)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 346 16.5 2.6 (11.4–21.6)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,993 13.8 1.2 (11.4–16.2)
New London County, Connecticut 584 15.5 1.9 (11.8–19.2)
Tolland County, Connecticut 355 13.1 2.4 (8.4–17.8)
Kent County, Delaware 1,365 16.5 1.4 (13.7–19.3)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,288 20.3 1.5 (17.4–23.2)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,298 17.5 1.6 (14.4–20.6)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,854 15.8 0.8 (14.2–17.4)
Broward County, Florida 707 11.3 1.6 (8.2–14.4)
Duval County, Florida 294 16.4 3.0 (10.6–22.2)
Hillsborough County, Florida 469 15.7 2.4 (11.1–20.3)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 898 13.6 1.5 (10.7–16.5)
Orange County, Florida 425 12.7 2.2 (8.4–17.0)
Palm Beach County, Florida 495 11.7 2.0 (7.8–15.6)
Pinellas County, Florida 340 16.2 3.1 (10.1–22.3)
Clayton County, Georgia 359 9.3 2.2 (4.9–13.7)
Cobb County, Georgia 374 15.7 2.4 (11.0–20.4)
DeKalb County, Georgia 423 10.3 2.0 (6.3–14.3)
Fulton County, Georgia 412 15.3 2.3 (10.8–19.8)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 348 9.9 2.0 (5.9–13.9)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,383 17.8 1.4 (15.0–20.6)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,926 17.7 0.9 (15.8–19.6)
Kauai County, Hawaii 637 18.6 2.1 (14.4–22.8)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,445 16.2 1.5 (13.3–19.1)
Ada County, Idaho 641 18.9 2.1 (14.7–23.1)
Canyon County, Idaho 516 11.5 1.7 (8.2–14.8)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 253 20.2 3.0 (14.3–26.1)
Cook County, Illinois 1,666 19.4 1.4 (16.7–22.1)
DuPage County, Illinois 367 16.5 2.4 (11.7–21.3)
Lake County, Illinois 255 17.3 2.9 (11.7–22.9)
Lake County, Indiana 505 18.8 2.7 (13.6–24.0)
Marion County, Indiana 1,313 15.7 1.4 (13.0–18.4)
Polk County, Iowa 714 18.9 1.8 (15.5–22.3)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,425 16.3 1.4 (13.6–19.0)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,231 13.8 1.5 (10.8–16.8)
Shawnee County, Kansas 539 11.6 1.8 (8.2–15.0)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 338 18.4 2.9 (12.7–24.1)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 438 7.8 1.7 (4.5–11.1)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 397 10.6 2.0 (6.6–14.6)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 651 12.7 1.6 (9.5–15.9)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 621 15.9 2.1 (11.8–20.0)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 265 15.4 2.7 (10.0–20.8)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 383 19.3 3.4 (12.6–26.0)
Cumberland County, Maine 654 16.4 1.9 (12.7–20.1)
York County, Maine 454 19.8 2.5 (14.9–24.7)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 573 18.6 2.2 (14.4–22.8)
Baltimore County, Maryland 916 15.6 1.7 (12.3–18.9)
Carroll County, Maryland 241 12.4 2.7 (7.0–17.8)

TABLE 42. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,
by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 310 16.7 2.8 (11.3–22.1)
Charles County, Maryland 300 13.5 2.3 (8.9–18.1)
Frederick County, Maryland 567 18.2 2.5 (13.3–23.1)
Harford County, Maryland 286 14.3 2.5 (9.3–19.3)
Howard County, Maryland 316 14.5 2.4 (9.8–19.2)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,125 11.8 1.4 (9.1–14.5)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 637 7.7 1.5 (4.7–10.7)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 264 18.9 3.1 (12.8–25.0)
Washington County, Maryland 400 16.3 2.8 (10.8–21.8)
Baltimore city, Maryland 510 16.5 2.2 (12.2–20.8)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,143 18.7 1.8 (15.1–22.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,713 17.1 1.8 (13.5–20.7)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,272 18.7 2.4 (14.0–23.4)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,250 14.7 1.3 (12.1–17.3)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 614 15.2 2.2 (10.9–19.5)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 500 22.0 2.4 (17.2–26.8)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,158 17.9 1.9 (14.1–21.7)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,683 17.8 1.6 (14.7–20.9)
Macomb County, Michigan 369 13.9 2.3 (9.4–18.4)
Oakland County, Michigan 580 18.2 2.2 (14.0–22.4)
Wayne County, Michigan 820 15.2 1.8 (11.8–18.6)
Dakota County, Minnesota 291 18.4 3.0 (12.6–24.2)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 874 15.2 1.6 (12.1–18.3)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 412 14.8 2.2 (10.5–19.1)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 251 4.7 1.3 (2.2–7.2)
Hinds County, Mississippi 442 10.5 1.8 (7.0–14.0)
Rankin County, Mississippi 264 7.4 2.0 (3.4–11.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 515 14.9 2.2 (10.5–19.3)
St. Louis County, Missouri 344 19.7 3.5 (12.8–26.6)
St. Louis city, Missouri 588 24.9 4.2 (16.6–33.2)
Cascade County, Montana 497 14.6 1.9 (10.9–18.3)
Flathead County, Montana 489 17.4 2.3 (12.9–21.9)
Missoula County, Montana 488 15.8 2.1 (11.8–19.8)
Yellowstone County, Montana 445 12.2 1.9 (8.6–15.8)
Douglas County, Nebraska 957 18.0 1.6 (14.9–21.1)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 706 20.6 2.2 (16.3–24.9)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 289 17.9 2.6 (12.8–23.0)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 548 11.9 2.0 (8.1–15.7)
Clark County, Nevada 1,187 14.6 1.3 (12.1–17.1)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,195 18.0 1.4 (15.3–20.7)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 480 12.1 2.4 (7.4–16.8)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 458 16.9 2.7 (11.7–22.1)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,386 16.4 1.3 (13.8–19.0)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 627 12.0 1.7 (8.6–15.4)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 992 17.4 1.6 (14.3–20.5)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 607 11.6 1.7 (8.2–15.0)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 521 15.8 3.2 (9.5–22.1)
Bergen County, New Jersey 922 13.3 1.7 (10.0–16.6)
Burlington County, New Jersey 538 13.7 1.9 (9.9–17.5)
Camden County, New Jersey 626 17.4 2.4 (12.7–22.1)
Cape May County, New Jersey 527 12.7 2.3 (8.2–17.2)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,002 12.4 1.9 (8.7–16.1)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 558 20.1 2.4 (15.3–24.9)
Hudson County, New Jersey 811 14.7 1.8 (11.3–18.1)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 505 16.0 2.6 (11.0–21.0)
Mercer County, New Jersey 486 12.7 2.1 (8.6–16.8)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 794 10.6 1.5 (7.6–13.6)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 723 15.9 2.2 (11.6–20.2)
Morris County, New Jersey 673 14.2 1.9 (10.5–17.9)
Ocean County, New Jersey 766 12.6 1.7 (9.2–16.0)
Passaic County, New Jersey 862 11.3 1.9 (7.5–15.1)
Somerset County, New Jersey 560 12.5 2.0 (8.6–16.4)
Sussex County, New Jersey 541 17.4 2.2 (13.2–21.6)
Union County, New Jersey 480 13.6 2.2 (9.2–18.0)
Warren County, New Jersey 492 14.8 2.3 (10.3–19.3)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,129 12.1 1.3 (9.6–14.6)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 526 16.3 2.0 (12.4–20.2)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 361 13.5 2.9 (7.9–19.1)
San Juan County, New Mexico 529 9.7 1.7 (6.4–13.0)

TABLE 42. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,
by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 543 14.2 2.0 (10.2–18.2)
Kings County, New York 450 11.9 1.8 (8.3–15.5)
Nassau County, New York 338 11.5 2.1 (7.5–15.5)
New York County, New York 455 20.7 2.5 (15.9–25.5)
Queens County, New York 400 14.8 2.4 (10.1–19.5)
Suffolk County, New York 337 19.5 2.8 (14.0–25.0)
Westchester County, New York 252 8.8 2.1 (4.7–12.9)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 352 10.6 2.1 (6.5–14.7)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 380 7.5 2.2 (3.1–11.9)
Catawba County, North Carolina 397 12.2 2.3 (7.7–16.7)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 433 13.7 2.5 (8.8–18.6)
Durham County, North Carolina 386 10.2 2.1 (6.0–14.4)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 412 10.3 2.0 (6.3–14.3)
Gaston County, North Carolina 385 11.0 2.4 (6.3–15.7)
Guilford County, North Carolina 436 15.7 2.7 (10.4–21.0)
Johnston County, North Carolina 447 10.6 2.0 (6.7–14.5)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 812 16.4 1.7 (13.1–19.7)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 378 11.6 2.2 (7.2–16.0)
Orange County, North Carolina 361 12.4 2.2 (8.0–16.8)
Randolph County, North Carolina 381 7.3 1.8 (3.7–10.9)
Union County, North Carolina 387 11.9 2.6 (6.9–16.9)
Wake County, North Carolina 642 11.2 1.6 (8.1–14.3)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 391 18.9 2.4 (14.2–23.6)
Cass County, North Dakota 657 24.5 2.3 (19.9–29.1)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 407 14.4 3.5 (7.5–21.3)
Hamilton County, Ohio 365 15.3 3.5 (8.4–22.2)
Lorain County, Ohio 483 15.1 2.2 (10.8–19.4)
Lucas County, Ohio 704 18.0 2.2 (13.6–22.4)
Mahoning County, Ohio 809 16.3 2.3 (11.8–20.8)
Montgomery County, Ohio 735 13.4 1.8 (9.8–17.0)
Summit County, Ohio 673 16.4 2.1 (12.3–20.5)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 373 15.3 2.6 (10.2–20.4)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,252 16.7 1.5 (13.8–19.6)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,316 15.2 1.5 (12.3–18.1)
Clackamas County, Oregon 422 12.7 2.4 (8.1–17.3)
Lane County, Oregon 519 14.9 2.1 (10.8–19.0)
Multnomah County, Oregon 747 18.6 1.9 (14.9–22.3)
Washington County, Oregon 491 11.2 1.9 (7.4–15.0)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 501 19.4 2.3 (15.0–23.8)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,440 19.9 3.1 (13.8–26.0)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,552 17.3 1.6 (14.2–20.4)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 298 14.4 2.7 (9.0–19.8)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,698 14.8 2.2 (10.5–19.1)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 269 10.2 3.0 (4.2–16.2)
Kent County, Rhode Island 634 19.7 2.3 (15.1–24.3)
Newport County, Rhode Island 358 13.1 2.4 (8.4–17.8)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,714 17.3 1.1 (15.1–19.5)
Washington County, Rhode Island 503 17.5 2.6 (12.4–22.6)
Aiken County, South Carolina 514 13.8 2.0 (9.9–17.7)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 619 19.9 2.5 (14.9–24.9)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 256 20.0 3.3 (13.5–26.5)
Charleston County, South Carolina 551 22.0 2.5 (17.0–27.0)
Greenville County, South Carolina 499 9.9 1.6 (6.7–13.1)
Horry County, South Carolina 681 18.5 2.1 (14.4–22.6)
Lexington County, South Carolina 316 18.4 2.9 (12.8–24.0)
Richland County, South Carolina 435 17.9 2.6 (12.9–22.9)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 642 17.8 2.2 (13.5–22.1)
Pennington County, South Dakota 741 17.2 1.8 (13.6–20.8)
Davidson County, Tennessee 270 9.5 2.3 (5.0–14.0)
Shelby County, Tennessee 287 12.3 3.1 (6.1–18.5)
Bexar County, Texas 393 19.1 3.0 (13.3–24.9)
Dallas County, Texas 379 14.9 3.2 (8.6–21.2)
El Paso County, Texas 528 12.3 1.9 (8.6–16.0)
Harris County, Texas 376 16.7 3.5 (9.8–23.6)
Lubbock County, Texas 542 14.7 2.1 (10.6–18.8)
Tarrant County, Texas 439 13.8 2.7 (8.5–19.1)
Travis County, Texas 309 23.6 3.2 (17.4–29.8)
Davis County, Utah 413 7.8 1.7 (4.4–11.2)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,652 11.5 1.1 (9.4–13.6)

TABLE 42. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported binge drinking during the preceding month,
by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 248 14.2 2.7 (8.9–19.5)
Tooele County, Utah 268 15.3 3.2 (9.0–21.6)
Utah County, Utah 547 5.5 1.4 (2.8–8.2)
Weber County, Utah 413 12.2 2.1 (8.1–16.3)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,458 17.3 1.4 (14.5–20.1)
Franklin County, Vermont 449 16.5 2.2 (12.2–20.8)
Orange County, Vermont 370 17.5 2.7 (12.1–22.9)
Rutland County, Vermont 672 17.4 2.0 (13.4–21.4)
Washington County, Vermont 704 16.5 2.0 (12.7–20.3)
Windsor County, Vermont 719 14.4 1.6 (11.2–17.6)
Asotin County, Washington 344 21.7 2.9 (16.0–27.4)
Benton County, Washington 355 10.4 1.9 (6.7–14.1)
Chelan County, Washington 519 11.4 1.9 (7.7–15.1)
Clark County, Washington 1,507 11.2 1.1 (9.1–13.3)
Douglas County, Washington 493 12.1 1.8 (8.6–15.6)
Franklin County, Washington 303 11.6 2.4 (6.9–16.3)
King County, Washington 3,172 14.0 0.8 (12.4–15.6)
Kitsap County, Washington 890 16.4 1.7 (13.0–19.8)
Pierce County, Washington 1,573 15.1 1.3 (12.5–17.7)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,503 15.0 1.3 (12.4–17.6)
Spokane County, Washington 1,154 16.5 1.6 (13.4–19.6)
Thurston County, Washington 1,502 14.1 1.3 (11.6–16.6)
Yakima County, Washington 727 10.8 1.4 (8.0–13.6)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 442 10.8 1.9 (7.0–14.6)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 931 21.5 2.6 (16.4–26.6)
Laramie County, Wyoming 702 15.5 1.9 (11.8–19.2)
Natrona County, Wyoming 593 16.2 1.9 (12.5–19.9)
Median 15.2
Range 4.7–24.9
* For males, having at least five drinks on at least one occasion; for females: having at least four drinks on at least one occasion.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 43

TABLE 43. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the preceding
month, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 3,295 29.2 1.1 (27.1–31.3)
Alaska 2,109 21.4 1.2 (19.0–23.8)
Arizona 4,806 22.3 1.2 (20.0–24.6)
Arkansas 5,590 28.7 0.7 (27.2–30.2)
California 5,704 23.0 0.8 (21.5–24.5)
Colorado 6,098 17.4 0.6 (16.2–18.6)
Connecticut 8,491 19.8 0.5 (18.7–20.9)
Delaware 4,002 21.6 0.9 (19.9–23.3)
District of Columbia 4,019 22.1 0.9 (20.4–23.8)
Florida 10,712 25.1 0.6 (23.9–26.3)
Georgia 7,700 24.7 0.7 (23.3–26.1)
Hawaii 6,561 19.3 0.7 (18.0–20.6)
Idaho 5,331 20.8 0.7 (19.4–22.2)
Illinois 5,178 22.4 0.8 (20.9–23.9)
Indiana 6,531 25.3 0.7 (24.0–26.6)
Iowa 5,432 22.3 0.7 (21.0–23.6)
Kansas 8,297 22.6 0.6 (21.5–23.7)
Kentucky 6,170 30.4 0.9 (28.7–32.1)
Louisiana 7,071 31.0 0.7 (29.6–32.4)
Maine 4,036 20.9 0.8 (19.4–22.4)
Maryland 8,894 23.0 0.7 (21.7–24.3)
Massachusetts 12,715 21.1 0.6 (20.0–22.2)
Michigan 5,655 22.8 0.7 (21.4–24.2)
Minnesota 4,254 14.2 0.7 (12.9–15.5)
Mississippi 6,031 31.1 0.8 (29.6–32.6)
Missouri 5,388 23.2 0.9 (21.5–24.9)
Montana 6,054 19.4 0.6 (18.2–20.6)
Nebraska 7,962 21.0 0.6 (19.8–22.2)
Nevada 3,585 27.1 1.2 (24.8–29.4)
New Hampshire 6,038 19.6 0.6 (18.4–20.8)
New Jersey 13,434 27.0 0.6 (25.9–28.1)
New Mexico 6,579 22.6 0.7 (21.3–23.9)
New York 5,919 26.0 0.8 (24.5–27.5)
North Carolina 15,644 23.8 0.5 (22.9–24.7)
North Dakota 4,773 22.0 0.8 (20.5–23.5)
Ohio 5,815 24.5 1.1 (22.3–26.7)
Oklahoma 7,017 29.8 0.7 (28.5–31.1)
Oregon 4,857 16.4 0.7 (15.1–17.7)
Pennsylvania 13,237 22.9 0.7 (21.5–24.3)
Rhode Island 4,509 24.7 0.8 (23.1–26.3)
South Carolina 9,023 24.3 0.6 (23.1–25.5)
South Dakota 6,643 24.0 0.7 (22.5–25.5)
Tennessee 4,410 28.8 0.9 (27.0–30.6)
Texas 6,845 28.4 1.0 (26.4–30.4)
Utah 5,198 19.4 0.8 (17.9–20.9)
Vermont 6,998 17.9 0.5 (16.9–18.9)
Virginia 5,439 21.7 0.9 (19.9–23.5)
Washington 23,741 17.3 0.4 (16.6–18.0)
West Virginia 3,787 25.6 0.9 (23.9–27.3)
Wisconsin 4,827 19.3 0.8 (17.8–20.8)
Wyoming 4,983 21.9 0.7 (20.6–23.2)
Puerto Rico 4,685 41.2 0.9 (39.5–42.9)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,227 29.2 1.0 (27.3–31.1)
Median 22.8
Range 14.2–41.2
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 44

TABLE 44. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the preceding
month, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States,
2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 731 18.1 2.4 (13.4–22.8)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,822 19.2 1.2 (16.9–21.5)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 813 22.0 2.7 (16.7–27.3)
Asheville, North Carolina 536 24.0 2.5 (19.2–28.8)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,111 21.0 1.0 (19.0–23.0)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 539 26.8 2.4 (22.2–31.4)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 923 26.9 1.9 (23.1–30.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 535 21.6 2.5 (16.8–26.4)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,209 23.5 1.0 (21.6–25.4)
Barre, Vermont 726 17.8 1.7 (14.6–21.0)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,206 30.1 1.7 (26.8–33.4)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 1,740 18.6 1.3 (16.0–21.2)
Billings, Montana 507 16.8 1.8 (13.2–20.4)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 898 26.0 1.7 (22.6–29.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 576 19.1 1.9 (15.5–22.7)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,320 18.9 1.3 (16.4–21.4)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 2,354 21.4 1.2 (19.1–23.7)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 906 16.4 1.5 (13.4–19.4)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,462 19.0 1.1 (16.9–21.1)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,047 15.6 0.9 (13.8–17.4)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,348 19.0 1.2 (16.7–21.3)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,780 27.4 1.4 (24.6–30.2)
Casper, Wyoming 609 24.7 1.9 (20.9–28.5)
Charleston, West Virginia 685 23.1 1.8 (19.6–26.6)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,053 18.8 1.5 (16.0–21.6)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,301 21.2 1.1 (19.1–23.3)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 716 19.4 1.6 (16.2–22.6)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,735 22.6 1.0 (20.7–24.5)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 987 24.0 2.9 (18.4–29.6)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 997 22.4 2.5 (17.6–27.2)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 788 15.1 1.5 (12.2–18.0)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,032 21.3 1.5 (18.3–24.3)
Concord, New Hampshire 639 18.2 1.8 (14.7–21.7)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 547 22.7 2.5 (17.7–27.7)
Dayton, Ohio 808 26.1 2.7 (20.9–31.3)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,843 16.8 0.8 (15.1–18.5)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 960 20.8 1.5 (17.8–23.8)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 839 29.3 2.1 (25.2–33.4)
Dover, Delaware 1,376 25.3 1.4 (22.5–28.1)
Durham, North Carolina 1,027 20.6 1.7 (17.3–23.9)
Edison, New Jersey§ 2,971 24.3 1.0 (22.3–26.3)
El Paso, Texas 537 31.4 2.5 (26.5–36.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 1,783 23.5 1.8 (20.1–26.9)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 534 16.3 1.8 (12.8–19.8)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 723 23.9 3.0 (18.0–29.8)
Farmington, New Mexico 542 21.9 2.3 (17.4–26.4)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 567 21.4 2.1 (17.3–25.5)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 763 22.5 2.2 (18.2–26.8)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 503 26.7 3.2 (20.4–33.0)
Great Falls, Montana 522 17.4 1.8 (13.9–20.9)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 951 20.9 1.6 (17.7–24.1)
Greenville, South Carolina 823 22.1 1.8 (18.5–25.7)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 618 26.4 2.7 (21.0–31.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,695 18.3 0.9 (16.6–20.0)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 653 26.9 2.5 (22.1–31.7)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,406 19.4 1.3 (16.9–21.9)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 704 19.9 2.4 (15.2–24.6)
Honolulu, Hawaii 3,007 19.5 0.9 (17.8–21.2)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 551 30.9 3.6 (23.9–37.9)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 503 31.4 3.9 (23.8–39.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,093 25.1 1.2 (22.8–27.4)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,036 29.4 1.8 (26.0–32.8)
Jacksonville, Florida 698 25.1 2.4 (20.4–29.8)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,491 18.1 1.4 (15.3–20.9)
Kalispell, Montana 504 17.6 2.1 (13.6–21.6)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,293 20.8 1.0 (18.9–22.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 657 17.7 1.9 (13.9–21.5)
Keene, New Hampshire 500 21.2 2.3 (16.7–25.7)

TABLE 44. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the
preceding month, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 682 21.6 2.1 (17.5–25.7)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 538 27.1 2.4 (22.4–31.8)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,227 28.4 1.6 (25.3–31.5)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,588 18.5 1.2 (16.1–20.9)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 607 19.2 1.9 (15.5–22.9)
Lincoln, Nebraska 775 16.5 1.7 (13.1–19.9)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,236 26.9 1.6 (23.9–29.9)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 768 24.7 2.0 (20.9–28.5)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 921 27.1 1.8 (23.5–30.7)
Lubbock, Texas 576 26.9 2.3 (22.3–31.5)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,450 19.4 1.2 (17.0–21.8)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 841 30.3 2.6 (25.2–35.4)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,163 24.7 1.2 (22.4–27.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,366 19.1 1.8 (15.6–22.6)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,471 12.9 0.9 (11.2–14.6)
Missoula, Montana 508 14.2 1.8 (10.7–17.7)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 704 24.7 2.1 (20.5–28.9)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 632 22.5 1.9 (18.8–26.2)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 694 21.9 2.0 (18.0–25.8)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,353 27.9 1.3 (25.4–30.4)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,063 22.5 1.2 (20.2–24.8)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,471 30.6 1.7 (27.2–34.0)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 4,753 29.3 1.1 (27.1–31.5)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 601 17.3 1.8 (13.8–20.8)
Ocean City, New Jersey 553 22.1 2.3 (17.6–26.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 846 17.9 1.7 (14.5–21.3)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,182 28.3 1.2 (26.0–30.6)
Olympia, Washington 1,546 14.6 1.0 (12.5–16.7)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,749 20.8 1.1 (18.6–23.0)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 808 19.6 1.5 (16.6–22.6)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 2,631 25.7 1.9 (22.0–29.4)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,317 21.8 1.7 (18.5–25.1)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,658 23.2 1.4 (20.4–26.0)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,293 18.7 1.3 (16.1–21.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,800 14.6 0.8 (12.9–16.3)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,734 24.9 0.8 (23.4–26.4)
Provo-Orem, Utah 576 17.3 2.0 (13.3–21.3)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,204 16.7 1.4 (13.9–19.5)
Rapid City, South Dakota 970 22.1 1.5 (19.1–25.1)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,246 21.4 1.4 (18.6–24.2)
Richmond, Virginia 870 18.9 1.7 (15.6–22.2)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 704 29.8 2.1 (25.6–34.0)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,660 19.6 1.1 (17.3–21.9)
Rutland, Vermont 692 18.6 1.6 (15.4–21.8)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,607 20.6 1.6 (17.5–23.7)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,200 20.0 1.2 (17.6–22.4)
San Antonio, Texas 540 24.8 2.3 (20.4–29.2)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 547 25.3 2.5 (20.5–30.1)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 750 15.6 1.9 (11.8–19.4)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 557 20.5 2.3 (16.1–24.9)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 570 26.5 2.6 (21.4–31.6)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,788 24.4 2.1 (20.4–28.4)
Seaford, Delaware 1,316 24.0 1.4 (21.3–26.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,803 15.0 0.7 (13.7–16.3)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 643 23.6 2.0 (19.6–27.6)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 904 19.8 1.5 (16.8–22.8)
Spokane, Washington 1,194 18.1 1.4 (15.4–20.8)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,641 23.9 1.7 (20.5–27.3)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,618 19.6 1.2 (17.2–22.0)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,096 26.1 1.6 (22.9–29.3)
Toledo, Ohio 791 21.6 2.7 (16.3–26.9)
Topeka, Kansas 757 23.2 1.7 (19.8–26.6)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 508 21.4 2.2 (17.1–25.7)
Tucson, Arizona 785 22.5 2.5 (17.7–27.3)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,882 27.6 1.3 (25.0–30.2)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,136 20.7 1.8 (17.1–24.3)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,216 19.0 1.3 (16.5–21.5)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia§ 6,258 18.7 1.6 (15.6–21.8)

TABLE 44. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the
preceding month, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System,
United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,044 22.8 1.8 (19.3–26.3)
Wichita, Kansas 1,660 23.2 1.2 (20.8–25.6)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,817 21.9 1.2 (19.6–24.2)
Wilmington, North Carolina 677 20.1 2.3 (15.6–24.6)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 615 22.9 2.0 (19.0–26.8)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,743 20.7 1.3 (18.1–23.3)
Yakima, Washington 749 24.6 2.0 (20.8–28.4)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 928 22.3 2.9 (16.6–28.0)
Yuma, Arizona 513 29.5 2.5 (24.6–34.4)
Median 21.8
Range 12.9–31.4
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 45

TABLE 45. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the preceding
month, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 542 24.4 2.1 (20.2–28.6)
Maricopa County, Arizona 881 21.2 1.7 (17.8–24.6)
Pima County, Arizona 785 22.5 2.5 (17.7–27.3)
Pinal County, Arizona 436 NA§ NA —
Yuma County, Arizona 513 29.5 2.5 (24.6–34.4)
Benton County, Arkansas 381 25.0 2.6 (19.9–30.1)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 704 27.4 2.0 (23.5–31.3)
Washington County, Arkansas 327 21.1 2.7 (15.9–26.3)
Alameda County, California 275 14.2 2.7 (9.0–19.4)
Los Angeles County, California 768 24.7 2.0 (20.9–28.5)
Riverside County, California 357 27.0 2.9 (21.4–32.6)
San Bernardino County, California 347 31.0 3.0 (25.2–36.8)
San Diego County, California 547 25.3 2.5 (20.5–30.1)
Adams County, Colorado 435 22.4 2.5 (17.5–27.3)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 634 16.7 1.8 (13.3–20.1)
Denver County, Colorado 589 19.1 2.0 (15.2–23.0)
Douglas County, Colorado 297 10.6 1.9 (6.8–14.4)
El Paso County, Colorado 758 14.7 1.5 (11.8–17.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 732 14.1 1.5 (11.3–16.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,462 19.0 1.1 (16.9–21.1)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,965 19.3 1.0 (17.3–21.3)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 364 18.7 2.5 (13.8–23.6)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,063 22.5 1.2 (20.2–24.8)
New London County, Connecticut 601 17.3 1.8 (13.8–20.8)
Tolland County, Connecticut 366 13.4 2.0 (9.5–17.3)
Kent County, Delaware 1,376 25.3 1.4 (22.5–28.1)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,310 19.4 1.3 (16.9–21.9)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,316 24.0 1.4 (21.3–26.7)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 4,019 22.0 0.9 (20.3–23.7)
Broward County, Florida 729 19.7 1.7 (16.3–23.1)
Duval County, Florida 300 24.4 2.9 (18.6–30.2)
Hillsborough County, Florida 483 24.1 2.4 (19.3–28.9)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 919 31.5 1.9 (27.8–35.2)
Orange County, Florida 432 18.6 2.0 (14.8–22.4)
Palm Beach County, Florida 515 21.0 2.1 (16.8–25.2)
Pinellas County, Florida 348 30.3 3.1 (24.3–36.3)
Clayton County, Georgia 379 35.0 3.7 (27.8–42.2)
Cobb County, Georgia 389 15.9 2.3 (11.4–20.4)
DeKalb County, Georgia 438 22.2 3.0 (16.4–28.0)
Fulton County, Georgia 423 15.8 2.1 (11.6–20.0)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 359 20.9 2.9 (15.3–26.5)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,406 19.4 1.3 (16.9–21.9)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 3,007 19.5 0.9 (17.8–21.2)
Kauai County, Hawaii 657 17.7 1.9 (13.9–21.5)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,491 18.1 1.4 (15.3–20.9)
Ada County, Idaho 654 15.3 1.7 (12.0–18.6)
Canyon County, Idaho 522 24.2 2.1 (20.0–28.4)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 257 19.4 2.7 (14.1–24.7)
Cook County, Illinois 1,688 24.5 1.4 (21.8–27.2)
DuPage County, Illinois 373 19.1 2.6 (14.1–24.1)
Lake County, Illinois 263 15.4 2.8 (10.0–20.8)
Lake County, Indiana 525 26.0 2.3 (21.5–30.5)
Marion County, Indiana 1,341 27.7 1.5 (24.7–30.7)
Polk County, Iowa 727 21.8 1.8 (18.3–25.3)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,446 15.3 1.3 (12.8–17.8)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,249 24.8 1.5 (21.9–27.7)
Shawnee County, Kansas 552 22.8 2.0 (19.0–26.6)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 345 32.3 3.2 (26.0–38.6)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 471 27.2 2.5 (22.4–32.0)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 414 22.7 2.4 (18.0–27.4)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 687 27.1 2.1 (22.9–31.3)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 641 31.3 2.4 (26.7–35.9)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 276 27.8 3.9 (20.2–35.4)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 397 26.3 3.4 (19.6–33.0)
Cumberland County, Maine 673 16.0 1.7 (12.7–19.3)
York County, Maine 470 20.8 2.2 (16.5–25.1)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 583 18.4 1.8 (14.8–22.0)
Baltimore County, Maryland 950 25.5 1.7 (22.1–28.9)
Carroll County, Maryland 256 29.7 3.4 (23.1–36.3

TABLE 45. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the
preceding month, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 322 23.6 2.6 (18.4–28.8)
Charles County, Maryland 307 24.8 3.1 (18.8–30.8)
Frederick County, Maryland 586 18.5 2.0 (14.6–22.4)
Harford County, Maryland 292 23.7 2.9 (17.9–29.5)
Howard County, Maryland 324 13.7 2.3 (9.3–18.1)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,154 18.6 1.6 (15.5–21.7)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 659 23.5 2.2 (19.2–27.8)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 275 22.0 2.9 (16.2–27.8)
Washington County, Maryland 406 26.3 2.7 (21.0–31.6)
Baltimore city, Maryland 529 26.9 2.2 (22.5–31.3)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,225 25.4 1.7 (22.1–28.7)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,783 23.2 1.8 (19.7–26.7)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,327 27.0 2.1 (22.8–31.2)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,348 18.6 1.2 (16.2–21.0)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 633 15.7 1.6 (12.5–18.9)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 524 18.8 1.9 (15.0–22.6)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,197 27.1 2.0 (23.2–31.0)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,743 20.7 1.3 (18.1–23.3)
Macomb County, Michigan 382 23.5 2.5 (18.6–28.4)
Oakland County, Michigan 593 17.4 1.8 (13.8–21.0)
Wayne County, Michigan 839 29.3 2.1 (25.2–33.4)
Dakota County, Minnesota 294 10.8 1.9 (7.0–14.6)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 886 10.7 1.2 (8.4–13.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 414 12.3 1.9 (8.6–16.0)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 258 29.3 3.8 (21.8–36.8)
Hinds County, Mississippi 461 27.8 2.5 (22.9–32.7)
Rankin County, Mississippi 273 30.7 3.3 (24.3–37.1)
Jackson County, Missouri 525 23.8 2.2 (19.6–28.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 351 18.8 3.0 (12.9–24.7)
St. Louis city, Missouri 605 20.6 2.4 (15.8–25.4)
Cascade County, Montana 522 17.4 1.8 (13.9–20.9)
Flathead County, Montana 504 17.6 2.1 (13.6–21.6)
Missoula County, Montana 508 14.2 1.8 (10.7–17.7)
Yellowstone County, Montana 462 16.5 1.9 (12.8–20.2)
Douglas County, Nebraska 985 20.6 1.5 (17.7–23.5)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 721 16.7 1.8 (13.1–20.3)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 293 16.0 2.3 (11.4–20.6)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 557 25.7 2.6 (20.6–30.8)
Clark County, Nevada 1,227 28.4 1.6 (25.3–31.5)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,229 21.6 1.4 (18.8–24.4)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 500 21.2 2.3 (16.7–25.7)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 470 16.2 1.8 (12.6–19.8)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,450 19.4 1.2 (17.0–21.8)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 639 18.2 1.8 (14.7–21.7)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,027 19.2 1.4 (16.5–21.9)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 633 21.0 1.9 (17.3–24.7)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 539 26.8 2.4 (22.2–31.4)
Bergen County, New Jersey 964 23.7 1.8 (20.1–27.3)
Burlington County, New Jersey 553 27.8 2.5 (22.9–32.7)
Camden County, New Jersey 645 29.4 2.4 (24.6–34.2)
Cape May County, New Jersey 553 22.1 2.3 (17.6–26.6)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,043 29.3 1.8 (25.7–32.9)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 582 22.3 2.0 (18.4–26.2)
Hudson County, New Jersey 851 36.1 2.3 (31.5–40.7)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 522 17.3 2.2 (13.0–21.6)
Mercer County, New Jersey 508 21.4 2.2 (17.1–25.7)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 829 25.2 2.0 (21.4–29.0)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 764 22.0 2.0 (18.1–25.9)
Morris County, New Jersey 707 22.8 2.1 (18.7–26.9)
Ocean County, New Jersey 796 26.7 1.9 (23.0–30.4)
Passaic County, New Jersey 896 35.7 2.6 (30.7–40.7)
Somerset County, New Jersey 582 20.6 2.0 (16.6–24.6)
Sussex County, New Jersey 559 24.8 2.5 (19.9–29.7)
Union County, New Jersey 493 30.0 2.6 (24.8–35.2)
Warren County, New Jersey 514 25.0 2.6 (19.9–30.1)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,161 18.0 1.4 (15.3–20.7)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 538 27.1 2.4 (22.4–31.8)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 369 20.4 2.7 (15.2–25.6)
San Juan County, New Mexico 542 21.9 2.3 (17.4–26.4)

TABLE 45. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the
preceding month, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 557 20.5 2.3 (16.1–24.9)
Kings County, New York 468 35.0 2.7 (29.6–40.4)
Nassau County, New York 346 21.9 2.8 (16.4–27.4)
New York County, New York 467 16.1 2.1 (11.9–20.3)
Queens County, New York 420 34.0 2.9 (28.3–39.7)
Suffolk County, New York 348 21.3 2.7 (16.1–26.5)
Westchester County, New York 260 20.6 2.9 (14.9–26.3)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 359 24.3 2.8 (18.7–29.9)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 388 26.5 3.0 (20.5–32.5)
Catawba County, North Carolina 402 22.9 2.5 (17.9–27.9)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 444 21.0 2.3 (16.5–25.5)
Durham County, North Carolina 398 19.9 2.5 (15.1–24.7)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 422 21.7 2.4 (17.0–26.4)
Gaston County, North Carolina 390 34.3 3.0 (28.4–40.2)
Guilford County, North Carolina 449 19.2 2.2 (14.9–23.5)
Johnston County, North Carolina 452 26.4 2.7 (21.1–31.7)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 834 16.6 1.5 (13.6–19.6)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 393 21.5 3.2 (15.2–27.8)
Orange County, North Carolina 365 10.6 1.9 (7.0–14.2)
Randolph County, North Carolina 389 21.4 2.4 (16.8–26.0)
Union County, North Carolina 392 19.8 2.4 (15.1–24.5)
Wake County, North Carolina 653 13.0 1.7 (9.7–16.3)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 409 16.7 2.1 (12.6–20.8)
Cass County, North Dakota 675 19.0 1.9 (15.3–22.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 422 26.4 3.6 (19.2–33.6)
Hamilton County, Ohio 377 20.5 4.4 (11.8–29.2)
Lorain County, Ohio 490 23.2 3.2 (17.0–29.4)
Lucas County, Ohio 730 23.8 2.0 (19.9–27.7)
Mahoning County, Ohio 833 27.9 2.7 (22.6–33.2)
Montgomery County, Ohio 754 26.2 2.3 (21.7–30.7)
Summit County, Ohio 695 18.8 2.0 (15.0–22.6)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 377 19.9 2.4 (15.2–24.6)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,286 30.9 1.6 (27.8–34.0)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,352 26.9 1.5 (23.9–29.9)
Clackamas County, Oregon 450 14.3 2.1 (10.1–18.5)
Lane County, Oregon 534 16.3 1.8 (12.8–19.8)
Multnomah County, Oregon 776 13.2 1.4 (10.4–16.0)
Washington County, Oregon 505 13.7 2.0 (9.7–17.7)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 516 20.4 1.9 (16.7–24.1)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,498 30.7 2.2 (26.5–34.9)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,632 27.1 1.8 (23.5–30.7)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 308 17.1 2.4 (12.5–21.7)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,762 32.4 2.8 (27.0–37.8)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 282 26.1 3.9 (18.5–33.7)
Kent County, Rhode Island 650 26.3 2.0 (22.3–30.3)
Newport County, Rhode Island 368 17.3 2.3 (12.9–21.7)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,780 26.7 1.1 (24.6–28.8)
Washington County, Rhode Island 518 19.6 2.3 (15.1–24.1)
Aiken County, South Carolina 534 22.5 2.1 (18.4–26.6)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 634 17.7 2.6 (12.7–22.7)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 260 18.7 2.8 (13.2–24.2)
Charleston County, South Carolina 579 16.9 1.9 (13.2–20.6)
Greenville County, South Carolina 515 18.5 2.0 (14.6–22.4)
Horry County, South Carolina 704 24.7 2.1 (20.5–28.9)
Lexington County, South Carolina 321 19.4 2.4 (14.8–24.0)
Richland County, South Carolina 445 20.3 2.4 (15.6–25.0)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 664 20.7 2.0 (16.9–24.5)
Pennington County, South Dakota 758 22.6 1.8 (19.1–26.1)
Davidson County, Tennessee 277 23.9 3.0 (18.0–29.8)
Shelby County, Tennessee 295 28.7 3.5 (21.9–35.5)
Bexar County, Texas 404 23.4 2.5 (18.6–28.2)
Dallas County, Texas 394 25.2 3.4 (18.5–31.9)
El Paso County, Texas 537 31.4 2.5 (26.5–36.3)
Harris County, Texas 385 30.2 4.6 (21.1–39.3)
Lubbock County, Texas 561 26.4 2.3 (21.8–31.0)
Tarrant County, Texas 450 26.4 3.4 (19.8–33.0)
Travis County, Texas 317 22.3 3.2 (16.1–28.5)
Davis County, Utah 415 11.3 1.6 (8.2–14.4)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,677 19.9 1.3 (17.4–22.4)

TABLE 45. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the
preceding month, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 253 17.6 3.0 (11.7–23.5)
Tooele County, Utah 270 22.2 2.8 (16.6–27.8)
Utah County, Utah 547 17.4 2.1 (13.3–21.5)
Weber County, Utah 417 25.3 2.8 (19.9–30.7)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,492 13.4 1.0 (11.4–15.4)
Franklin County, Vermont 458 22.2 2.2 (18.0–26.4)
Orange County, Vermont 379 22.2 2.4 (17.5–26.9)
Rutland County, Vermont 692 18.6 1.6 (15.4–21.8)
Washington County, Vermont 726 17.8 1.7 (14.6–21.0)
Windsor County, Vermont 739 19.1 1.7 (15.8–22.4)
Asotin County, Washington 350 21.5 2.6 (16.4–26.6)
Benton County, Washington 365 20.6 2.6 (15.6–25.6)
Chelan County, Washington 540 23.6 2.5 (18.7–28.5)
Clark County, Washington 1,559 15.8 1.1 (13.7–17.9)
Douglas County, Washington 504 20.7 2.2 (16.4–25.0)
Franklin County, Washington 317 25.6 3.1 (19.6–31.6)
King County, Washington 3,257 14.0 0.7 (12.6–15.4)
Kitsap County, Washington 906 16.4 1.5 (13.4–19.4)
Pierce County, Washington 1,618 19.5 1.2 (17.2–21.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,546 16.5 1.2 (14.2–18.8)
Spokane County, Washington 1,194 18.1 1.4 (15.4–20.8)
Thurston County, Washington 1,546 14.6 1.0 (12.5–16.7)
Yakima County, Washington 749 24.6 2.0 (20.8–28.4)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 447 23.2 2.3 (18.7–27.7)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 987 20.0 2.1 (16.0–24.0)
Laramie County, Wyoming 716 19.4 1.6 (16.2–22.6)
Natrona County, Wyoming 609 24.7 1.9 (20.9–28.5)
Median 21.6
Range 10.6–36.1
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.
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Table 46

TABLE 46. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or riding in a car, by
state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 3,228 82.1 1.0 (80.1–84.1)
Alaska 2,079 77.6 1.2 (75.2–80.0)
Arizona 4,684 81.9 1.2 (79.5–84.3)
Arkansas 5,501 69.9 0.8 (68.3–71.5)
California 5,440 91.9 0.5 (90.9–92.9)
Colorado 5,953 81.6 0.7 (80.3–82.9)
Connecticut 8,284 84.5 0.6 (83.4–85.6)
Delaware 3,984 85.5 0.9 (83.7–87.3)
District of Columbia 3,896 86.7 0.8 (85.2–88.2)
Florida 10,504 82.7 0.6 (81.5–83.9)
Georgia 7,472 82.5 0.7 (81.1–83.9)
Hawaii 6,439 91.7 0.6 (90.6–92.8)
Idaho 5,249 73.2 0.8 (71.6–74.8)
Illinois 5,150 81.2 0.7 (79.8–82.6)
Indiana 6,406 79.3 0.7 (78.0–80.6)
Iowa 5,314 79.9 0.7 (78.5–81.3)
Kansas 8,239 68.9 0.7 (67.5–70.3)
Kentucky 5,582 75.9 0.9 (74.1–77.7)
Louisiana 6,964 86.8 0.6 (85.6–88.0)
Maine 3,956 75.5 0.9 (73.8–77.2)
Maryland 8,638 87.8 0.5 (86.7–88.9)
Massachusetts 12,276 76.2 0.7 (74.9–77.5)
Michigan 5,602 87.8 0.6 (86.6–89.0)
Minnesota 4,242 80.2 0.8 (78.6–81.8)
Mississippi 5,956 71.6 0.9 (69.9–73.3)
Missouri 5,261 68.9 1.1 (66.8–71.0)
Montana 5,909 68.1 0.8 (66.4–69.8)
Nebraska 7,844 66.2 0.8 (64.6–67.8)
Nevada 3,523 80.9 1.1 (78.8–83.0)
New Hampshire 5,894 65.0 0.8 (63.4–66.6)
New Jersey 12,933 84.4 0.5 (83.4–85.4)
New Mexico 6,398 87.4 0.6 (86.3–88.5)
New York 5,746 84.0 0.7 (82.6–85.4)
North Carolina 15,492 86.7 0.4 (85.9–87.5)
North Dakota 4,689 58.4 1.0 (56.5–60.3)
Ohio 5,704 74.1 1.2 (71.7–76.5)
Oklahoma 6,943 79.8 0.6 (78.6–81.0)
Oregon 4,781 90.7 0.6 (89.5–91.9)
Pennsylvania 12,929 71.7 0.8 (70.1–73.3)
Rhode Island 4,425 78.0 0.9 (76.2–79.8)
South Carolina 8,896 78.2 0.7 (76.9–79.5)
South Dakota 6,543 58.4 0.8 (56.7–60.1)
Tennessee 4,338 83.0 1.0 (81.1–84.9)
Texas 6,680 89.6 0.7 (88.2–91.0)
Utah 5,146 76.6 0.9 (74.9–78.3)
Vermont 6,930 78.8 0.6 (77.6–80.0)
Virginia 5,307 80.7 0.9 (79.0–82.4)
Washington 23,504 91.5 0.3 (90.9–92.1)
West Virginia 3,774 78.0 0.9 (76.3–79.7)
Wisconsin 4,663 69.0 0.9 (67.1–70.9)
Wyoming 4,925 63.1 0.9 (61.4–64.8)
Puerto Rico 4,653 88.6 0.7 (87.3–89.9)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,149 77.5 0.9 (75.6–79.4)
Median 79.9
Range 58.4–91.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 47

TABLE 47. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or riding in a car, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 717 76.8 2.4 (72.0–81.6)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,765 90.4 1.0 (88.5–92.3)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 782 82.1 2.7 (76.8–87.4)
Asheville, North Carolina 530 87.6 2.1 (83.6–91.6)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,021 85.7 1.0 (83.7–87.7)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 525 85.8 2.2 (81.6–90.0)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 896 83.1 1.7 (79.7–86.5)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 522 92.3 1.6 (89.2–95.4)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,104 87.7 0.8 (86.1–89.3)
Barre, Vermont 714 77.5 2.0 (73.6–81.4)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,184 87.3 1.3 (84.7–89.9)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 1,700 89.5 1.2 (87.2–91.8)
Billings, Montana 490 69.6 2.6 (64.5–74.7)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 887 80.9 1.9 (77.2–84.6)
Bismarck, North Dakota 565 64.0 2.4 (59.2–68.8)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,303 78.9 1.4 (76.1–81.7)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 2,274 76.0 1.4 (73.3–78.7)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 900 92.8 1.3 (90.2–95.4)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,397 84.3 1.1 (82.1–86.5)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,033 81.4 1.2 (79.1–83.7)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,262 79.5 1.3 (76.9–82.1)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,720 85.1 1.2 (82.8–87.4)
Casper, Wyoming 599 64.8 2.3 (60.3–69.3)
Charleston, West Virginia 683 81.4 1.9 (77.7–85.1)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,031 80.3 1.7 (76.9–83.7)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,277 85.7 1.2 (83.4–88.0)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 710 75.6 2.0 (71.7–79.5)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,698 83.0 0.9 (81.3–84.7)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 940 76.2 3.4 (69.5–82.9)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 980 68.7 3.0 (62.7–74.7)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 774 83.2 1.7 (79.9–86.5)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,023 81.6 1.7 (78.3–84.9)
Concord, New Hampshire 628 66.3 2.4 (61.7–70.9)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 536 92.0 1.6 (88.8–95.2)
Dayton, Ohio 788 75.7 2.7 (70.4–81.0)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,776 85.0 0.9 (83.3–86.7)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 942 85.4 1.4 (82.6–88.2)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 827 89.9 1.4 (87.1–92.7)
Dover, Delaware 1,371 86.6 1.2 (84.3–88.9)
Durham, North Carolina 1,020 88.7 1.4 (85.9–91.5)
Edison, New Jersey§ 2,857 85.2 1.1 (83.1–87.3)
El Paso, Texas 520 92.4 1.5 (89.5–95.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 1,721 78.0 1.7 (74.7–81.3)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 528 91.2 1.7 (87.9–94.5)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 710 74.8 3.1 (68.8–80.8)
Farmington, New Mexico 529 85.3 2.0 (81.3–89.3)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 565 88.0 2.0 (84.1–91.9)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 758 77.0 2.3 (72.5–81.5)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 490 91.1 2.2 (86.9–95.3)
Great Falls, Montana 511 74.6 2.3 (70.1–79.1)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 939 85.4 1.5 (82.4–88.4)
Greenville, South Carolina 817 81.9 1.8 (78.4–85.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 615 77.9 2.9 (72.3–83.5)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,633 84.0 1.0 (82.1–85.9)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 649 89.9 1.8 (86.5–93.3)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,393 92.3 1.0 (90.4–94.2)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 698 76.1 2.6 (71.1–81.1)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,952 91.8 0.7 (90.4–93.2)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 540 89.8 2.5 (85.0–94.6)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 478 80.7 2.7 (75.5–85.9)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,044 83.3 1.1 (81.1–85.5)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,016 74.3 1.9 (70.6–78.0)
Jacksonville, Florida 685 82.8 2.2 (78.4–87.2)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,452 91.5 1.1 (89.4–93.6)
Kalispell, Montana 496 75.3 2.4 (70.5–80.1)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,249 77.9 1.1 (75.8–80.0)
Kapaa, Hawaii 642 89.6 1.9 (85.9–93.3)
Keene, New Hampshire 485 60.4 3.0 (54.4–66.4)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 673 91.0 1.6 (87.9–94.1)

TABLE 47. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or
riding in a car, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United
States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 526 92.0 1.5 (89.0–95.0)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,191 81.4 1.5 (78.5–84.3)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,561 70.6 1.8 (67.2–74.0)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 602 85.5 1.9 (81.7–89.3)
Lincoln, Nebraska 771 73.7 2.1 (69.5–77.9)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,213 77.4 1.6 (74.2–80.6)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 727 93.3 1.2 (91.0–95.6)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 854 81.1 2.0 (77.2–85.0)
Lubbock, Texas 557 89.2 1.8 (85.7–92.7)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,405 66.3 1.6 (63.2–69.4)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 828 85.5 2.2 (81.2–89.8)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,114 84.3 1.2 (82.0–86.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,289 70.8 2.1 (66.6–75.0)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,460 84.4 1.0 (82.4–86.4)
Missoula, Montana 496 76.3 2.6 (71.1–81.5)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 693 78.7 2.5 (73.7–83.7)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 619 86.5 2.0 (82.7–90.3)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 677 86.6 1.6 (83.4–89.8)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,230 83.4 1.1 (81.2–85.6)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,008 84.8 1.2 (82.5–87.1)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,457 89.4 1.2 (87.1–91.7)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 4,550 82.3 1.0 (80.3–84.3)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 590 86.0 1.8 (82.4–89.6)
Ocean City, New Jersey 529 83.8 2.4 (79.0–88.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 841 79.5 1.7 (76.1–82.9)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,161 83.0 1.0 (81.0–85.0)
Olympia, Washington 1,534 91.5 1.0 (89.5–93.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,720 77.2 1.3 (74.6–79.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 795 86.2 1.6 (83.1–89.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 2,553 73.7 2.0 (69.8–77.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,290 81.6 1.8 (78.1–85.1)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,567 69.0 1.8 (65.4–72.6)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,274 80.5 1.5 (77.5–83.5)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,746 91.2 0.7 (89.7–92.7)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,563 77.6 0.8 (76.0–79.2)
Provo-Orem, Utah 570 76.7 2.5 (71.8–81.6)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,197 91.8 1.1 (89.7–93.9)
Rapid City, South Dakota 950 66.9 1.9 (63.3–70.5)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,227 83.9 1.3 (81.4–86.4)
Richmond, Virginia 849 82.3 2.0 (78.3–86.3)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 663 90.8 1.5 (87.9–93.7)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,623 66.1 1.6 (63.0–69.2)
Rutland, Vermont 691 80.7 1.8 (77.1–84.3)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,576 72.2 2.0 (68.2–76.2)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,169 81.0 1.2 (78.6–83.4)
San Antonio, Texas 523 86.6 2.3 (82.0–91.2)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 527 90.2 1.7 (86.9–93.5)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 721 91.2 1.6 (88.1–94.3)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 544 87.5 1.8 (83.9–91.1)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 561 58.8 2.7 (53.4–64.2)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,726 62.3 2.7 (57.0–67.6)
Seaford, Delaware 1,309 86.3 1.3 (83.8–88.8)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§§ 4,758 92.7 0.5 (91.7–93.7)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 627 89.1 1.8 (85.6–92.6)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 890 68.1 1.9 (64.4–71.8)
Spokane, Washington 1,182 93.1 1.1 (90.9–95.3)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,589 72.8 2.1 (68.7–76.9)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,601 91.0 1.0 (89.0–93.0)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,066 83.2 1.6 (80.0–86.4)
Toledo, Ohio 771 74.9 3.6 (67.8–82.0)
Topeka, Kansas 752 73.6 2.1 (69.6–77.6)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 489 87.4 2.2 (83.2–91.6)
Tucson, Arizona 772 85.3 2.0 (81.4–89.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,860 84.6 1.2 (82.3–86.9)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,095 80.9 1.9 (77.1–84.7)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,203 89.6 1.2 (87.3–91.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia§ 6,077 86.4 1.6 (83.2–89.6)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,030 92.9 1.0 (90.9–94.9)

TABLE 47. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or
riding in a car, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United
States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,644 69.0 1.6 (65.9–72.1)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,790 85.8 1.3 (83.3–88.3)
Wilmington, North Carolina 671 87.4 1.7 (84.0–90.8)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 606 85.5 1.7 (82.1–88.9)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,691 75.0 1.6 (71.8–78.2)
Yakima, Washington 737 92.2 1.5 (89.3–95.1)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 913 75.9 3.3 (69.5–82.3)
Yuma, Arizona 489 81.4 2.4 (76.7–86.1)
Median 83.3
Range 58.8–93.3
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 48

TABLE 48. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or riding in a car, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†
Jefferson County, Alabama 536 83.1 2.3 (78.7–87.5)
Maricopa County, Arizona 864 82.3 1.9 (78.6–86.0)
Pima County, Arizona 772 85.3 2.0 (81.4–89.2)
Pinal County, Arizona 426 NA§ NA —
Yuma County, Arizona 489 81.4 2.4 (76.7–86.1)
Benton County, Arkansas 379 79.6 2.3 (75.0–84.2)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 692 78.6 1.9 (74.8–82.4)
Washington County, Arkansas 325 76.8 3.0 (71.0–82.6)
Alameda County, California 264 92.3 2.1 (88.2–96.4)
Los Angeles County, California 727 93.3 1.2 (91.0–95.6)
Riverside County, California 338 88.7 2.3 (84.2–93.2)
San Bernardino County, California 325 92.9 1.7 (89.6–96.2)
San Diego County, California 527 90.2 1.7 (86.9–93.5)
Adams County, Colorado 421 85.2 2.1 (81.0–89.4)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 611 82.8 2.0 (78.8–86.8)
Denver County, Colorado 582 86.3 1.7 (82.9–89.7)
Douglas County, Colorado 291 87.9 2.4 (83.2–92.6)
El Paso County, Colorado 745 83.0 1.7 (79.6–86.4)
Jefferson County, Colorado 716 85.0 1.7 (81.7–88.3)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,397 84.3 1.1 (82.1–86.5)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,914 83.6 1.1 (81.4–85.8)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 359 86.2 2.3 (81.6–90.8)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,008 84.8 1.2 (82.5–87.1)
New London County, Connecticut 590 86.0 1.8 (82.4–89.6)
Tolland County, Connecticut 360 86.0 2.5 (81.0–91.0)
Kent County, Delaware 1,371 86.6 1.2 (84.3–88.9)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,304 85.0 1.4 (82.2–87.8)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,309 86.3 1.3 (83.8–88.8)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,896 86.7 0.8 (85.2–88.2)
Broward County, Florida 708 85.1 1.8 (81.6–88.6)
Duval County, Florida 294 84.3 2.9 (78.6–90.0)
Hillsborough County, Florida 468 83.7 2.3 (79.2–88.2)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 904 87.4 1.5 (84.5–90.3)
Orange County, Florida 424 88.0 2.0 (84.1–91.9)
Palm Beach County, Florida 502 81.8 2.4 (77.2–86.4)
Pinellas County, Florida 337 79.7 3.2 (73.5–85.9)
Clayton County, Georgia 362 85.4 3.8 (78.0–92.8)
Cobb County, Georgia 374 90.5 2.1 (86.3–94.7)
DeKalb County, Georgia 429 87.7 2.6 (82.6–92.8)
Fulton County, Georgia 411 88.9 2.1 (84.9–92.9)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 348 86.3 2.7 (81.0–91.6)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,393 92.3 1.0 (90.4–94.2)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,952 91.8 0.7 (90.4–93.2)
Kauai County, Hawaii 642 89.6 1.9 (85.9–93.3)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,452 91.5 1.1 (89.4–93.6)
Ada County, Idaho 649 81.4 1.9 (77.6–85.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 512 77.5 2.2 (73.1–81.9)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 255 82.9 2.6 (77.8–88.0)
Cook County, Illinois 1,679 82.8 1.2 (80.4–85.2)
DuPage County, Illinois 371 85.4 2.3 (80.9–89.9)
Lake County, Illinois 261 86.6 2.6 (81.4–91.8)
Lake County, Indiana 512 84.3 2.1 (80.2–88.4)
Marion County, Indiana 1,302 85.0 1.3 (82.5–87.5)
Polk County, Iowa 715 86.0 1.6 (82.9–89.1)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,439 84.0 1.3 (81.5–86.5)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,236 70.1 1.8 (66.6–73.6)
Shawnee County, Kansas 548 76.5 2.4 (71.9–81.1)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 340 73.5 3.1 (67.3–79.7)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 422 86.2 2.1 (82.0–90.4)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 402 88.4 2.3 (83.9–92.9)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 676 87.0 1.8 (83.4–90.6)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 634 89.5 1.7 (86.2–92.8)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 271 93.7 1.6 (90.5–96.9)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 394 84.9 3.4 (78.3–91.5)
Cumberland County, Maine 662 81.8 2.1 (77.7–85.9)
York County, Maine 463 79.0 2.2 (74.6–83.4)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 564 88.3 1.7 (84.9–91.7)
Baltimore County, Maryland 922 88.5 1.4 (85.8–91.2)
Carroll County, Maryland 248 91.5 2.1 (87.5–95.5)

TABLE 48. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or
riding in a car, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 307 88.4 2.2 (84.2–92.6)
Charles County, Maryland 297 88.6 2.0 (84.7–92.5)
Frederick County, Maryland 574 84.9 2.4 (80.2–89.6)
Harford County, Maryland 279 87.8 2.5 (82.9–92.7)
Howard County, Maryland 320 90.1 2.3 (85.6–94.6)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,126 90.3 1.3 (87.7–92.9)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 641 87.6 1.7 (84.2–91.0)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 265 85.2 2.8 (79.6–90.8)
Washington County, Maryland 403 84.1 2.5 (79.2–89.0)
Baltimore city, Maryland 506 82.6 2.1 (78.5–86.7)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,138 76.8 1.7 (73.6–80.0)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,721 77.5 1.8 (74.0–81.0)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,281 72.0 2.5 (67.2–76.8)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,262 78.8 1.4 (76.0–81.6)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 620 77.1 2.4 (72.4–81.8)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 505 71.1 2.6 (66.0–76.2)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,149 79.3 1.7 (76.0–82.6)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,691 75.0 1.6 (71.8–78.2)
Macomb County, Michigan 378 90.2 2.3 (85.8–94.6)
Oakland County, Michigan 584 88.2 1.7 (84.8–91.6)
Wayne County, Michigan 827 89.9 1.4 (87.1–92.7)
Dakota County, Minnesota 294 83.9 2.6 (78.7–89.1)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 882 88.5 1.4 (85.8–91.2)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 412 84.2 2.5 (79.3–89.1)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 257 76.6 4.0 (68.9–84.3)
Hinds County, Mississippi 454 70.3 2.8 (64.8–75.8)
Rankin County, Mississippi 266 81.2 2.8 (75.8–86.6)
Jackson County, Missouri 508 78.8 2.5 (73.9–83.7)
St. Louis County, Missouri 342 72.8 3.9 (65.2–80.4)
St. Louis city, Missouri 588 72.4 3.0 (66.4–78.4)
Cascade County, Montana 511 74.6 2.3 (70.1–79.1)
Flathead County, Montana 496 75.3 2.4 (70.5–80.1)
Missoula County, Montana 496 76.3 2.6 (71.1–81.5)
Yellowstone County, Montana 446 70.8 2.7 (65.5–76.1)
Douglas County, Nebraska 967 77.3 1.7 (74.0–80.6)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 717 74.5 2.2 (70.2–78.8)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 290 83.6 2.6 (78.6–88.6)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 547 58.0 2.8 (52.5–63.5)
Clark County, Nevada 1,191 81.4 1.5 (78.5–84.3)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,210 83.9 1.3 (81.3–86.5)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 485 60.4 3.0 (54.4–66.4)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 465 64.3 3.0 (58.4–70.2)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,405 66.3 1.6 (63.2–69.4)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 628 66.3 2.4 (61.7–70.9)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,002 68.4 1.8 (64.9–71.9)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 621 64.9 2.4 (60.2–69.6)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 525 85.8 2.2 (81.6–90.0)
Bergen County, New Jersey 927 84.8 1.6 (81.6–88.0)
Burlington County, New Jersey 534 87.4 1.8 (83.8–91.0)
Camden County, New Jersey 625 82.2 2.2 (77.9–86.5)
Cape May County, New Jersey 529 83.8 2.4 (79.0–88.6)
Essex County, New Jersey 996 82.7 1.9 (79.0–86.4)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 561 85.5 1.9 (81.8–89.2)
Hudson County, New Jersey 811 83.6 1.8 (80.1–87.1)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 506 87.7 1.9 (83.9–91.5)
Mercer County, New Jersey 489 87.4 2.2 (83.2–91.6)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 798 86.5 2.0 (82.6–90.4)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 730 84.0 2.0 (80.1–87.9)
Morris County, New Jersey 685 89.8 1.6 (86.8–92.8)
Ocean County, New Jersey 764 84.4 1.9 (80.6–88.2)
Passaic County, New Jersey 857 83.0 2.3 (78.6–87.4)
Somerset County, New Jersey 565 87.5 2.0 (83.6–91.4)
Sussex County, New Jersey 540 85.5 2.0 (81.6–89.4)
Union County, New Jersey 477 78.9 2.6 (73.9–83.9)
Warren County, New Jersey 493 84.8 2.2 (80.6–89.0)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,124 91.2 1.0 (89.2–93.2)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 526 92.0 1.5 (89.0–95.0)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 353 90.7 2.1 (86.6–94.8)
San Juan County, New Mexico 529 85.3 2.0 (81.3–89.3)

TABLE 48. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or
riding in a car, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 544 87.5 1.8 (83.9–91.1)
Kings County, New York 440 78.4 2.4 (73.6–83.2)
Nassau County, New York 338 86.1 2.3 (81.6–90.6)
New York County, New York 453 81.5 2.2 (77.1–85.9)
Queens County, New York 398 87.0 2.3 (82.5–91.5)
Suffolk County, New York 339 86.1 2.4 (81.3–90.9)
Westchester County, New York 254 84.1 2.9 (78.4–89.8)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 357 85.8 2.3 (81.2–90.4)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 386 90.1 2.2 (85.8–94.4)
Catawba County, North Carolina 402 92.6 1.7 (89.3–95.9)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 443 86.8 2.4 (82.2–91.4)
Durham County, North Carolina 395 88.0 2.0 (84.1–91.9)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 416 85.0 2.2 (80.6–89.4)
Gaston County, North Carolina 387 88.8 2.1 (84.6–93.0)
Guilford County, North Carolina 440 85.9 2.1 (81.7–90.1)
Johnston County, North Carolina 450 86.6 2.3 (82.0–91.2)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 822 86.2 1.7 (82.9–89.5)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 389 87.6 2.2 (83.3–91.9)
Orange County, North Carolina 362 91.5 1.7 (88.1–94.9)
Randolph County, North Carolina 387 86.1 2.1 (82.0–90.2)
Union County, North Carolina 388 88.6 2.6 (83.5–93.7)
Wake County, North Carolina 649 93.6 1.2 (91.2–96.0)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 402 67.8 2.9 (62.2–73.4)
Cass County, North Dakota 662 71.3 2.2 (66.9–75.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 413 68.6 4.3 (60.2–77.0)
Hamilton County, Ohio 368 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 484 74.2 2.8 (68.7–79.7)
Lucas County, Ohio 711 76.3 2.4 (71.6–81.0)
Mahoning County, Ohio 819 73.1 2.5 (68.2–78.0)
Montgomery County, Ohio 739 77.6 2.2 (73.3–81.9)
Summit County, Ohio 681 73.3 2.4 (68.5–78.1)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 376 86.6 2.2 (82.3–90.9)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,273 83.5 1.4 (80.9–86.1)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,332 86.8 1.2 (84.4–89.2)
Clackamas County, Oregon 443 89.3 1.9 (85.5–93.1)
Lane County, Oregon 528 91.2 1.7 (87.9–94.5)
Multnomah County, Oregon 762 90.8 1.4 (88.0–93.6)
Washington County, Oregon 497 93.8 1.3 (91.3–96.3)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 499 68.8 2.5 (63.8–73.8)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,451 65.7 1.9 (61.9–69.5)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,574 66.4 1.9 (62.7–70.1)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 302 72.5 3.2 (66.2–78.8)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,703 69.2 2.7 (63.9–74.5)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 267 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 641 74.0 2.4 (69.4–78.6)
Newport County, Rhode Island 361 84.2 2.5 (79.3–89.1)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,723 77.0 1.2 (74.7–79.3)
Washington County, Rhode Island 508 86.7 1.8 (83.2–90.2)
Aiken County, South Carolina 519 81.0 2.3 (76.6–85.4)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 630 79.6 2.5 (74.7–84.5)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 257 78.7 3.4 (72.1–85.3)
Charleston County, South Carolina 567 83.0 2.2 (78.7–87.3)
Greenville County, South Carolina 512 80.6 2.2 (76.2–85.0)
Horry County, South Carolina 693 78.7 2.5 (73.7–83.7)
Lexington County, South Carolina 319 82.2 3.0 (76.3–88.1)
Richland County, South Carolina 442 83.5 2.5 (78.6–88.4)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 655 70.7 2.2 (66.3–75.1)
Pennington County, South Dakota 742 68.4 2.1 (64.3–72.5)
Davidson County, Tennessee 269 84.2 2.8 (78.8–89.6)
Shelby County, Tennessee 288 89.8 2.8 (84.4–95.2)
Bexar County, Texas 393 87.0 2.5 (82.0–92.0)
Dallas County, Texas 386 92.5 1.9 (88.9–96.1)
El Paso County, Texas 520 92.4 1.5 (89.5–95.3)
Harris County, Texas 374 89.7 3.2 (83.3–96.1)
Lubbock County, Texas 542 89.5 1.8 (85.9–93.1)
Tarrant County, Texas 438 91.9 2.3 (87.4–96.4)
Travis County, Texas 311 90.3 2.2 (86.1–94.5)
Davis County, Utah 416 80.0 2.3 (75.5–84.5)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,658 81.3 1.3 (78.8–83.8)

TABLE 48. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported always using a seat belt when driving or
riding in a car, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 248 79.1 2.8 (73.5–84.7)
Tooele County, Utah 263 77.4 3.1 (71.3–83.5)
Utah County, Utah 541 77.2 2.6 (72.2–82.2)
Weber County, Utah 411 78.6 2.4 (73.8–83.4)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,483 83.2 1.3 (80.6–85.8)
Franklin County, Vermont 453 76.9 2.5 (72.0–81.8)
Orange County, Vermont 372 77.3 2.6 (72.1–82.5)
Rutland County, Vermont 691 80.7 1.8 (77.1–84.3)
Washington County, Vermont 714 77.5 2.0 (73.6–81.4)
Windsor County, Vermont 724 77.4 1.8 (73.8–81.0)
Asotin County, Washington 347 90.5 2.3 (86.1–94.9)
Benton County, Washington 362 91.5 1.9 (87.8–95.2)
Chelan County, Washington 532 92.6 1.3 (90.0–95.2)
Clark County, Washington 1,538 90.9 1.0 (89.0–92.8)
Douglas County, Washington 498 94.1 1.3 (91.5–96.7)
Franklin County, Washington 311 88.8 2.6 (83.7–93.9)
King County, Washington 3,230 93.3 0.6 (92.2–94.4)
Kitsap County, Washington 900 92.8 1.3 (90.2–95.4)
Pierce County, Washington 1,601 91.1 1.0 (89.0–93.2)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,528 90.5 1.2 (88.2–92.8)
Spokane County, Washington 1,182 93.1 1.1 (90.9–95.3)
Thurston County, Washington 1,534 91.5 1.0 (89.5–93.5)
Yakima County, Washington 737 92.2 1.5 (89.3–95.1)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 446 85.1 2.0 (81.2–89.0)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 922 70.5 2.6 (65.4–75.6)
Laramie County, Wyoming 710 75.6 2.0 (71.7–79.5)
Natrona County, Wyoming 599 64.8 2.3 (60.3–69.3)
Median 84.8
Range 58.0–94.1
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 49

TABLE 49. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 3,159 34.5 1.2 (32.1–36.9)
Alaska 2,041 38.0 1.5 (35.0–41.0)
Arizona 4,493 36.7 1.4 (33.9–39.5)
Arkansas 5,342 36.9 0.8 (35.3–38.5)
California 5,468 35.5 0.9 (33.8–37.2)
Colorado 5,825 36.7 0.8 (35.2–38.2)
Connecticut 7,968 38.2 0.7 (36.8–39.6)
Delaware 3,864 37.8 1.1 (35.6–40.0)
District of Columbia 3,827 32.1 1.0 (30.1–34.1)
Florida 10,287 36.5 0.7 (35.1–37.9)
Georgia 7,292 34.6 0.8 (33.0–36.2)
Hawaii 6,391 35.5 0.8 (33.9–37.1)
Idaho 5,091 35.6 0.9 (33.8–37.4)
Illinois 4,967 36.6 0.9 (34.9–38.3)
Indiana 6,252 35.0 0.8 (33.5–36.5)
Iowa 5,144 37.2 0.8 (35.6–38.8)
Kansas 7,967 36.4 0.7 (35.0–37.8)
Kentucky 5,907 38.4 1.0 (36.4–40.4)
Louisiana 6,619 35.9 0.8 (34.4–37.4)
Maine 3,833 36.6 1.0 (34.7–38.5)
Maryland 8,401 35.8 0.8 (34.3–37.3)
Massachusetts 11,890 35.2 0.7 (33.8–36.6)
Michigan 5,442 36.0 0.8 (34.4–37.6)
Minnesota 4,118 38.0 0.9 (36.2–39.8)
Mississippi 5,800 35.3 0.8 (33.7–36.9)
Missouri 5,251 35.7 1.1 (33.6–37.8)
Montana 5,741 38.1 0.9 (36.4–39.8)
Nebraska 7,617 37.0 0.8 (35.4–38.6)
Nevada 3,421 38.6 1.3 (36.1–41.1)
New Hampshire 5,698 38.3 0.8 (36.7–39.9)
New Jersey 12,482 37.3 0.6 (36.0–38.6)
New Mexico 6,330 36.9 0.8 (35.3–38.5)
New York 5,606 35.4 0.8 (33.7–37.1)
North Carolina 14,883 36.2 0.6 (35.1–37.3)
North Dakota 4,516 39.1 1.0 (37.2–41.0)
Ohio 5,605 35.5 1.3 (33.0–38.0)
Oklahoma 6,731 36.0 0.7 (34.5–37.5)
Oregon 4,626 35.9 0.9 (34.2–37.6)
Pennsylvania 12,606 37.3 0.9 (35.6–39.0)
Rhode Island 4,254 39.6 1.0 (37.6–41.6)
South Carolina 8,685 36.0 0.7 (34.6–37.4)
South Dakota 6,309 38.7 0.9 (37.0–40.4)
Tennessee 4,192 36.5 1.1 (34.3–38.7)
Texas 6,355 36.3 1.1 (34.1–38.5)
Utah 5,021 33.0 0.9 (31.2–34.8)
Vermont 6,774 34.8 0.7 (33.4–36.2)
Virginia 5,205 36.7 1.1 (34.5–38.9)
Washington 22,465 36.5 0.5 (35.6–37.4)
West Virginia 3,649 36.0 1.0 (34.1–37.9)
Wisconsin 4,608 36.8 0.9 (35.0–38.6)
Wyoming 4,744 38.1 0.9 (36.4–39.8)
Puerto Rico 4,375 39.4 0.9 (37.6–41.2)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,089 38.3 1.1 (36.2–40.4)
Median 36.5
Range 32.1–39.6
* Body mass index >25.0 and <30.0 kg/m2.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 50

TABLE 50. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area
(MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 706 33.9 3.3 (27.5–40.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,774 37.4 1.5 (34.5–40.3)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 761 39.4 4.0 (31.6–47.2)
Asheville, North Carolina 510 35.6 2.7 (30.3–40.9)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 2,938 34.9 1.2 (32.5–37.3)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 504 36.4 3.0 (30.5–42.3)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 886 37.0 2.1 (33.0–41.0)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 505 35.1 2.7 (29.8–40.4)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,025 35.2 1.1 (33.0–37.4)
Barre, Vermont 697 40.3 2.3 (35.7–44.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,134 33.8 1.8 (30.3–37.3)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 1,633 35.7 1.7 (32.3–39.1)
Billings, Montana 478 39.0 2.7 (33.7–44.3)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 865 33.1 2.1 (29.1–37.1)
Bismarck, North Dakota 538 36.2 2.4 (31.5–40.9)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,245 35.4 1.7 (32.1–38.7)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ķ 2,222 36.8 1.5 (33.9–39.7)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 867 38.0 2.0 (34.0–42.0)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,325 36.1 1.5 (33.2–39.0)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,984 35.1 1.3 (32.5–37.7)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 2,186 32.7 1.5 (29.8–35.6)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 1,677 35.2 1.6 (32.2–38.2)
Casper, Wyoming 585 38.7 2.3 (34.3–43.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 656 36.0 2.2 (31.6–40.4)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,021 34.0 1.8 (30.5–37.5)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,200 37.5 1.4 (34.8–40.2)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 683 40.6 2.3 (36.2–45.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,570 36.8 1.1 (34.6–39.0)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 954 31.4 3.0 (25.5–37.3)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 956 40.5 3.1 (34.5–46.5)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 771 35.0 2.0 (31.0–39.0)
Columbia, South Carolina 990 32.9 1.8 (29.3–36.5)
Concord, New Hampshire 591 38.3 2.5 (33.4–43.2)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 516 35.7 3.2 (29.4–42.0)
Dayton, Ohio 782 33.6 3.0 (27.8–39.4)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,702 36.4 1.1 (34.2–38.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 902 35.7 1.8 (32.1–39.3)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 801 32.1 2.1 (28.0–36.2)
Dover, Delaware 1,324 34.5 1.7 (31.3–37.7)
Durham, North Carolina 986 32.0 2.0 (28.2–35.8)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 2,744 37.9 1.3 (35.4–40.4)
El Paso, Texas 473 37.6 2.7 (32.3–42.9)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 1,656 38.7 2.1 (34.5–42.9)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 515 37.3 2.5 (32.4–42.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 691 38.4 3.3 (31.9–44.9)
Farmington, New Mexico 523 36.9 2.8 (31.5–42.3)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 536 40.8 2.8 (35.4–46.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 722 38.2 2.5 (33.4–43.0)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 473 43.2 3.6 (36.1–50.3)
Great Falls, Montana 496 37.2 2.6 (32.1–42.3)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 907 33.7 2.2 (29.4–38.0)
Greenville, South Carolina 799 36.3 2.1 (32.2–40.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 587 32.3 2.9 (26.6–38.0)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,517 38.8 1.2 (36.4–41.2)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 625 34.4 2.5 (29.4–39.4)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,374 34.8 1.6 (31.7–37.9)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 679 38.0 2.4 (33.2–42.8)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,917 35.7 1.1 (33.6–37.8)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 509 36.4 3.7 (29.1–43.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 484 31.4 3.3 (24.9–37.9)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 1,991 35.2 1.3 (32.6–37.8)
Jackson, Mississippi 988 37.3 1.9 (33.5–41.1)
Jacksonville, Florida 674 33.4 2.4 (28.7–38.1)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,457 35.7 1.8 (32.2–39.2)
Kalispell, Montana 480 40.1 2.8 (34.7–45.5)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,172 36.3 1.2 (33.9–38.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 643 34.8 2.3 (30.3–39.3)
Keene, New Hampshire 472 35.9 3.0 (30.1–41.7)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 639 36.2 2.5 (31.2–41.2)

TABLE 50. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight, by metropolitan and micropolitan
statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 509 38.7 2.6 (33.5–43.9)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,159 38.9 1.7 (35.5–42.3)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,521 36.7 1.7 (33.4–40.0)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 585 40.9 2.7 (35.7–46.1)
Lincoln, Nebraska 741 35.5 2.3 (31.0–40.0)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,188 39.4 1.8 (35.8–43.0)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 728 36.8 2.2 (32.5–41.1)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 887 41.9 2.2 (37.6–46.2)
Lubbock, Texas 545 35.8 2.7 (30.5–41.1)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,360 38.3 1.6 (35.2–41.4)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 802 30.5 2.4 (25.9–35.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,083 39.3 1.4 (36.6–42.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,311 37.1 2.1 (33.0–41.2)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,391 37.5 1.2 (35.2–39.8)
Missoula, Montana 480 40.2 2.9 (34.6–45.8)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 677 32.9 2.3 (28.4–37.4)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 610 39.0 2.6 (34.0–44.0)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 657 36.3 2.3 (31.8–40.8)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 3,113 37.0 1.3 (34.4–39.6)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,934 39.3 1.6 (36.2–42.4)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,392 36.8 1.7 (33.4–40.2)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 4,425 35.7 1.2 (33.4–38.0)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 562 41.7 2.5 (36.8–46.6)
Ocean City, New Jersey 526 39.5 2.8 (33.9–45.1)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 819 33.9 2.0 (30.0–37.8)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,088 35.1 1.3 (32.6–37.6)
Olympia, Washington 1,471 35.6 1.6 (32.6–38.6)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,672 36.9 1.5 (34.0–39.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 771 33.5 2.1 (29.4–37.6)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 2,527 34.6 1.7 (31.3–37.9)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,226 36.2 2.1 (32.2–40.2)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,481 37.5 1.8 (34.0–41.0)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,236 37.6 1.8 (34.1–41.1)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,622 36.9 1.1 (34.7–39.1)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,339 38.5 0.9 (36.7–40.3)
Provo-Orem, Utah 560 33.0 2.7 (27.8–38.2)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,136 39.1 2.2 (34.8–43.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 924 40.6 1.9 (36.8–44.4)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,188 38.0 1.7 (34.7–41.3)
Richmond, Virginia 828 37.7 2.2 (33.4–42.0)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 666 33.1 2.2 (28.8–37.4)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 1,566 39.7 1.6 (36.6–42.8)
Rutland, Vermont 671 34.6 2.1 (30.4–38.8)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,570 34.9 2.0 (31.0–38.8)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,120 33.2 1.3 (30.6–35.8)
San Antonio, Texas 510 36.6 2.8 (31.1–42.1)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 531 36.9 2.7 (31.7–42.1)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 725 34.4 2.4 (29.7–39.1)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 540 34.9 2.6 (29.8–40.0)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 545 35.3 2.4 (30.5–40.1)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,661 37.8 2.6 (32.7–42.9)
Seaford, Delaware 1,265 38.4 1.7 (35.0–41.8)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 4,548 36.0 0.9 (34.2–37.8)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 598 37.3 2.4 (32.5–42.1)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 850 41.2 2.0 (37.2–45.2)
Spokane, Washington 1,137 39.6 1.9 (35.8–43.4)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,549 36.4 2.1 (32.2–40.6)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,517 35.7 1.6 (32.6–38.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,060 35.8 1.9 (32.1–39.5)
Toledo, Ohio 763 44.6 4.0 (36.7–52.5)
Topeka, Kansas 711 39.5 2.3 (35.1–43.9)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 466 38.2 2.9 (32.5–43.9)
Tucson, Arizona 743 37.4 2.7 (32.0–42.8)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,809 35.1 1.5 (32.1–38.1)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,088 35.8 2.1 (31.6–40.0)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 1,166 35.9 1.7 (32.6–39.2)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 5,968 36.1 2.1 (32.0–40.2)
Wenatchee, Washington 979 37.3 2.0 (33.4–41.2)

TABLE 50. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight, by metropolitan and micropolitan
statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 1,753 37.6 1.5 (34.7–40.5)
Wilmington, North Carolina 655 37.0 2.6 (31.8–42.2)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 579 32.3 2.3 (27.7–36.9)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,607 35.1 1.8 (31.6–38.6)
Yakima, Washington 683 35.8 2.3 (31.2–40.4)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 890 37.9 4.2 (29.7–46.1)
Yuma, Arizona 466 40.3 3.0 (34.4–46.2)
Median 36.4
Range 30.5–44.6
* Body mass index >25.0 and <30.0 kg/m2.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 51

TABLE 51. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Jefferson County, Alabama 522 35.2 2.6 (30.0–40.4)
Maricopa County, Arizona 820 36.6 2.2 (32.3–40.9)
Pima County, Arizona 743 37.4 2.7 (32.0–42.8)
Pinal County, Arizona 406 32.2 3.9 (24.6–39.8)
Yuma County, Arizona 466 40.3 3.0 (34.4–46.2)
Benton County, Arkansas 359 35.8 2.9 (30.1–41.5)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 681 37.4 2.3 (33.0–41.8)
Washington County, Arkansas 311 36.4 3.3 (30.0–42.8)
Alameda County, California 268 37.7 3.6 (30.6–44.8)
Los Angeles County, California 728 36.8 2.2 (32.5–41.1)
Riverside County, California 342 37.9 3.3 (31.5–44.3)
San Bernardino County, California 324 31.5 3.0 (25.6–37.4)
San Diego County, California 531 36.9 2.7 (31.7–42.1)
Adams County, Colorado 408 41.6 3.0 (35.8–47.4)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 597 36.0 2.4 (31.2–40.8)
Denver County, Colorado 557 34.6 2.5 (29.7–39.5)
Douglas County, Colorado 286 37.9 3.3 (31.5–44.3)
El Paso County, Colorado 741 34.1 2.1 (30.1–38.1)
Jefferson County, Colorado 703 35.1 2.1 (30.9–39.3)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,325 36.1 1.5 (33.2–39.0)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,830 38.7 1.4 (35.9–41.5)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 343 38.6 3.1 (32.5–44.7)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,934 39.3 1.6 (36.2–42.4)
New London County, Connecticut 562 41.7 2.5 (36.8–46.6)
Tolland County, Connecticut 344 38.2 3.4 (31.5–44.9)
Kent County, Delaware 1,324 34.5 1.7 (31.3–37.7)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,275 38.4 1.7 (35.1–41.7)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,265 38.4 1.7 (35.0–41.8)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,827 32.2 1.0 (30.2–34.2)
Broward County, Florida 704 39.0 2.3 (34.5–43.5)
Duval County, Florida 289 30.2 3.2 (23.9–36.5)
Hillsborough County, Florida 466 33.9 2.7 (28.6–39.2)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 884 40.6 2.1 (36.5–44.7)
Orange County, Florida 416 31.0 2.7 (25.7–36.3)
Palm Beach County, Florida 495 38.3 2.7 (33.0–43.6)
Pinellas County, Florida 342 36.8 3.4 (30.1–43.5)
Clayton County, Georgia 357 37.3 3.5 (30.4–44.2)
Cobb County, Georgia 366 36.3 3.2 (30.0–42.6)
DeKalb County, Georgia 413 31.5 3.3 (25.0–38.0)
Fulton County, Georgia 409 31.6 3.0 (25.8–37.4)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 337 38.0 3.5 (31.2–44.8)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,374 34.8 1.6 (31.7–37.9)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,917 35.7 1.1 (33.6–37.8)
Kauai County, Hawaii 643 34.8 2.3 (30.3–39.3)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,457 35.7 1.8 (32.2–39.2)
Ada County, Idaho 626 35.8 2.4 (31.1–40.5)
Canyon County, Idaho 484 36.7 2.6 (31.7–41.7)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 253 42.1 3.5 (35.3–48.9)
Cook County, Illinois 1,617 37.5 1.5 (34.5–40.5)
DuPage County, Illinois 349 35.8 3.1 (29.7–41.9)
Lake County, Illinois 247 37.0 3.8 (29.6–44.4)
Lake County, Indiana 507 35.9 2.8 (30.5–41.3)
Marion County, Indiana 1,271 34.9 1.7 (31.6–38.2)
Polk County, Iowa 684 36.0 2.1 (31.9–40.1)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,388 34.0 1.5 (31.0–37.0)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,199 35.6 1.7 (32.2–39.0)
Shawnee County, Kansas 511 38.1 2.7 (32.8–43.4)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 324 37.3 3.4 (30.7–43.9)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 450 43.0 3.1 (37.0–49.0)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 383 38.3 3.1 (32.3–44.3)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 647 30.5 2.3 (26.0–35.0)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 606 40.1 2.5 (35.2–45.0)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 260 33.1 3.9 (25.4–40.8)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 375 33.1 3.0 (27.2–39.0)
Cumberland County, Maine 647 36.5 2.4 (31.9–41.1)
York County, Maine 445 39.3 2.7 (33.9–44.7)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 548 35.1 2.5 (30.3–39.9)
Baltimore County, Maryland 903 37.2 2.0 (33.2–41.2)
Carroll County, Maryland 240 42.3 3.8 (34.9–49.7)

TABLE 51. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 310 38.5 3.3 (32.0–45.0)
Charles County, Maryland 296 30.8 3.0 (24.8–36.8)
Frederick County, Maryland 548 39.9 2.7 (34.7–45.1)
Harford County, Maryland 275 32.6 3.3 (26.2–39.0)
Howard County, Maryland 297 33.5 3.2 (27.3–39.7)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,085 35.0 1.9 (31.2–38.8)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 624 40.2 2.6 (35.0–45.4)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 262 39.2 3.6 (32.2–46.2)
Washington County, Maryland 386 33.6 3.1 (27.5–39.7)
Baltimore city, Maryland 500 33.5 2.5 (28.6–38.4)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,085 35.6 2.0 (31.8–39.4)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,656 38.8 2.2 (34.5–43.1)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,255 35.8 2.4 (31.0–40.6)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,186 32.4 1.5 (29.5–35.3)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 598 38.0 2.6 (33.0–43.0)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 494 38.6 2.6 (33.4–43.8)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,130 36.1 2.2 (31.7–40.5)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,607 35.1 1.8 (31.6–38.6)
Macomb County, Michigan 366 37.1 3.2 (30.9–43.3)
Oakland County, Michigan 565 36.2 2.5 (31.3–41.1)
Wayne County, Michigan 801 32.1 2.1 (28.0–36.2)
Dakota County, Minnesota 281 39.2 3.4 (32.5–45.9)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 865 36.2 1.9 (32.4–40.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 404 36.7 2.8 (31.1–42.3)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 250 34.9 3.8 (27.4–42.4)
Hinds County, Mississippi 444 41.9 2.8 (36.4–47.4)
Rankin County, Mississippi 257 31.5 3.4 (24.8–38.2)
Jackson County, Missouri 512 37.8 2.7 (32.5–43.1)
St. Louis County, Missouri 346 34.3 3.9 (26.7–41.9)
St. Louis city, Missouri 588 39.2 3.7 (32.0–46.4)
Cascade County, Montana 496 37.2 2.6 (32.1–42.3)
Flathead County, Montana 480 40.1 2.8 (34.7–45.5)
Missoula County, Montana 480 40.2 2.9 (34.6–45.8)
Yellowstone County, Montana 435 40.4 2.8 (34.9–45.9)
Douglas County, Nebraska 945 37.7 1.9 (33.9–41.5)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 688 34.7 2.4 (30.0–39.4)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 279 33.8 3.3 (27.4–40.2)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 531 35.0 2.5 (30.2–39.8)
Clark County, Nevada 1,159 38.9 1.7 (35.5–42.3)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,171 38.0 1.7 (34.7–41.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 472 35.9 3.0 (30.1–41.7)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 450 39.0 2.9 (33.4–44.6)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,360 38.3 1.6 (35.2–41.4)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 591 38.3 2.5 (33.4–43.2)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 974 41.0 1.9 (37.3–44.7)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 592 38.4 2.5 (33.5–43.3)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 504 36.4 3.0 (30.5–42.3)
Bergen County, New Jersey 898 37.6 2.1 (33.5–41.7)
Burlington County, New Jersey 524 31.6 2.6 (26.6–36.6)
Camden County, New Jersey 603 37.7 2.7 (32.4–43.0)
Cape May County, New Jersey 526 39.5 2.8 (33.9–45.1)
Essex County, New Jersey 955 39.7 2.2 (35.3–44.1)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 550 37.3 2.6 (32.3–42.3)
Hudson County, New Jersey 785 38.7 2.5 (33.9–43.5)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 489 36.2 2.7 (31.0–41.4)
Mercer County, New Jersey 466 38.2 2.9 (32.5–43.9)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 747 38.7 2.5 (33.9–43.5)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 714 33.2 2.3 (28.7–37.7)
Morris County, New Jersey 662 37.5 2.5 (32.6–42.4)
Ocean County, New Jersey 734 42.1 2.4 (37.5–46.7)
Passaic County, New Jersey 823 36.1 2.6 (31.0–41.2)
Somerset County, New Jersey 549 37.0 2.6 (31.9–42.1)
Sussex County, New Jersey 518 35.6 2.7 (30.3–40.9)
Union County, New Jersey 464 39.1 2.9 (33.5–44.7)
Warren County, New Jersey 478 35.9 2.9 (30.1–41.7)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,131 38.0 1.7 (34.6–41.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 509 38.7 2.6 (33.5–43.9)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 361 40.7 3.5 (33.8–47.6)
San Juan County, New Mexico 523 36.9 2.8 (31.5–42.3)

TABLE 51. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 540 34.9 2.6 (29.8–40.0)
Kings County, New York 433 38.6 2.9 (32.8–44.4)
Nassau County, New York 332 37.0 3.1 (30.8–43.2)
New York County, New York 450 30.0 2.7 (24.7–35.3)
Queens County, New York 390 33.9 2.9 (28.1–39.7)
Suffolk County, New York 325 36.0 3.3 (29.6–42.4)
Westchester County, New York 241 36.8 4.0 (28.9–44.7)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 344 37.4 3.0 (31.4–43.4)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 367 35.0 3.0 (29.1–40.9)
Catawba County, North Carolina 385 36.3 3.1 (30.2–42.4)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 416 40.7 3.1 (34.6–46.8)
Durham County, North Carolina 381 33.8 3.0 (27.9–39.7)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 395 32.2 2.8 (26.6–37.8)
Gaston County, North Carolina 371 32.4 2.9 (26.6–38.2)
Guilford County, North Carolina 427 32.7 3.2 (26.4–39.0)
Johnston County, North Carolina 429 33.2 2.7 (27.8–38.6)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 802 37.2 2.1 (33.0–41.4)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 380 37.9 3.5 (31.0–44.8)
Orange County, North Carolina 350 28.2 3.1 (22.2–34.2)
Randolph County, North Carolina 371 37.2 3.0 (31.3–43.1)
Union County, North Carolina 374 37.3 3.4 (30.6–44.0)
Wake County, North Carolina 614 39.5 2.7 (34.2–44.8)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 384 34.6 2.8 (29.1–40.1)
Cass County, North Dakota 646 39.2 2.3 (34.6–43.8)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 406 42.0 4.3 (33.5–50.5)
Hamilton County, Ohio 365 23.6 4.2 (15.3–31.9)
Lorain County, Ohio 468 45.5 4.3 (37.1–53.9)
Lucas County, Ohio 703 41.8 2.6 (36.7–46.9)
Mahoning County, Ohio 800 41.5 3.0 (35.6–47.4)
Montgomery County, Ohio 729 33.5 2.4 (28.8–38.2)
Summit County, Ohio 671 30.6 2.6 (25.5–35.7)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 366 36.6 3.0 (30.7–42.5)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,220 31.8 1.6 (28.6–35.0)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,290 34.0 1.7 (30.7–37.3)
Clackamas County, Oregon 422 38.5 2.8 (32.9–44.1)
Lane County, Oregon 515 37.3 2.5 (32.4–42.2)
Multnomah County, Oregon 739 34.4 2.0 (30.4–38.4)
Washington County, Oregon 481 37.0 2.6 (31.8–42.2)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 490 38.0 2.6 (32.9–43.1)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,383 39.0 2.7 (33.7–44.3)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,512 38.3 2.0 (34.3–42.3)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 298 36.5 3.3 (30.0–43.0)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,684 36.7 2.8 (31.2–42.2)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 263 39.2 4.8 (29.8–48.6)
Kent County, Rhode Island 626 40.0 2.4 (35.3–44.7)
Newport County, Rhode Island 348 48.7 3.4 (42.0–55.4)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,606 39.7 1.3 (37.1–42.3)
Washington County, Rhode Island 487 34.5 2.6 (29.3–39.7)
Aiken County, South Carolina 517 37.3 2.6 (32.2–42.4)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 613 39.1 2.6 (34.0–44.2)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 248 30.7 3.4 (24.1–37.3)
Charleston County, South Carolina 564 36.8 2.6 (31.7–41.9)
Greenville County, South Carolina 497 38.2 2.5 (33.2–43.2)
Horry County, South Carolina 677 32.9 2.3 (28.4–37.4)
Lexington County, South Carolina 310 29.7 3.0 (23.9–35.5)
Richland County, South Carolina 427 34.2 2.8 (28.7–39.7)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 623 41.1 2.5 (36.3–45.9)
Pennington County, South Dakota 722 42.3 2.2 (37.9–46.7)
Davidson County, Tennessee 264 36.5 3.6 (29.4–43.6)
Shelby County, Tennessee 276 31.7 3.5 (24.8–38.6)
Bexar County, Texas 379 34.9 3.1 (28.8–41.0)
Dallas County, Texas 366 43.1 4.3 (34.6–51.6)
El Paso County, Texas 473 37.6 2.7 (32.3–42.9)
Harris County, Texas 357 36.6 4.7 (27.3–45.9)
Lubbock County, Texas 531 35.8 2.8 (30.4–41.2)
Tarrant County, Texas 424 43.1 3.9 (35.5–50.7)
Travis County, Texas 299 35.3 3.5 (28.5–42.1)
Davis County, Utah 405 35.7 2.6 (30.5–40.9)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,611 33.1 1.4 (30.4–35.8)

TABLE 51. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who are overweight,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 245 31.2 3.4 (24.5–37.9)
Tooele County, Utah 264 37.8 3.7 (30.6–45.0)
Utah County, Utah 531 32.7 2.7 (27.4–38.0)
Weber County, Utah 401 33.7 2.8 (28.3–39.1)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,445 35.1 1.6 (32.0–38.2)
Franklin County, Vermont 443 36.9 2.6 (31.8–42.0)
Orange County, Vermont 359 33.5 3.0 (27.6–39.4)
Rutland County, Vermont 671 34.6 2.1 (30.4–38.8)
Washington County, Vermont 697 40.3 2.3 (35.7–44.9)
Windsor County, Vermont 712 35.6 2.0 (31.6–39.6)
Asotin County, Washington 332 42.0 3.4 (35.4–48.6)
Benton County, Washington 350 35.2 3.1 (29.2–41.2)
Chelan County, Washington 506 36.1 2.8 (30.7–41.5)
Clark County, Washington 1,493 38.2 1.5 (35.2–41.2)
Douglas County, Washington 473 38.9 2.8 (33.4–44.4)
Franklin County, Washington 289 41.0 3.7 (33.7–48.3)
King County, Washington 3,091 35.7 1.0 (33.6–37.8)
Kitsap County, Washington 867 38.0 2.0 (34.0–42.0)
Pierce County, Washington 1,517 35.6 1.6 (32.5–38.7)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,457 37.7 1.6 (34.5–40.9)
Spokane County, Washington 1,137 39.6 1.9 (35.8–43.4)
Thurston County, Washington 1,471 35.6 1.6 (32.6–38.6)
Yakima County, Washington 683 35.8 2.3 (31.2–40.4)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 424 36.5 2.8 (31.1–41.9)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 944 34.6 2.6 (29.4–39.8)
Laramie County, Wyoming 683 40.6 2.3 (36.2–45.0)
Natrona County, Wyoming 585 38.7 2.3 (34.3–43.1)
Median 36.8
Range 23.6–48.7
* Body mass index >25.0 and <30.0 kg/m2.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
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Table 52

TABLE 52. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Alabama 3,136 31.1 1.1 (29.0–33.2)
Alaska 2,004 26.5 1.4 (23.8–29.2)
Arizona 4,441 23.1 1.3 (20.6–25.6)
Arkansas 5,279 27.2 0.7 (25.7–28.7)
California 5,388 23.6 0.8 (22.1–25.1)
Colorado 5,741 18.7 0.6 (17.5–19.9)
Connecticut 7,889 20.8 0.6 (19.6–22.0)
Delaware 3,795 26.5 1.0 (24.6–28.4)
District of Columbia 3,800 22.9 0.9 (21.2–24.6)
Florida 10,193 23.6 0.6 (22.4–24.8)
Georgia 7,202 28.0 0.8 (26.5–29.5)
Hawaii 6,317 21.0 0.7 (19.6–22.4)
Idaho 5,014 25.1 0.8 (23.6–26.6)
Illinois 4,888 25.8 0.8 (24.3–27.3)
Indiana 6,178 28.8 0.7 (27.4–30.2)
Iowa 5,074 26.5 0.7 (25.0–28.0)
Kansas 7,889 26.4 0.6 (25.2–27.6)
Kentucky 5,845 28.5 0.9 (26.7–30.3)
Louisiana 6,511 27.7 0.7 (26.3–29.1)
Maine 3,789 23.7 0.8 (22.1–25.3)
Maryland 8,304 25.6 0.7 (24.3–26.9)
Massachusetts 11,768 20.7 0.6 (19.5–21.9)
Michigan 5,353 29.5 0.8 (28.0–31.0)
Minnesota 4,082 25.1 0.8 (23.4–26.8)
Mississippi 5,722 31.9 0.8 (30.3–33.5)
Missouri 5,173 27.8 1.0 (25.9–29.7)
Montana 5,675 22.0 0.7 (20.6–23.4)
Nebraska 7,521 28.0 0.7 (26.6–29.4)
Nevada 3,364 25.5 1.1 (23.3–27.7)
New Hampshire 5,649 22.8 0.7 (21.4–24.2)
New Jersey 12,393 23.0 0.5 (22.0–24.0)
New Mexico 6,230 23.5 0.8 (22.0–25.0)
New York 5,548 23.3 0.7 (21.9–24.7)
North Carolina 14,730 27.1 0.5 (26.1–28.1)
North Dakota 4,468 25.8 0.8 (24.2–27.4)
Ohio 5,538 28.7 1.2 (26.3–31.1)
Oklahoma 6,638 29.2 0.7 (27.8–30.6)
Oregon 4,558 24.9 0.8 (23.4–26.4)
Pennsylvania 12,464 24.6 0.7 (23.2–26.0)
Rhode Island 4,216 21.9 0.8 (20.3–23.5)
South Carolina 8,603 30.0 0.7 (28.7–31.3)
South Dakota 6,254 26.0 0.7 (24.6–27.4)
Tennessee 4,140 29.5 1.1 (27.4–31.6)
Texas 6,289 26.9 1.0 (25.0–28.8)
Utah 4,927 22.9 0.8 (21.4–24.4)
Vermont 6,713 21.6 0.6 (20.4–22.8)
Virginia 5,142 25.9 1.0 (24.0–27.8)
Washington 22,173 24.9 0.4 (24.1–25.7)
West Virginia 3,620 31.5 0.9 (29.7–33.3)
Wisconsin 4,546 27.5 0.8 (25.8–29.2)
Wyoming 4,682 23.9 0.7 (22.4–25.4)
Puerto Rico 4,272 25.6 0.8 (24.0–27.2)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,035 26.9 1.0 (25.0–28.8)
Median 25.8
Range 18.7–31.9
* Body mass index >30.0 kg/m2.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
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Table 53

TABLE 53. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area
(MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 699 28.5 3.0 (22.7–34.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,747 22.0 1.4 (19.2–24.8)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 757 27.9 3.3 (21.4–34.4)
Asheville, North Carolina 506 21.3 2.4 (16.6–26.0)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 2,895 26.4 1.2 (24.1–28.7)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 503 25.5 2.4 (20.8–30.2)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 873 30.5 2.0 (26.6–34.4)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 499 24.8 2.4 (20.1–29.5)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 2,991 26.3 1.0 (24.3–28.3)
Barre, Vermont 692 18.2 1.7 (14.9–21.5)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,115 27.2 1.6 (24.0–30.4)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 1,609 17.9 1.3 (15.4–20.4)
Billings, Montana 473 26.5 2.4 (21.8–31.2)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 860 31.7 2.0 (27.8–35.6)
Bismarck, North Dakota 529 26.2 2.2 (21.9–30.5)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,230 23.9 1.4 (21.1–26.7)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 2,207 19.3 1.2 (17.0–21.6)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 859 27.1 1.9 (23.5–30.7)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,307 17.4 1.1 (15.2–19.6)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,961 19.2 1.0 (17.2–21.2)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 2,164 16.8 1.1 (14.6–19.0)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 1,661 26.8 1.4 (24.0–29.6)
Casper, Wyoming 577 24.0 2.1 (20.0–28.0)
Charleston, West Virginia 652 30.1 2.1 (25.9–34.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,008 29.6 1.8 (26.0–33.2)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,182 23.1 1.2 (20.8–25.4)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 672 24.5 2.0 (20.7–28.3)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,516 24.8 1.0 (22.9–26.7)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 940 27.6 3.0 (21.8–33.4)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 944 22.5 2.4 (17.8–27.2)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 762 20.1 1.7 (16.8–23.4)
Columbia, South Carolina 979 30.2 1.8 (26.7–33.7)
Concord, New Hampshire 586 22.8 2.1 (18.8–26.8)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 512 21.9 2.6 (16.8–27.0)
Dayton, Ohio 771 29.3 2.8 (23.7–34.9)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,661 19.8 0.9 (18.0–21.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 889 26.0 1.7 (22.6–29.4)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 790 35.0 2.2 (30.7–39.3)
Dover, Delaware 1,298 29.6 1.6 (26.4–32.8)
Durham, North Carolina 973 26.7 1.9 (23.1–30.3)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 2,725 21.8 1.0 (19.9–23.7)
El Paso, Texas 464 27.7 2.4 (23.0–32.4)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 1,634 20.9 1.6 (17.8–24.0)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 505 24.3 2.2 (20.0–28.6)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 680 20.9 2.7 (15.6–26.2)
Farmington, New Mexico 507 26.3 2.5 (21.4–31.2)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 532 31.1 2.5 (26.1–36.1)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 712 20.8 2.0 (16.9–24.7)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 469 24.1 3.2 (17.9–30.3)
Great Falls, Montana 491 24.4 2.4 (19.7–29.1)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 896 27.6 2.0 (23.7–31.5)
Greenville, South Carolina 791 25.6 2.0 (21.6–29.6)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 582 32.7 2.8 (27.2–38.2)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,495 21.1 1.0 (19.1–23.1)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 618 28.3 2.5 (23.4–33.2)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,362 21.3 1.5 (18.3–24.3)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 673 21.6 2.2 (17.3–25.9)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,882 21.0 1.0 (19.1–22.9)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 503 22.8 3.0 (16.9–28.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 482 45.5 4.3 (37.0–54.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 1,971 26.7 1.2 (24.3–29.1)
Jackson, Mississippi 978 29.3 1.7 (25.9–32.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 667 30.5 2.6 (25.5–35.5)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,437 20.9 1.5 (18.0–23.8)
Kalispell, Montana 477 16.6 2.1 (12.5–20.7)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,137 27.2 1.2 (24.9–29.5)
Kapaa, Hawaii 636 23.4 2.4 (18.8–28.0)
Keene, New Hampshire 469 23.3 2.4 (18.6–28.0)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 628 27.4 2.5 (22.4–32.4)

TABLE 53. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical
area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 500 25.9 2.4 (21.3–30.5)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,145 25.4 1.5 (22.4–28.4)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,510 22.6 1.4 (19.9–25.3)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 577 26.8 2.5 (21.9–31.7)
Lincoln, Nebraska 732 24.5 2.0 (20.6–28.4)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,179 26.4 1.5 (23.4–29.4)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 720 21.2 1.8 (17.6–24.8)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 882 25.4 1.8 (21.8–29.0)
Lubbock, Texas 539 28.5 2.6 (23.5–33.5)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,345 22.7 1.3 (20.1–25.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 793 34.1 2.8 (28.7–39.5)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,058 21.5 1.2 (19.2–23.8)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,295 26.2 1.8 (22.7–29.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,371 24.3 1.1 (22.1–26.5)
Missoula, Montana 474 15.0 2.2 (10.7–19.3)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 672 29.0 2.3 (24.4–33.6)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 607 28.7 2.3 (24.3–33.1)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 649 22.1 2.1 (18.0–26.2)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 3,092 22.3 1.1 (20.1–24.5)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,904 23.4 1.4 (20.7–26.1)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,375 26.1 1.6 (23.0–29.2)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 4,387 20.9 1.0 (19.0–22.8)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 557 20.3 2.0 (16.3–24.3)
Ocean City, New Jersey 522 23.9 2.3 (19.3–28.5)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 803 25.5 1.8 (21.9–29.1)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,057 27.9 1.2 (25.5–30.3)
Olympia, Washington 1,448 25.5 1.4 (22.8–28.2)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,644 28.5 1.3 (25.9–31.1)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 763 25.2 2.0 (21.4–29.0)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 2,497 22.4 1.5 (19.4–25.4)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,216 22.9 1.9 (19.2–26.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,451 25.2 1.7 (21.9–28.5)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,228 20.6 1.4 (17.9–23.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,564 24.2 1.0 (22.2–26.2)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,281 22.8 0.8 (21.3–24.3)
Provo-Orem, Utah 548 21.9 2.1 (17.9–25.9)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,126 25.1 1.7 (21.8–28.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 912 23.4 1.7 (20.1–26.7)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,164 24.2 1.5 (21.2–27.2)
Richmond, Virginia 823 25.8 2.1 (21.8–29.8)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 661 31.5 2.2 (27.1–35.9)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 1,554 22.1 1.3 (19.5–24.7)
Rutland, Vermont 665 23.4 1.9 (19.7–27.1)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,544 25.6 1.8 (22.1–29.1)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,081 22.2 1.1 (20.0–24.4)
San Antonio, Texas 504 31.9 2.8 (26.3–37.5)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 523 27.0 2.4 (22.3–31.7)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 721 18.8 2.0 (14.8–22.8)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 535 14.6 1.8 (11.0–18.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 537 31.3 2.5 (26.3–36.3)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,629 21.6 1.8 (18.0–25.2)
Seaford, Delaware 1,247 29.1 1.5 (26.1–32.1)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 4,484 21.5 0.8 (20.0–23.0)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 588 24.3 2.2 (20.0–28.6)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 847 23.9 1.7 (20.6–27.2)
Spokane, Washington 1,121 25.8 1.6 (22.6–29.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,536 25.7 2.0 (21.7–29.7)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,494 29.3 1.5 (26.4–32.2)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,048 23.9 1.6 (20.8–27.0)
Toledo, Ohio 753 21.5 2.9 (15.8–27.2)
Topeka, Kansas 706 26.3 1.9 (22.5–30.1)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 463 20.8 2.3 (16.3–25.3)
Tucson, Arizona 737 22.9 2.2 (18.5–27.3)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,781 29.0 1.4 (26.3–31.7)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,075 25.2 2.0 (21.3–29.1)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 1,142 27.1 1.6 (23.9–30.3)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 5,925 23.6 1.7 (20.2–27.0)
Wenatchee, Washington 966 23.9 1.8 (20.4–27.4)

TABLE 53. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical
area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,579 29.5 1.4 (26.7–32.3)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,722 26.5 1.3 (23.9–29.1)
Wilmington, North Carolina 653 24.7 2.5 (19.8–29.6)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 572 27.3 2.2 (23.0–31.6)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,583 25.5 1.7 (22.2–28.8)
Yakima, Washington 672 30.7 2.2 (26.3–35.1)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 881 29.7 4.3 (21.3–38.1)
Yuma, Arizona 458 30.5 3.0 (24.5–36.5)
Median 25.1
Range 14.6–45.5
* Body mass index >30.0 kg/m2.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 54

TABLE 54. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Jefferson County, Alabama 519 29.8 2.4 (25.2–34.4)
Maricopa County, Arizona 812 21.9 1.9 (18.1–25.7)
Pima County, Arizona 737 22.9 2.2 (18.5–27.3)
Pinal County, Arizona 404 NAķ NA —
Yuma County, Arizona 458 30.5 3.0 (24.5–36.5)
Benton County, Arkansas 351 23.5 2.6 (18.4–28.6)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 678 27.4 2.0 (23.4–31.4)
Washington County, Arkansas 310 19.8 2.7 (14.5–25.1)
Alameda County, California 267 21.5 3.0 (15.6–27.4)
Los Angeles County, California 720 21.2 1.8 (17.6–24.8)
Riverside County, California 339 29.1 3.1 (23.1–35.1)
San Bernardino County, California 322 32.7 3.1 (26.7–38.7)
San Diego County, California 523 27.0 2.4 (22.3–31.7)
Adams County, Colorado 399 25.0 2.4 (20.3–29.7)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 584 20.2 1.9 (16.4–24.0)
Denver County, Colorado 552 20.4 2.3 (16.0–24.8)
Douglas County, Colorado 281 14.7 2.5 (9.7–19.7)
El Paso County, Colorado 732 20.3 1.7 (17.0–23.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 695 19.9 1.8 (16.3–23.5)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,307 17.4 1.1 (15.2–19.6)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,811 21.0 1.2 (18.7–23.3)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 342 22.4 2.9 (16.8–28.0)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,904 23.4 1.4 (20.7–26.1)
New London County, Connecticut 557 20.3 2.0 (16.3–24.3)
Tolland County, Connecticut 342 22.2 3.1 (16.2–28.2)
Kent County, Delaware 1,298 29.6 1.6 (26.4–32.8)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,250 24.9 1.5 (22.0–27.8)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,247 29.1 1.5 (26.1–32.1)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,800 22.9 0.9 (21.2–24.6)
Broward County, Florida 692 21.8 2.0 (17.9–25.7)
Duval County, Florida 284 35.3 3.6 (28.3–42.3)
Hillsborough County, Florida 458 23.8 2.6 (18.8–28.8)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 874 22.2 1.8 (18.7–25.7)
Orange County, Florida 410 26.7 2.7 (21.3–32.1)
Palm Beach County, Florida 492 19.4 2.3 (14.9–23.9)
Pinellas County, Florida 340 25.2 2.9 (19.6–30.8)
Clayton County, Georgia 348 31.5 3.8 (24.0–39.0)
Cobb County, Georgia 359 19.4 2.6 (14.3–24.5)
DeKalb County, Georgia 409 24.7 3.3 (18.2–31.2)
Fulton County, Georgia 405 22.4 2.8 (16.9–27.9)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 332 23.3 2.8 (17.7–28.9)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,362 21.3 1.5 (18.3–24.3)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,882 21.0 1.0 (19.1–22.9)
Kauai County, Hawaii 636 23.4 2.4 (18.8–28.0)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,437 20.9 1.5 (18.0–23.8)
Ada County, Idaho 619 21.9 2.0 (18.1–25.7)
Canyon County, Idaho 477 26.4 2.3 (22.0–30.8)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 250 29.7 3.3 (23.2–36.2)
Cook County, Illinois 1,592 24.1 1.3 (21.5–26.7)
DuPage County, Illinois 344 18.2 2.4 (13.5–22.9)
Lake County, Illinois 242 26.3 3.4 (19.7–32.9)
Lake County, Indiana 499 31.9 2.6 (26.8–37.0)
Marion County, Indiana 1,261 27.3 1.5 (24.3–30.3)
Polk County, Iowa 672 23.9 1.9 (20.2–27.6)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,375 21.4 1.3 (18.8–24.0)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,187 28.7 1.6 (25.6–31.8)
Shawnee County, Kansas 508 27.3 2.3 (22.8–31.8)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 323 29.1 3.1 (23.1–35.1)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 446 24.2 2.7 (19.0–29.4)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 377 22.6 2.7 (17.2–28.0)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 635 29.7 2.3 (25.2–34.2)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 598 24.5 2.2 (20.1–28.9)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 258 23.0 3.6 (16.0–30.0)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 371 26.7 3.0 (20.9–32.5)
Cumberland County, Maine 645 17.4 1.7 (14.0–20.8)
York County, Maine 439 25.8 2.4 (21.1–30.5)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 543 26.9 2.4 (22.1–31.7)
Baltimore County, Maryland 893 24.9 1.7 (21.5–28.3)
Carroll County, Maryland 236 17.3 2.7 (12.0–22.6)

TABLE 54. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 305 28.6 3.1 (22.5–34.7)
Charles County, Maryland 294 36.9 3.4 (30.3–43.5)
Frederick County, Maryland 539 25.2 2.2 (20.8–29.6)
Harford County, Maryland 271 30.7 3.4 (24.1–37.3)
Howard County, Maryland 294 18.6 2.7 (13.3–23.9)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,070 16.4 1.5 (13.5–19.3)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 619 28.6 2.2 (24.2–33.0)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 260 22.9 3.2 (16.5–29.3)
Washington County, Maryland 384 28.7 3.0 (22.9–34.5)
Baltimore city, Maryland 494 31.6 2.5 (26.7–36.5)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,065 24.9 1.7 (21.5–28.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,634 21.3 1.7 (17.9–24.7)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,246 27.0 2.4 (22.3–31.7)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,164 16.7 1.1 (14.5–18.9)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 595 15.4 1.9 (11.6–19.2)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 491 19.4 2.2 (15.1–23.7)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,121 23.0 1.8 (19.5–26.5)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,583 25.5 1.7 (22.2–28.8)
Macomb County, Michigan 358 27.4 3.0 (21.6–33.2)
Oakland County, Michigan 555 27.6 2.4 (22.9–32.3)
Wayne County, Michigan 790 35.0 2.2 (30.7–39.3)
Dakota County, Minnesota 278 21.7 3.0 (15.8–27.6)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 857 20.9 1.7 (17.6–24.2)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 403 24.0 2.7 (18.7–29.3)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 246 30.4 3.7 (23.1–37.7)
Hinds County, Mississippi 438 29.5 2.6 (24.5–34.5)
Rankin County, Mississippi 254 29.2 3.2 (22.9–35.5)
Jackson County, Missouri 505 30.0 2.6 (25.0–35.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 342 22.7 3.4 (16.0–29.4)
St. Louis city, Missouri 581 30.9 3.9 (23.3–38.5)
Cascade County, Montana 491 24.4 2.4 (19.7–29.1)
Flathead County, Montana 477 16.6 2.1 (12.5–20.7)
Missoula County, Montana 474 15.0 2.2 (10.7–19.3)
Yellowstone County, Montana 430 26.5 2.5 (21.6–31.4)
Douglas County, Nebraska 930 26.5 1.7 (23.2–29.8)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 680 25.0 2.1 (20.8–29.2)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 271 32.8 3.2 (26.6–39.0)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 523 31.9 2.6 (26.8–37.0)
Clark County, Nevada 1,145 25.4 1.5 (22.4–28.4)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,147 24.0 1.5 (21.0–27.0)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 469 23.3 2.4 (18.6–28.0)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 448 21.8 2.5 (16.9–26.7)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,345 22.7 1.3 (20.1–25.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 586 22.8 2.1 (18.8–26.8)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 965 22.4 1.6 (19.2–25.6)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 589 22.8 2.1 (18.7–26.9)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 503 25.5 2.4 (20.8–30.2)
Bergen County, New Jersey 887 19.1 1.6 (16.0–22.2)
Burlington County, New Jersey 521 27.8 2.4 (23.1–32.5)
Camden County, New Jersey 599 26.3 2.5 (21.5–31.1)
Cape May County, New Jersey 522 23.9 2.3 (19.3–28.5)
Essex County, New Jersey 950 24.5 1.9 (20.8–28.2)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 541 25.8 2.3 (21.2–30.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 783 23.6 2.0 (19.6–27.6)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 483 20.1 2.6 (15.1–25.1)
Mercer County, New Jersey 463 20.8 2.3 (16.3–25.3)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 740 22.5 1.8 (18.9–26.1)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 709 20.8 2.0 (16.8–24.8)
Morris County, New Jersey 660 17.1 1.8 (13.5–20.7)
Ocean County, New Jersey 731 25.7 1.9 (21.9–29.5)
Passaic County, New Jersey 814 26.3 2.5 (21.4–31.2)
Somerset County, New Jersey 545 16.0 1.9 (12.4–19.6)
Sussex County, New Jersey 517 19.0 2.0 (15.1–22.9)
Union County, New Jersey 458 23.1 2.8 (17.7–28.5)
Warren County, New Jersey 476 28.3 2.9 (22.6–34.0)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,113 20.7 1.5 (17.7–23.7)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 500 25.9 2.4 (21.3–30.5)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 357 23.1 2.8 (17.7–28.5)
San Juan County, New Mexico 507 26.3 2.5 (21.4–31.2)

TABLE 54. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 535 14.6 1.8 (11.0–18.2)
Kings County, New York 429 21.8 2.3 (17.4–26.2)
Nassau County, New York 329 18.5 2.5 (13.6–23.4)
New York County, New York 447 17.6 2.6 (12.5–22.7)
Queens County, New York 385 21.2 2.6 (16.1–26.3)
Suffolk County, New York 320 26.4 3.3 (19.9–32.9)
Westchester County, New York 239 16.3 2.8 (10.9–21.7)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 340 19.4 2.6 (14.3–24.5)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 365 29.9 3.1 (23.9–35.9)
Catawba County, North Carolina 381 25.4 3.1 (19.4–31.4)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 413 29.9 2.8 (24.3–35.5)
Durham County, North Carolina 375 25.5 2.7 (20.3–30.7)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 392 26.4 2.7 (21.2–31.6)
Gaston County, North Carolina 368 29.4 3.0 (23.6–35.2)
Guilford County, North Carolina 422 26.7 2.7 (21.4–32.0)
Johnston County, North Carolina 425 31.9 2.9 (26.1–37.7)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 795 21.9 1.8 (18.4–25.4)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 380 24.5 3.3 (18.0–31.0)
Orange County, North Carolina 345 21.3 2.7 (16.1–26.5)
Randolph County, North Carolina 365 25.2 2.6 (20.1–30.3)
Union County, North Carolina 370 21.0 2.8 (15.5–26.5)
Wake County, North Carolina 609 24.6 2.1 (20.5–28.7)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 379 24.7 2.7 (19.4–30.0)
Cass County, North Dakota 635 21.9 1.9 (18.2–25.6)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 404 23.6 3.5 (16.7–30.5)
Hamilton County, Ohio 358 26.1 4.8 (16.8–35.4)
Lorain County, Ohio 458 22.8 2.6 (17.8–27.8)
Lucas County, Ohio 693 24.7 2.2 (20.4–29.0)
Mahoning County, Ohio 792 25.8 2.2 (21.5–30.1)
Montgomery County, Ohio 718 30.7 2.5 (25.8–35.6)
Summit County, Ohio 664 29.8 2.6 (24.7–34.9)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 362 23.5 2.6 (18.4–28.6)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,200 29.6 1.6 (26.4–32.8)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,273 27.7 1.5 (24.7–30.7)
Clackamas County, Oregon 410 25.9 2.6 (20.7–31.1)
Lane County, Oregon 505 24.3 2.2 (20.0–28.6)
Multnomah County, Oregon 729 22.6 1.8 (19.1–26.1)
Washington County, Oregon 474 21.5 2.2 (17.2–25.8)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 485 20.9 2.0 (16.9–24.9)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,363 26.9 1.7 (23.6–30.2)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,483 24.0 1.4 (21.3–26.7)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 297 20.0 2.7 (14.8–25.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,661 29.3 2.8 (23.8–34.8)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 262 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 620 23.9 2.1 (19.9–27.9)
Newport County, Rhode Island 345 12.3 2.0 (8.3–16.3)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,585 23.5 1.0 (21.4–25.6)
Washington County, Rhode Island 479 20.9 2.4 (16.2–25.6)
Aiken County, South Carolina 508 31.5 2.5 (26.6–36.4)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 607 20.4 2.3 (15.9–24.9)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 242 31.8 3.7 (24.6–39.0)
Charleston County, South Carolina 559 25.9 2.4 (21.2–30.6)
Greenville County, South Carolina 491 24.0 2.3 (19.4–28.6)
Horry County, South Carolina 672 29.0 2.3 (24.4–33.6)
Lexington County, South Carolina 305 29.3 3.1 (23.2–35.4)
Richland County, South Carolina 422 29.5 2.6 (24.4–34.6)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 622 24.4 2.0 (20.4–28.4)
Pennington County, South Dakota 716 22.5 1.9 (18.8–26.2)
Davidson County, Tennessee 263 30.0 3.4 (23.3–36.7)
Shelby County, Tennessee 274 31.4 3.8 (23.9–38.9)
Bexar County, Texas 375 34.1 3.3 (27.7–40.5)
Dallas County, Texas 364 20.0 3.0 (14.0–26.0)
El Paso County, Texas 464 27.7 2.4 (23.0–32.4)
Harris County, Texas 351 16.3 2.9 (10.6–22.0)
Lubbock County, Texas 525 28.0 2.6 (22.9–33.1)
Tarrant County, Texas 420 22.6 3.3 (16.1–29.1)
Travis County, Texas 295 23.8 3.0 (17.9–29.7)
Davis County, Utah 397 24.8 2.4 (20.0–29.6)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,582 22.2 1.2 (19.8–24.6)

TABLE 54. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >20 years who are obese, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 241 9.8 2.1 (5.6–14.0)
Tooele County, Utah 258 31.2 3.4 (24.6–37.8)
Utah County, Utah 519 22.0 2.1 (17.9–26.1)
Weber County, Utah 393 26.9 2.7 (21.7–32.1)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,428 16.4 1.1 (14.2–18.6)
Franklin County, Vermont 437 24.9 2.4 (20.1–29.7)
Orange County, Vermont 355 25.0 2.7 (19.6–30.4)
Rutland County, Vermont 665 23.4 1.9 (19.7–27.1)
Washington County, Vermont 692 18.2 1.7 (14.9–21.5)
Windsor County, Vermont 707 24.5 1.8 (20.9–28.1)
Asotin County, Washington 327 20.8 2.6 (15.8–25.8)
Benton County, Washington 343 27.1 3.1 (21.1–33.1)
Chelan County, Washington 499 23.9 2.5 (19.1–28.7)
Clark County, Washington 1,467 26.2 1.4 (23.5–28.9)
Douglas County, Washington 467 23.7 2.4 (19.1–28.3)
Franklin County, Washington 285 27.7 3.4 (21.0–34.4)
King County, Washington 3,050 19.7 0.9 (18.0–21.4)
Kitsap County, Washington 859 27.1 1.9 (23.5–30.7)
Pierce County, Washington 1,494 29.5 1.5 (26.6–32.4)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,434 27.1 1.4 (24.3–29.9)
Spokane County, Washington 1,121 25.8 1.6 (22.6–29.0)
Thurston County, Washington 1,448 25.5 1.4 (22.8–28.2)
Yakima County, Washington 672 30.7 2.2 (26.3–35.1)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 422 29.9 2.6 (24.7–35.1)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 934 30.0 2.4 (25.3–34.7)
Laramie County, Wyoming 672 24.5 2.0 (20.7–28.3)
Natrona County, Wyoming 577 24.0 2.1 (20.0–28.0)
Median 24.4
Range 9.8–36.9
* Body mass index >30.0 kg/m2.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 55

TABLE 55. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently have asthma,* by state/
territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Alabama 3,274 8.9 0.7 (7.6–10.2)
Alaska 2,100 9.5 0.8 (7.9–11.1)
Arizona 4,775 8.9 0.8 (7.4–10.4)
Arkansas 5,563 7.6 0.4 (6.8–8.4)
California 5,694 7.6 0.4 (6.8–8.4)
Colorado 6,067 7.9 0.4 (7.1–8.7)
Connecticut 8,444 9.3 0.4 (8.5–10.1)
Delaware 3,991 9.6 0.7 (8.2–11.0)
District of Columbia 4,002 10.0 0.7 (8.7–11.3)
Florida 10,661 7.2 0.4 (6.5–7.9)
Georgia 7,672 8.0 0.4 (7.1–8.9)
Hawaii 6,517 8.1 0.5 (7.2–9.0)
Idaho 5,295 9.2 0.5 (8.1–10.3)
Illinois 5,144 8.3 0.5 (7.3–9.3)
Indiana 6,497 8.4 0.4 (7.6–9.2)
Iowa 5,411 6.5 0.4 (5.7–7.3)
Kansas 8,267 8.3 0.4 (7.5–9.1)
Kentucky 6,147 8.2 0.5 (7.2–9.2)
Louisiana 7,044 5.9 0.3 (5.2–6.6)
Maine 3,999 9.7 0.6 (8.6–10.8)
Maryland 8,844 8.9 0.5 (8.0–9.8)
Massachusetts 12,643 9.9 0.4 (9.1–10.7)
Michigan 5,593 9.6 0.5 (8.6–10.6)
Minnesota 4,237 7.8 0.5 (6.8–8.8)
Mississippi 6,013 6.9 0.4 (6.1–7.7)
Missouri 5,371 8.6 0.6 (7.4–9.8)
Montana 6,019 8.3 0.5 (7.3–9.3)
Nebraska 7,928 7.5 0.5 (6.6–8.4)
Nevada 3,549 7.7 0.7 (6.4–9.0)
New Hampshire 5,998 9.7 0.5 (8.8–10.6)
New Jersey 13,366 7.6 0.3 (6.9–8.3)
New Mexico 6,553 8.5 0.5 (7.6–9.4)
New York 5,894 8.5 0.5 (7.6–9.4)
North Carolina 15,590 6.8 0.3 (6.3–7.3)
North Dakota 4,759 7.1 0.6 (6.0–8.2)
Ohio 5,768 9.8 0.8 (8.2–11.4)
Oklahoma 6,965 8.9 0.4 (8.1–9.7)
Oregon 4,825 9.8 0.5 (8.8–10.8)
Pennsylvania 13,155 8.8 0.5 (7.9–9.7)
Rhode Island 4,487 10.5 0.6 (9.3–11.7)
South Carolina 8,972 7.7 0.4 (6.9–8.5)
South Dakota 6,614 7.7 0.5 (6.8–8.6)
Tennessee 4,399 8.5 0.6 (7.3–9.7)
Texas 6,806 7.3 0.7 (6.0–8.6)
Utah 5,175 8.4 0.6 (7.3–9.5)
Vermont 6,972 9.3 0.4 (8.4–10.2)
Virginia 5,402 8.4 0.6 (7.2–9.6)
Washington 23,587 8.9 0.3 (8.4–9.4)
West Virginia 3,769 8.6 0.6 (7.5–9.7)
Wisconsin 4,815 8.8 0.6 (7.6–10.0)
Wyoming 4,961 8.7 0.5 (7.7–9.7)
Puerto Rico 4,674 8.3 0.5 (7.3–9.3)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,218 4.5 0.4 (3.6–5.4)
Median 8.4
Range 4.5–10.5
* Defined as ever having been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that they had asthma and reporting that they still have asthma.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 56

TABLE 56. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently* have asthma, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 728 7.4 1.5 (4.5–10.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,811 8.6 0.8 (7.1–10.1)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 807 10.6 2.1 (6.5–14.7)
Asheville, North Carolina 534 7.3 1.3 (4.7–9.9)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,103 7.7 0.7 (6.4–9.0)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 538 7.6 1.6 (4.5–10.7)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 918 7.9 1.2 (5.6–10.2)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 533 7.1 1.3 (4.6–9.6)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,179 8.6 0.7 (7.3–9.9)
Barre, Vermont 722 8.3 1.2 (5.9–10.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,200 5.3 0.7 (3.9–6.7)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 1,730 9.5 1.2 (7.1–11.9)
Billings, Montana 505 8.1 1.5 (5.1–11.1)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 897 8.2 1.2 (5.8–10.6)
Bismarck, North Dakota 573 7.4 1.3 (4.9–9.9)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,316 9.7 1.0 (7.7–11.7)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 2,340 8.6 1.0 (6.7–10.5)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 901 9.7 1.2 (7.3–12.1)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,448 8.7 0.8 (7.0–10.4)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,035 8.5 0.8 (7.0–10.0)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 2,336 9.0 0.8 (7.3–10.7)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 1,769 8.5 0.9 (6.8–10.2)
Casper, Wyoming 609 8.6 1.4 (5.8–11.4)
Charleston, West Virginia 679 8.2 1.6 (5.1–11.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,044 7.3 1.0 (5.3–9.3)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,295 5.3 0.5 (4.3–6.3)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 712 8.6 1.2 (6.2–11.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,706 8.3 0.6 (7.1–9.5)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 982 9.8 1.7 (6.5–13.1)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 985 9.9 2.1 (5.9–13.9)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 783 7.7 1.1 (5.5–9.9)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,022 7.0 1.0 (5.1–8.9)
Concord, New Hampshire 635 8.1 1.2 (5.7–10.5)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 544 4.5 1.2 (2.2–6.8)
Dayton, Ohio 803 8.8 1.8 (5.2–12.4)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,830 8.3 0.6 (7.0–9.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 954 5.9 0.8 (4.3–7.5)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 833 10.3 1.3 (7.7–12.9)
Dover, Delaware 1,372 10.3 1.1 (8.1–12.5)
Durham, North Carolina 1,026 6.1 0.9 (4.3–7.9)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 2,948 6.4 0.6 (5.3–7.5)
El Paso, Texas 531 5.1 1.1 (2.9–7.3)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 1,776 12.1 1.5 (9.1–15.1)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 532 9.1 1.4 (6.3–11.9)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 721 5.5 1.1 (3.3–7.7)
Farmington, New Mexico 541 8.4 1.6 (5.2–11.6)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 565 8.3 1.5 (5.3–11.3)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 759 10.7 1.9 (7.0–14.4)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 501 7.5 1.4 (4.8–10.2)
Great Falls, Montana 518 10.7 1.6 (7.5–13.9)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 947 6.5 1.0 (4.6–8.4)
Greenville, South Carolina 821 6.7 1.0 (4.7–8.7)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 611 7.7 1.8 (4.2–11.2)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,681 10.4 0.7 (8.9–11.9)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 650 6.0 1.2 (3.6–8.4)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,396 8.6 1.0 (6.7–10.5)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 699 8.0 1.5 (5.1–10.9)
Honolulu, Hawaii 2,987 7.9 0.6 (6.7–9.1)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 551 8.7 2.2 (4.4–13.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 502 8.4 1.9 (4.7–12.1)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,091 7.7 0.7 (6.4–9.0)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,032 7.1 1.0 (5.2–9.0)
Jacksonville, Florida 695 8.7 1.3 (6.1–11.3)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,484 8.4 1.0 (6.4–10.4)
Kalispell, Montana 501 6.6 1.4 (3.9–9.3)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,284 7.7 0.6 (6.5–8.9)
Kapaa, Hawaii 650 8.4 1.5 (5.5–11.3)
Keene, New Hampshire 499 9.3 1.6 (6.1–12.5)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 679 6.8 1.2 (4.4–9.2)

TABLE 56. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently have
asthma, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 538 10.0 1.6 (6.8–13.2)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,212 7.4 0.9 (5.6–9.2)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,582 9.7 1.0 (7.7–11.7)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 605 10.1 1.4 (7.4–12.8)
Lincoln, Nebraska 769 9.9 1.5 (7.0–12.8)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,232 8.1 0.9 (6.3–9.9)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 766 6.2 0.9 (4.3–8.1)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 919 7.7 1.0 (5.7–9.7)
Lubbock, Texas 574 9.0 1.4 (6.3–11.7)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,437 9.5 0.9 (7.7–11.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 841 7.8 1.7 (4.6–11.0)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,153 5.5 0.7 (4.1–6.9)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,362 8.8 1.5 (5.9–11.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,463 8.9 0.8 (7.4–10.4)
Missoula, Montana 505 9.2 1.5 (6.2–12.2)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 696 9.5 2.1 (5.4–13.6)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 631 6.8 1.1 (4.7–8.9)
Nassau-Suffolk, New Yorkķ 694 6.7 1.2 (4.4–9.0)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 3,346 6.9 0.7 (5.6–8.2)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,051 8.0 0.8 (6.5–9.5)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,469 6.3 0.9 (4.5–8.1)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 4,725 7.9 0.6 (6.7–9.1)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 597 9.9 1.5 (6.9–12.9)
Ocean City, New Jersey 551 7.7 1.4 (5.0–10.4)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 840 8.0 1.1 (5.8–10.2)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,158 9.7 0.7 (8.3–11.1)
Olympia, Washington 1,537 9.9 0.9 (8.1–11.7)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,742 8.9 1.0 (6.9–10.9)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 807 7.2 1.0 (5.2–9.2)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 2,618 10.5 1.1 (8.4–12.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,309 8.9 1.1 (6.8–11.0)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,638 8.8 1.1 (6.6–11.0)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,286 8.1 0.9 (6.3–9.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,771 10.9 0.8 (9.4–12.4)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,696 10.5 0.5 (9.5–11.5)
Provo-Orem, Utah 574 8.6 1.8 (5.2–12.0)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,200 5.4 0.8 (3.9–6.9)
Rapid City, South Dakota 965 8.9 1.2 (6.6–11.2)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,230 8.6 0.9 (6.7–10.5)
Richmond, Virginia 864 8.7 1.5 (5.8–11.6)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 704 8.2 1.2 (5.9–10.5)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 1,652 9.7 0.9 (7.9–11.5)
Rutland, Vermont 688 9.9 1.3 (7.4–12.4)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,599 8.2 1.2 (5.9–10.5)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,186 9.8 0.9 (8.0–11.6)
San Antonio, Texas 538 7.3 1.3 (4.8–9.8)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 548 7.1 1.3 (4.6–9.6)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 747 7.9 1.2 (5.5–10.3)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 554 8.9 1.4 (6.1–11.7)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 568 7.3 1.2 (4.9–9.7)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,769 6.7 1.0 (4.7–8.7)
Seaford, Delaware 1,312 9.1 0.9 (7.3–10.9)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 4,772 7.9 0.5 (6.9–8.9)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 640 5.9 1.1 (3.8–8.0)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 899 8.0 1.1 (5.8–10.2)
Spokane, Washington 1,188 9.9 1.1 (7.7–12.1)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,628 10.6 1.1 (8.4–12.8)
Tacoma, Washingtonķ 1,604 8.8 0.9 (7.0–10.6)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,084 9.1 1.1 (7.0–11.2)
Toledo, Ohio 783 9.8 2.2 (5.4–14.2)
Topeka, Kansas 754 8.7 1.3 (6.2–11.2)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 504 11.3 1.9 (7.6–15.0)
Tucson, Arizona 783 8.5 1.3 (5.9–11.1)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,875 7.6 0.8 (6.1–9.1)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,124 8.5 1.6 (5.4–11.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 1,203 8.0 1.0 (6.1–9.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 6,232 7.7 0.8 (6.1–9.3)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,033 9.6 1.1 (7.4–11.8)

TABLE 56. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently have
asthma, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,658 8.1 0.8 (6.5–9.7)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 1,812 9.7 0.9 (7.9–11.5)
Wilmington, North Carolina 677 7.3 1.2 (5.0–9.6)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 613 6.5 1.2 (4.2–8.8)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,737 10.2 1.0 (8.2–12.2)
Yakima, Washington 744 8.4 1.4 (5.7–11.1)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 916 6.6 1.8 (3.0–10.2)
Yuma, Arizona 509 9.9 1.7 (6.5–13.3)
Median 8.4
Range 4.5–12.1
* Defined as ever having been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that they had asthma and reporting that they still have asthma.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 57

TABLE 57. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently* have asthma, by
county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Jefferson County, Alabama 541 8.6 1.7 (5.4–11.8)
Maricopa County, Arizona 877 8.8 1.1 (6.6–11.0)
Pima County, Arizona 783 8.5 1.3 (5.9–11.1)
Pinal County, Arizona 432 10.8 2.1 (6.7–14.9)
Yuma County, Arizona 509 9.9 1.7 (6.5–13.3)
Benton County, Arkansas 379 10.5 2.1 (6.3–14.7)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 702 7.5 1.2 (5.2–9.8)
Washington County, Arkansas 325 7.1 1.7 (3.7–10.5)
Alameda County, California 272 7.6 1.7 (4.3–10.9)
Los Angeles County, California 766 6.2 0.9 (4.3–8.1)
Riverside County, California 357 8.2 1.6 (5.0–11.4)
San Bernardino County, California 347 7.9 1.6 (4.8–11.0)
San Diego County, California 548 7.1 1.3 (4.6–9.6)
Adams County, Colorado 432 7.8 1.4 (5.0–10.6)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 634 7.3 1.3 (4.8–9.8)
Denver County, Colorado 587 4.9 1.0 (3.0–6.8)
Douglas County, Colorado 295 9.2 2.0 (5.3–13.1)
El Paso County, Colorado 753 7.9 1.2 (5.6–10.2)
Jefferson County, Colorado 726 11.5 1.5 (8.6–14.4)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,448 8.7 0.8 (7.0–10.4)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,954 10.3 0.8 (8.7–11.9)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 363 8.0 1.7 (4.7–11.3)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,051 8.0 0.8 (6.5–9.5)
New London County, Connecticut 597 9.9 1.5 (6.9–12.9)
Tolland County, Connecticut 364 12.2 2.6 (7.1–17.3)
Kent County, Delaware 1,372 10.3 1.1 (8.1–12.5)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,307 9.6 1.1 (7.5–11.7)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,312 9.1 0.9 (7.3–10.9)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 4,002 10.0 0.7 (8.7–11.3)
Broward County, Florida 728 5.6 1.1 (3.5–7.7)
Duval County, Florida 297 9.5 1.9 (5.8–13.2)
Hillsborough County, Florida 480 9.9 1.6 (6.8–13.0)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 915 5.1 0.9 (3.4–6.8)
Orange County, Florida 433 6.7 1.4 (3.9–9.5)
Palm Beach County, Florida 510 5.9 1.6 (2.8–9.0)
Pinellas County, Florida 344 5.5 1.4 (2.7–8.3)
Clayton County, Georgia 381 8.8 1.8 (5.3–12.3)
Cobb County, Georgia 386 8.8 2.0 (5.0–12.6)
DeKalb County, Georgia 437 5.8 1.6 (2.7–8.9)
Fulton County, Georgia 422 6.4 1.2 (4.0–8.8)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 358 5.6 1.4 (2.8–8.4)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,396 8.6 1.0 (6.7–10.5)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 2,987 7.9 0.6 (6.7–9.1)
Kauai County, Hawaii 650 8.4 1.5 (5.5–11.3)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,484 8.4 1.0 (6.4–10.4)
Ada County, Idaho 651 10.1 1.6 (7.0–13.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 521 7.9 1.3 (5.3–10.5)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 257 9.4 1.9 (5.7–13.1)
Cook County, Illinois 1,674 8.5 0.9 (6.8–10.2)
DuPage County, Illinois 371 5.2 1.1 (3.0–7.4)
Lake County, Illinois 261 10.5 2.4 (5.8–15.2)
Lake County, Indiana 519 6.8 1.3 (4.2–9.4)
Marion County, Indiana 1,337 8.2 0.9 (6.5–9.9)
Polk County, Iowa 723 6.1 0.9 (4.2–8.0)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,443 8.6 0.9 (6.8–10.4)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,248 8.6 0.9 (6.7–10.5)
Shawnee County, Kansas 549 9.3 1.5 (6.4–12.2)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 342 8.6 1.9 (4.9–12.3)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 470 7.9 1.5 (4.9–10.9)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 411 5.6 1.5 (2.6–8.6)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 684 6.1 1.1 (4.0–8.2)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 639 5.8 1.1 (3.6–8.0)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 277 8.4 3.1 (2.3–14.5)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 395 7.8 1.9 (4.1–11.5)
Cumberland County, Maine 670 7.9 1.2 (5.5–10.3)
York County, Maine 466 8.6 1.4 (5.8–11.4)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 576 7.0 1.2 (4.6–9.4)
Baltimore County, Maryland 946 10.7 1.5 (7.8–13.6)
Carroll County, Maryland 252 13.1 2.5 (8.2–18.0)

TABLE 57. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently have
asthma, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 321 8.9 1.8 (5.4–12.4)
Charles County, Maryland 307 7.4 1.6 (4.2–10.6)
Frederick County, Maryland 584 8.4 2.0 (4.4–12.4)
Harford County, Maryland 291 6.8 1.9 (3.1–10.5)
Howard County, Maryland 321 4.0 1.5 (1.1–6.9)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,146 9.8 1.3 (7.2–12.4)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 658 10.1 1.4 (7.4–12.8)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 273 5.5 1.5 (2.6–8.4)
Washington County, Maryland 402 7.0 1.5 (4.1–9.9)
Baltimore city, Maryland 520 9.3 1.4 (6.5–12.1)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,209 10.8 1.1 (8.7–12.9)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,776 12.1 1.6 (8.9–15.3)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,315 11.3 1.3 (8.8–13.8)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,336 8.9 0.8 (7.3–10.5)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 627 7.6 1.5 (4.6–10.6)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 522 7.8 1.4 (5.0–10.6)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,191 9.7 1.2 (7.3–12.1)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,737 10.2 1.0 (8.2–12.2)
Macomb County, Michigan 376 8.6 2.0 (4.7–12.5)
Oakland County, Michigan 588 7.6 1.3 (5.1–10.1)
Wayne County, Michigan 833 10.3 1.3 (7.7–12.9)
Dakota County, Minnesota 294 10.5 2.4 (5.8–15.2)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 881 8.8 1.2 (6.4–11.2)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 413 10.4 1.9 (6.7–14.1)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 258 6.2 1.7 (2.9–9.5)
Hinds County, Mississippi 457 6.2 1.3 (3.6–8.8)
Rankin County, Mississippi 273 7.6 1.9 (3.9–11.3)
Jackson County, Missouri 523 7.4 1.4 (4.7–10.1)
St. Louis County, Missouri 350 7.5 2.2 (3.1–11.9)
St. Louis city, Missouri 602 12.4 2.1 (8.2–16.6)
Cascade County, Montana 518 10.7 1.6 (7.5–13.9)
Flathead County, Montana 501 6.6 1.4 (3.9–9.3)
Missoula County, Montana 505 9.2 1.5 (6.2–12.2)
Yellowstone County, Montana 460 8.1 1.6 (4.9–11.3)
Douglas County, Nebraska 982 8.8 1.2 (6.4–11.2)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 715 10.1 1.6 (7.0–13.2)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 293 8.5 1.7 (5.1–11.9)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 554 7.5 1.3 (5.0–10.0)
Clark County, Nevada 1,212 7.4 0.9 (5.6–9.2)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,213 8.7 1.0 (6.8–10.6)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 499 9.3 1.6 (6.1–12.5)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 467 7.7 1.4 (5.0–10.4)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,437 9.5 0.9 (7.7–11.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 635 8.1 1.2 (5.7–10.5)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,022 10.5 1.2 (8.2–12.8)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 630 9.1 1.3 (6.5–11.7)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 538 7.6 1.6 (4.5–10.7)
Bergen County, New Jersey 958 7.3 1.0 (5.4–9.2)
Burlington County, New Jersey 550 8.9 1.6 (5.9–11.9)
Camden County, New Jersey 639 8.8 1.4 (6.0–11.6)
Cape May County, New Jersey 551 7.7 1.4 (5.0–10.4)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,042 8.2 1.1 (6.0–10.4)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 580 6.8 1.3 (4.3–9.3)
Hudson County, New Jersey 847 8.9 1.4 (6.1–11.7)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 522 6.3 1.4 (3.5–9.1)
Mercer County, New Jersey 504 11.3 1.9 (7.6–15.0)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 825 7.1 1.1 (5.0–9.2)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 757 7.6 1.3 (5.0–10.2)
Morris County, New Jersey 705 4.9 1.0 (2.9–6.9)
Ocean County, New Jersey 792 6.9 1.0 (4.9–8.9)
Passaic County, New Jersey 889 6.0 1.1 (3.8–8.2)
Somerset County, New Jersey 574 3.0 0.7 (1.7–4.3)
Sussex County, New Jersey 555 6.7 1.2 (4.4–9.0)
Union County, New Jersey 493 6.1 1.4 (3.3–8.9)
Warren County, New Jersey 513 10.1 1.9 (6.4–13.8)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,154 8.5 0.9 (6.6–10.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 538 10.0 1.6 (6.8–13.2)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 367 8.4 2.1 (4.2–12.6)
San Juan County, New Mexico 541 8.4 1.6 (5.2–11.6)

TABLE 57. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently have
asthma, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 554 8.9 1.4 (6.1–11.7)
Kings County, New York 466 6.4 1.1 (4.2–8.6)
Nassau County, New York 347 7.7 1.7 (4.4–11.0)
New York County, New York 465 8.8 1.7 (5.5–12.1)
Queens County, New York 418 6.9 1.6 (3.8–10.0)
Suffolk County, New York 347 5.3 1.5 (2.3–8.3)
Westchester County, New York 257 5.9 1.7 (2.6–9.2)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 357 9.0 1.7 (5.7–12.3)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 388 6.2 1.6 (3.2–9.2)
Catawba County, North Carolina 401 4.8 1.6 (1.6–8.0)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 442 8.5 1.7 (5.1–11.9)
Durham County, North Carolina 399 5.9 1.3 (3.3–8.5)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 421 6.6 1.5 (3.6–9.6)
Gaston County, North Carolina 390 7.5 1.6 (4.4–10.6)
Guilford County, North Carolina 445 6.7 1.4 (4.0–9.4)
Johnston County, North Carolina 452 6.4 1.4 (3.7–9.1)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 832 4.6 0.7 (3.2–6.0)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 393 6.6 1.6 (3.4–9.8)
Orange County, North Carolina 363 6.3 1.7 (3.0–9.6)
Randolph County, North Carolina 389 6.8 1.5 (3.8–9.8)
Union County, North Carolina 390 5.2 1.2 (2.8–7.6)
Wake County, North Carolina 651 5.5 1.0 (3.6–7.4)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 406 7.0 1.5 (4.1–9.9)
Cass County, North Dakota 673 7.7 1.5 (4.7–10.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 421 9.1 2.7 (3.9–14.3)
Hamilton County, Ohio 372 9.2 2.5 (4.3–14.1)
Lorain County, Ohio 482 13.8 5.0 (3.9–23.7)
Lucas County, Ohio 722 11.9 1.8 (8.4–15.4)
Mahoning County, Ohio 823 7.3 1.3 (4.8–9.8)
Montgomery County, Ohio 749 8.4 1.4 (5.7–11.1)
Summit County, Ohio 692 9.4 1.8 (5.9–12.9)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 372 9.1 1.5 (6.1–12.1)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,272 9.0 0.9 (7.2–10.8)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,346 7.7 0.9 (5.9–9.5)
Clackamas County, Oregon 451 8.8 1.6 (5.7–11.9)
Lane County, Oregon 532 9.1 1.4 (6.3–11.9)
Multnomah County, Oregon 766 13.0 1.5 (10.0–16.0)
Washington County, Oregon 499 10.1 1.7 (6.7–13.5)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 511 7.7 1.3 (5.1–10.3)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,484 8.3 1.4 (5.5–11.1)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,614 7.4 0.8 (5.8–9.0)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 306 8.0 1.9 (4.2–11.8)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,749 12.7 1.8 (9.1–16.3)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 282 8.7 2.6 (3.7–13.7)
Kent County, Rhode Island 648 11.5 1.6 (8.3–14.7)
Newport County, Rhode Island 366 8.9 2.1 (4.8–13.0)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,770 11.2 0.8 (9.6–12.8)
Washington County, Rhode Island 515 8.6 1.3 (6.0–11.2)
Aiken County, South Carolina 531 7.9 1.5 (4.9–10.9)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 631 7.9 1.6 (4.7–11.1)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 258 5.9 1.8 (2.3–9.5)
Charleston County, South Carolina 573 7.9 1.5 (5.0–10.8)
Greenville County, South Carolina 513 6.4 1.1 (4.2–8.6)
Horry County, South Carolina 696 9.5 2.1 (5.4–13.6)
Lexington County, South Carolina 318 7.9 1.7 (4.7–11.1)
Richland County, South Carolina 439 6.8 1.4 (4.0–9.6)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 660 9.0 1.5 (6.1–11.9)
Pennington County, South Dakota 754 8.3 1.2 (5.9–10.7)
Davidson County, Tennessee 276 6.3 1.6 (3.2–9.4)
Shelby County, Tennessee 295 6.8 1.9 (3.1–10.5)
Bexar County, Texas 402 7.5 1.5 (4.7–10.3)
Dallas County, Texas 392 4.5 1.2 (2.2–6.8)
El Paso County, Texas 531 5.1 1.1 (2.9–7.3)
Harris County, Texas 384 8.1 2.7 (2.9–13.3)
Lubbock County, Texas 559 8.9 1.4 (6.2–11.6)
Tarrant County, Texas 448 7.6 1.6 (4.5–10.7)
Travis County, Texas 317 8.0 1.9 (4.4–11.6)
Davis County, Utah 413 7.2 1.4 (4.4–10.0)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,668 10.1 1.0 (8.2–12.0)

TABLE 57. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years told by a health professional that they currently have
asthma, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 250 8.6 1.9 (4.8–12.4)
Tooele County, Utah 268 6.6 1.8 (3.0–10.2)
Utah County, Utah 545 8.7 1.8 (5.2–12.2)
Weber County, Utah 413 8.7 1.6 (5.7–11.7)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,483 7.9 0.9 (6.2–9.6)
Franklin County, Vermont 456 9.2 1.6 (6.1–12.3)
Orange County, Vermont 378 8.1 1.6 (4.9–11.3)
Rutland County, Vermont 688 9.9 1.3 (7.4–12.4)
Washington County, Vermont 722 8.3 1.2 (5.9–10.7)
Windsor County, Vermont 737 11.1 1.3 (8.6–13.6)
Asotin County, Washington 348 11.5 2.0 (7.6–15.4)
Benton County, Washington 361 6.6 1.5 (3.7–9.5)
Chelan County, Washington 535 10.3 1.6 (7.2–13.4)
Clark County, Washington 1,549 9.0 0.9 (7.3–10.7)
Douglas County, Washington 498 8.6 1.5 (5.7–11.5)
Franklin County, Washington 318 7.3 1.6 (4.2–10.4)
King County, Washington 3,236 7.8 0.6 (6.7–8.9)
Kitsap County, Washington 901 9.7 1.2 (7.3–12.1)
Pierce County, Washington 1,604 9.0 0.9 (7.2–10.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,536 8.9 0.9 (7.1–10.7)
Spokane County, Washington 1,188 9.9 1.1 (7.7–12.1)
Thurston County, Washington 1,537 9.9 0.9 (8.1–11.7)
Yakima County, Washington 744 8.4 1.4 (5.7–11.1)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 443 8.0 1.7 (4.6–11.4)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 986 8.0 1.3 (5.4–10.6)
Laramie County, Wyoming 712 8.6 1.2 (6.2–11.0)
Natrona County, Wyoming 609 8.6 1.4 (5.8–11.4)
Median 8.3
Range 3.0–13.8
* Defined as ever having been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that they had asthma and reporting that they still have asthma.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 58

TABLE 58. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have diabetes, by
state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 3,292 10.0 0.6 (8.9–11.1)
Alaska 2,111 5.9 0.7 (4.6–7.2)
Arizona 4,809 8.5 0.7 (7.1–9.9)
Arkansas 5,590 8.1 0.4 (7.3–8.9)
California 5,704 8.2 0.5 (7.3–9.1)
Colorado 6,102 5.3 0.3 (4.7–5.9)
Connecticut 8,489 6.4 0.3 (5.8–7.0)
Delaware 4,001 8.1 0.5 (7.1–9.1)
District of Columbia 4,017 8.1 0.5 (7.1–9.1)
Florida 10,715 8.5 0.4 (7.8–9.2)
Georgia 7,699 9.1 0.4 (8.3–9.9)
Hawaii 6,553 8.2 0.4 (7.3–9.1)
Idaho 5,339 6.8 0.4 (6.0–7.6)
Illinois 5,178 8.1 0.5 (7.2–9.0)
Indiana 6,538 8.1 0.4 (7.4–8.8)
Iowa 5,435 7.3 0.4 (6.6–8.0)
Kansas 8,299 7.3 0.3 (6.7–7.9)
Kentucky 6,170 9.9 0.5 (8.9–10.9)
Louisiana 7,064 9.2 0.4 (8.5–9.9)
Maine 4,038 6.9 0.4 (6.1–7.7)
Maryland 8,900 7.9 0.4 (7.2–8.6)
Massachusetts 12,710 6.4 0.3 (5.9–6.9)
Michigan 5,654 9.0 0.4 (8.2–9.8)
Minnesota 4,247 5.7 0.4 (5.0–6.4)
Mississippi 6,032 10.9 0.5 (10.0–11.8)
Missouri 5,390 7.4 0.5 (6.5–8.3)
Montana 6,051 6.4 0.3 (5.7–7.1)
Nebraska 7,961 7.4 0.3 (6.7–8.1)
Nevada 3,584 7.5 0.6 (6.4–8.6)
New Hampshire 6,037 7.4 0.4 (6.6–8.2)
New Jersey 13,432 7.5 0.3 (7.0–8.0)
New Mexico 6,577 7.3 0.4 (6.6–8.0)
New York 5,924 7.6 0.4 (6.9–8.3)
North Carolina 15,632 9.1 0.3 (8.6–9.6)
North Dakota 4,776 6.7 0.4 (5.9–7.5)
Ohio 5,830 6.7 0.5 (5.7–7.7)
Oklahoma 7,014 10.0 0.4 (9.2–10.8)
Oregon 4,861 6.7 0.4 (6.0–7.4)
Pennsylvania 13,247 8.5 0.4 (7.7–9.3)
Rhode Island 4,512 7.4 0.4 (6.5–8.3)
South Carolina 9,027 9.6 0.4 (8.9–10.3)
South Dakota 6,647 6.5 0.3 (5.9–7.1)
Tennessee 4,412 10.7 0.6 (9.5–11.9)
Texas 6,845 8.0 0.5 (7.1–8.9)
Utah 5,203 5.7 0.4 (5.0–6.4)
Vermont 7,013 5.9 0.3 (5.3–6.5)
Virginia 5,443 7.4 0.5 (6.3–8.5)
Washington 23,723 7.1 0.2 (6.7–7.5)
West Virginia 3,788 12.1 0.6 (11.0–13.2)
Wisconsin 4,830 6.2 0.4 (5.5–6.9)
Wyoming 4,991 6.4 0.4 (5.7–7.1)
Puerto Rico 4,678 11.9 0.5 (10.9–12.9)
U.S.Virgin Islands 3,226 9.0 0.6 (7.9–10.1)
Median 7.5
Range 5.3–12.1
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 59

TABLE 59. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have diabetes, by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 734 8.0 1.6 (4.9–11.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,821 6.4 0.6 (5.2–7.6)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 815 9.2 2.3 (4.8–13.6)
Asheville, North Carolina 536 7.8 1.2 (5.4–10.2)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 3,111 7.5 0.6 (6.4–8.6)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 538 9.1 1.4 (6.4–11.8)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 924 8.8 1.0 (6.9–10.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 535 6.7 1.2 (4.3–9.1)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 3,209 8.3 0.6 (7.2–9.4)
Barre, Vermont 725 6.7 1.0 (4.7–8.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,206 7.3 0.7 (5.9–8.7)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 1,739 5.4 0.6 (4.1–6.7)
Billings, Montana 507 4.6 1.0 (2.7–6.5)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 898 10.4 1.1 (8.3–12.5)
Bismarck, North Dakota 577 6.0 1.0 (4.0–8.0)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 1,323 6.5 0.7 (5.0–8.0)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 2,350 7.5 0.7 (6.1–8.9)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 905 8.0 1.0 (6.1–9.9)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,463 5.9 0.6 (4.7–7.1)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 2,048 4.5 0.4 (3.7–5.3)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,348 5.6 0.5 (4.5–6.7)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,781 8.0 0.7 (6.6–9.4)
Casper, Wyoming 610 7.6 1.1 (5.5–9.7)
Charleston, West Virginia 684 11.5 1.3 (9.0–14.0)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,053 7.8 0.8 (6.2–9.4)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,299 7.7 0.6 (6.5–8.9)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 717 7.2 1.0 (5.3–9.1)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,733 7.6 0.6 (6.5–8.7)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 988 4.3 0.8 (2.6–6.0)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 999 6.3 1.1 (4.2–8.4)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 788 4.9 0.8 (3.4–6.4)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,033 9.8 1.0 (7.8–11.8)
Concord, New Hampshire 640 8.3 1.3 (5.8–10.8)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 547 5.3 1.3 (2.8–7.8)
Dayton, Ohio 810 7.3 1.4 (4.6–10.0)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 2,844 5.4 0.4 (4.6–6.2)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 960 6.1 0.8 (4.6–7.6)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 838 12.3 1.3 (9.7–14.9)
Dover, Delaware 1,376 9.7 0.9 (8.0–11.4)
Durham, North Carolina 1,027 6.8 0.9 (5.1–8.5)
Edison, New Jersey§ 2,970 7.0 0.5 (6.0–8.0)
El Paso, Texas 538 9.7 1.4 (7.0–12.4)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 1,782 5.9 0.8 (4.4–7.4)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 533 6.2 1.0 (4.2–8.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 723 4.9 1.1 (2.8–7.0)
Farmington, New Mexico 542 6.3 1.2 (3.9–8.7)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 567 9.9 1.4 (7.2–12.6)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 763 5.8 0.8 (4.1–7.5)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 504 8.2 2.1 (4.2–12.2)
Great Falls, Montana 520 7.6 1.2 (5.2–10.0)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 951 9.1 1.1 (7.0–11.2)
Greenville, South Carolina 822 6.7 0.9 (5.0–8.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 618 10.3 1.3 (7.7–12.9)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,693 6.2 0.5 (5.2–7.2)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 653 10.5 1.5 (7.6–13.4)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,406 7.1 0.7 (5.7–8.5)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 704 7.6 1.0 (5.7–9.5)
Honolulu, Hawaii 3,002 8.2 0.6 (7.1–9.3)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 553 5.8 1.5 (2.9–8.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 504 12.7 2.0 (8.7–16.7)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 2,099 7.0 0.6 (5.9–8.1)
Jackson, Mississippi 1,035 8.9 0.9 (7.1–10.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 699 9.4 1.4 (6.6–12.2)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 1,489 8.5 1.0 (6.6–10.4)
Kalispell, Montana 504 3.8 0.9 (2.0–5.6)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,292 6.5 0.5 (5.4–7.6)
Kapaa, Hawaii 656 10.8 1.4 (8.0–13.6)
Keene, New Hampshire 499 7.6 1.2 (5.2–10.0)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 682 7.3 1.1 (5.1–9.5)

TABLE 59. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have
diabetes, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 538 7.2 1.1 (5.0–9.4)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 1,226 7.7 0.8 (6.2–9.2)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,589 6.9 0.7 (5.6–8.2)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 608 7.8 1.1 (5.6–10.0)
Lincoln, Nebraska 775 6.2 0.9 (4.5–7.9)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 1,234 7.7 0.8 (6.2–9.2)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 768 9.8 1.3 (7.2–12.4)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 922 9.8 1.1 (7.6–12.0)
Lubbock, Texas 575 6.2 1.0 (4.2–8.2)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,449 6.7 0.7 (5.3–8.1)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 842 9.3 1.3 (6.8–11.8)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 2,165 7.8 0.7 (6.5–9.1)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,367 4.6 0.7 (3.2–6.0)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,468 4.9 0.4 (4.0–5.8)
Missoula, Montana 508 4.7 0.8 (3.1–6.3)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 704 8.7 1.1 (6.6–10.8)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 633 9.6 1.3 (7.0–12.2)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 694 7.9 1.1 (5.8–10.0)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,350 7.3 0.6 (6.2–8.4)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,062 7.9 0.7 (6.5–9.3)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 1,469 8.5 0.9 (6.8–10.2)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 4,754 7.3 0.5 (6.3–8.3)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 600 5.9 0.9 (4.1–7.7)
Ocean City, New Jersey 554 9.4 1.2 (7.0–11.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 847 5.8 0.8 (4.2–7.4)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,182 9.1 0.7 (7.8–10.4)
Olympia, Washington 1,545 6.7 0.7 (5.4–8.0)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,749 8.2 0.7 (6.9–9.5)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 810 8.1 1.0 (6.2–10.0)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 2,634 7.2 0.8 (5.6–8.8)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,317 8.7 1.0 (6.7–10.7)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,662 8.0 0.9 (6.3–9.7)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 1,293 6.4 0.7 (5.0–7.8)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 3,799 5.9 0.5 (4.9–6.9)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,737 7.4 0.4 (6.6–8.2)
Provo-Orem, Utah 578 3.9 0.7 (2.5–5.3)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 1,203 7.4 1.0 (5.5–9.3)
Rapid City, South Dakota 970 5.4 0.7 (4.0–6.8)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 1,245 7.5 0.9 (5.8–9.2)
Richmond, Virginia 870 7.5 0.9 (5.6–9.4)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 704 7.9 1.2 (5.5–10.3)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,659 7.2 0.8 (5.6–8.8)
Rutland, Vermont 695 6.6 1.0 (4.7–8.5)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,607 6.9 0.9 (5.2–8.6)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,200 6.3 0.6 (5.1–7.5)
San Antonio, Texas 539 8.9 1.2 (6.5–11.3)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 548 6.8 1.2 (4.5–9.1)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 750 5.8 1.0 (3.9–7.7)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 557 5.1 1.2 (2.8–7.4)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 571 9.2 1.3 (6.7–11.7)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 2,785 8.0 1.2 (5.7–10.3)
Seaford, Delaware 1,316 9.3 0.9 (7.6–11.0)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,797 6.8 0.4 (5.9–7.7)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 641 9.0 1.3 (6.5–11.5)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 904 6.5 0.9 (4.7–8.3)
Spokane, Washington 1,194 8.7 0.9 (6.9–10.5)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,642 7.1 0.8 (5.5–8.7)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,619 7.5 0.7 (6.2–8.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,094 9.5 1.0 (7.5–11.5)
Toledo, Ohio 794 6.5 1.0 (4.6–8.4)
Topeka, Kansas 757 8.7 1.0 (6.7–10.7)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 509 7.0 1.2 (4.7–9.3)
Tucson, Arizona 787 8.6 1.3 (6.1–11.1)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,881 10.4 0.8 (8.8–12.0)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,131 6.0 0.8 (4.5–7.5)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,217 7.4 0.8 (5.8–9.0)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginia§ 6,258 8.4 1.5 (5.6–11.2)
Wenatchee, Washington 1,043 6.6 0.9 (4.8–8.4)

TABLE 59. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have
diabetes, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,660 8.5 0.8 (6.9–10.1)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,815 7.1 0.6 (5.8–8.4)
Wilmington, North Carolina 678 8.2 1.2 (5.8–10.6)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 615 8.7 1.2 (6.3–11.1)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,741 6.9 0.7 (5.5–8.3)
Yakima, Washington 749 10.1 1.3 (7.6–12.6)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 929 11.2 2.1 (7.0–15.4)
Yuma, Arizona 514 9.9 1.5 (7.0–12.8)
Median 7.5
Range 3.8–12.7
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
Return to top.
Table 60

TABLE 60. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have diabetes, by
county —Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 542 12.3 1.6 (9.2–15.4)
Maricopa County, Arizona 882 8.8 1.1 (6.7–10.9)
Pima County, Arizona 787 8.6 1.3 (6.1–11.1)
Pinal County, Arizona 435 7.0 1.3 (4.4–9.6)
Yuma County, Arizona 514 9.9 1.5 (7.0–12.8)
Benton County, Arkansas 381 7.4 1.5 (4.5–10.3)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 702 7.6 1.1 (5.5–9.7)
Washington County, Arkansas 327 6.5 1.6 (3.3–9.7)
Alameda County, California 275 4.4 1.1 (2.3–6.5)
Los Angeles County, California 768 9.8 1.3 (7.2–12.4)
Riverside County, California 357 7.7 1.5 (4.8–10.6)
San Bernardino County, California 347 6.1 1.4 (3.4–8.8)
San Diego County, California 548 6.8 1.2 (4.5–9.1)
Adams County, Colorado 435 8.0 1.3 (5.4–10.6)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 635 5.0 0.9 (3.3–6.7)
Denver County, Colorado 590 4.8 0.8 (3.2–6.4)
Douglas County, Colorado 298 5.3 1.6 (2.2–8.4)
El Paso County, Colorado 758 4.7 0.8 (3.2–6.2)
Jefferson County, Colorado 730 5.5 0.9 (3.8–7.2)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,463 5.9 0.6 (4.7–7.1)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,965 6.2 0.6 (5.1–7.3)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 363 5.7 1.3 (3.1–8.3)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,062 7.9 0.7 (6.5–9.3)
New London County, Connecticut 600 5.9 0.9 (4.1–7.7)
Tolland County, Connecticut 365 7.2 1.7 (4.0–10.4)
Kent County, Delaware 1,376 9.7 0.9 (8.0–11.4)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,309 7.2 0.8 (5.7–8.7)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,316 9.3 0.9 (7.6–11.0)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 4,017 8.1 0.5 (7.1–9.1)
Broward County, Florida 728 6.9 1.1 (4.8–9.0)
Duval County, Florida 300 10.8 2.0 (7.0–14.6)
Hillsborough County, Florida 483 10.6 1.7 (7.2–14.0)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 921 8.6 1.1 (6.5–10.7)
Orange County, Florida 433 8.9 1.4 (6.2–11.6)
Palm Beach County, Florida 516 7.5 1.3 (5.0–10.0)
Pinellas County, Florida 347 6.1 1.3 (3.6–8.6)
Clayton County, Georgia 380 10.6 1.7 (7.3–13.9)
Cobb County, Georgia 389 5.2 1.0 (3.1–7.3)
DeKalb County, Georgia 438 6.5 1.4 (3.8–9.2)
Fulton County, Georgia 422 6.5 1.5 (3.6–9.4)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 359 6.0 1.4 (3.3–8.7)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,406 7.1 0.7 (5.7–8.5)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 3,002 8.2 0.6 (7.1–9.3)
Kauai County, Hawaii 656 10.8 1.4 (8.0–13.6)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,489 8.5 1.0 (6.6–10.4)
Ada County, Idaho 656 6.1 1.1 (4.0–8.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 522 6.8 1.2 (4.4–9.2)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 258 7.6 1.6 (4.4–10.8)
Cook County, Illinois 1,688 8.3 0.8 (6.6–10.0)
DuPage County, Illinois 373 4.5 1.1 (2.4–6.6)
Lake County, Illinois 262 4.6 1.4 (1.8–7.4)
Lake County, Indiana 525 10.0 1.4 (7.2–12.8)
Marion County, Indiana 1,345 8.5 0.8 (6.9–10.1)
Polk County, Iowa 728 6.3 0.9 (4.5–8.1)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,445 4.6 0.6 (3.4–5.8)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,250 8.9 0.9 (7.1–10.7)
Shawnee County, Kansas 552 8.4 1.2 (6.0–10.8)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 345 9.2 1.9 (5.6–12.8)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 471 10.6 1.7 (7.2–14.0)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 413 7.8 1.3 (5.3–10.3)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 688 6.3 0.9 (4.5–8.1)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 639 8.0 1.4 (5.3–10.7)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 276 8.1 2.0 (4.2–12.0)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 397 7.6 1.3 (5.0–10.2)
Cumberland County, Maine 674 5.7 0.9 (3.9–7.5)
York County, Maine 469 7.7 1.3 (5.1–10.3)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 583 8.7 1.4 (6.0–11.4)
Baltimore County, Maryland 951 8.0 0.9 (6.2–9.8)
Carroll County, Maryland 256 4.3 1.1 (2.1–6.5)

TABLE 60. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have
diabetes, by county —Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 322 7.8 1.6 (4.7–10.9)
Charles County, Maryland 307 7.0 1.6 (3.9–10.1)
Frederick County, Maryland 587 6.1 1.1 (4.0–8.2)
Harford County, Maryland 292 7.7 1.6 (4.5–10.9)
Howard County, Maryland 323 6.3 1.6 (3.1–9.5)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,152 5.2 0.8 (3.7–6.7)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 660 9.9 1.4 (7.2–12.6)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 275 6.4 1.6 (3.3–9.5)
Washington County, Maryland 406 11.0 1.7 (7.6–14.4)
Baltimore city, Maryland 529 9.7 1.4 (6.9–12.5)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,225 7.4 1.0 (5.5–9.3)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,782 5.3 0.7 (4.0–6.6)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,328 7.7 1.0 (5.8–9.6)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 2,348 5.5 0.5 (4.5–6.5)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 631 5.2 0.9 (3.5–6.9)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 524 8.2 1.4 (5.4–11.0)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,195 7.7 0.8 (6.1–9.3)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,741 6.9 0.7 (5.5–8.3)
Macomb County, Michigan 381 6.8 1.3 (4.2–9.4)
Oakland County, Michigan 594 6.9 1.1 (4.7–9.1)
Wayne County, Michigan 838 12.3 1.3 (9.7–14.9)
Dakota County, Minnesota 292 5.0 1.2 (2.7–7.3)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 886 4.9 0.8 (3.3–6.5)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 414 4.5 0.9 (2.7–6.3)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 258 10.6 2.3 (6.0–15.2)
Hinds County, Mississippi 461 9.4 1.4 (6.6–12.2)
Rankin County, Mississippi 273 6.5 1.4 (3.7–9.3)
Jackson County, Missouri 524 8.7 1.4 (6.0–11.4)
St. Louis County, Missouri 351 5.9 1.7 (2.5–9.3)
St. Louis city, Missouri 605 10.5 2.3 (5.9–15.1)
Cascade County, Montana 520 7.6 1.2 (5.2–10.0)
Flathead County, Montana 504 3.8 0.9 (2.0–5.6)
Missoula County, Montana 508 4.7 0.8 (3.1–6.3)
Yellowstone County, Montana 462 4.7 1.0 (2.7–6.7)
Douglas County, Nebraska 985 7.6 0.8 (6.0–9.2)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 721 6.1 0.9 (4.3–7.9)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 292 9.4 1.7 (6.0–12.8)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 557 9.3 1.3 (6.7–11.9)
Clark County, Nevada 1,226 7.7 0.8 (6.2–9.2)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,228 7.6 0.9 (5.9–9.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 499 7.6 1.2 (5.2–10.0)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 471 7.3 1.3 (4.7–9.9)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,449 6.7 0.7 (5.3–8.1)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 640 8.3 1.3 (5.8–10.8)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,026 7.1 1.0 (5.2–9.0)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 633 7.1 1.0 (5.2–9.0)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 538 9.1 1.4 (6.4–11.8)
Bergen County, New Jersey 964 6.1 0.8 (4.5–7.7)
Burlington County, New Jersey 553 8.3 1.2 (6.0–10.6)
Camden County, New Jersey 645 7.7 1.1 (5.5–9.9)
Cape May County, New Jersey 554 9.4 1.2 (7.0–11.8)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,043 7.8 0.9 (6.0–9.6)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 583 8.6 1.4 (5.9–11.3)
Hudson County, New Jersey 851 9.1 1.3 (6.5–11.7)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 521 5.8 1.1 (3.7–7.9)
Mercer County, New Jersey 509 7.0 1.2 (4.7–9.3)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 828 7.9 1.1 (5.7–10.1)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 762 4.9 0.8 (3.4–6.4)
Morris County, New Jersey 707 6.4 1.0 (4.4–8.4)
Ocean County, New Jersey 797 9.7 1.2 (7.4–12.0)
Passaic County, New Jersey 896 8.2 1.3 (5.7–10.7)
Somerset County, New Jersey 583 3.7 0.8 (2.2–5.2)
Sussex County, New Jersey 557 7.2 1.2 (4.9–9.5)
Union County, New Jersey 493 7.7 1.2 (5.3–10.1)
Warren County, New Jersey 515 8.2 1.4 (5.4–11.0)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,161 5.9 0.7 (4.5–7.3)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 538 7.2 1.1 (5.0–9.4)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 369 8.8 2.0 (4.8–12.8)
San Juan County, New Mexico 542 6.3 1.2 (3.9–8.7)

TABLE 60. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have
diabetes, by county —Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 557 5.1 1.2 (2.8–7.4)
Kings County, New York 468 8.3 1.3 (5.7–10.9)
Nassau County, New York 346 6.4 1.4 (3.6–9.2)
New York County, New York 467 4.4 1.0 (2.4–6.4)
Queens County, New York 421 7.6 1.5 (4.7–10.5)
Suffolk County, New York 348 9.3 1.6 (6.1–12.5)
Westchester County, New York 260 7.3 1.6 (4.2–10.4)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 359 7.8 1.5 (4.9–10.7)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 385 10.7 2.2 (6.5–14.9)
Catawba County, North Carolina 402 8.1 1.3 (5.5–10.7)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 444 9.3 1.5 (6.3–12.3)
Durham County, North Carolina 399 5.3 1.2 (2.9–7.7)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 422 8.5 1.6 (5.3–11.7)
Gaston County, North Carolina 390 12.9 2.0 (8.9–16.9)
Guilford County, North Carolina 449 8.6 1.4 (5.9–11.3)
Johnston County, North Carolina 451 7.7 1.4 (5.0–10.4)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 834 6.0 0.8 (4.4–7.6)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 394 9.2 1.8 (5.7–12.7)
Orange County, North Carolina 365 6.7 1.4 (4.0–9.4)
Randolph County, North Carolina 389 7.9 1.4 (5.1–10.7)
Union County, North Carolina 392 6.8 1.5 (3.8–9.8)
Wake County, North Carolina 653 6.5 1.1 (4.3–8.7)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 410 5.7 1.2 (3.3–8.1)
Cass County, North Dakota 675 5.8 1.0 (3.9–7.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 424 6.9 1.7 (3.7–10.1)
Hamilton County, Ohio 378 3.8 1.4 (1.0–6.6)
Lorain County, Ohio 490 8.9 1.9 (5.2–12.6)
Lucas County, Ohio 732 9.6 1.3 (7.0–12.2)
Mahoning County, Ohio 834 10.6 1.3 (8.1–13.1)
Montgomery County, Ohio 756 7.9 1.1 (5.8–10.0)
Summit County, Ohio 698 10.0 1.9 (6.3–13.7)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 377 7.5 1.4 (4.8–10.2)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,286 9.4 0.9 (7.7–11.1)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,350 9.4 0.9 (7.7–11.1)
Clackamas County, Oregon 451 3.6 0.8 (2.1–5.1)
Lane County, Oregon 533 6.2 1.0 (4.2–8.2)
Multnomah County, Oregon 776 5.5 0.8 (3.8–7.2)
Washington County, Oregon 506 6.1 1.1 (3.9–8.3)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 516 7.0 1.2 (4.7–9.3)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 2,502 9.5 0.7 (8.0–11.0)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 2,629 8.9 1.1 (6.7–11.1)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 308 5.9 1.3 (3.3–8.5)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,763 8.8 1.5 (5.9–11.7)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 282 8.5 2.2 (4.2–12.8)
Kent County, Rhode Island 652 7.4 1.1 (5.3–9.5)
Newport County, Rhode Island 367 6.1 1.3 (3.6–8.6)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,781 8.2 0.6 (6.9–9.5)
Washington County, Rhode Island 519 7.0 1.3 (4.4–9.6)
Aiken County, South Carolina 535 9.7 1.4 (6.9–12.5)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 634 6.5 0.9 (4.7–8.3)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 260 7.7 1.6 (4.6–10.8)
Charleston County, South Carolina 579 7.0 1.0 (4.9–9.1)
Greenville County, South Carolina 514 6.5 1.1 (4.4–8.6)
Horry County, South Carolina 704 8.7 1.1 (6.6–10.8)
Lexington County, South Carolina 322 10.9 1.8 (7.3–14.5)
Richland County, South Carolina 445 8.2 1.5 (5.3–11.1)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 664 7.7 1.2 (5.3–10.1)
Pennington County, South Dakota 758 5.8 0.8 (4.2–7.4)
Davidson County, Tennessee 277 10.3 2.0 (6.4–14.2)
Shelby County, Tennessee 295 8.0 1.7 (4.7–11.3)
Bexar County, Texas 404 9.3 1.4 (6.5–12.1)
Dallas County, Texas 394 4.4 1.0 (2.5–6.3)
El Paso County, Texas 538 9.7 1.4 (7.0–12.4)
Harris County, Texas 386 4.8 1.4 (2.0–7.6)
Lubbock County, Texas 560 5.8 1.0 (3.8–7.8)
Tarrant County, Texas 451 6.4 2.0 (2.4–10.4)
Travis County, Texas 317 7.0 1.5 (4.0–10.0)
Davis County, Utah 416 4.8 1.1 (2.7–6.9)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,677 6.3 0.7 (5.0–7.6)

TABLE 60. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >18 years who reported ever been told by a doctor that they have
diabetes, by county —Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 253 2.4 1.1 (0.3–4.5)
Tooele County, Utah 270 9.4 1.9 (5.7–13.1)
Utah County, Utah 549 3.9 0.7 (2.5–5.3)
Weber County, Utah 417 7.0 1.3 (4.5–9.5)
Chittenden County, Vermont 1,492 4.5 0.5 (3.5–5.5)
Franklin County, Vermont 459 5.5 1.0 (3.5–7.5)
Orange County, Vermont 379 7.4 1.5 (4.5–10.3)
Rutland County, Vermont 695 6.6 0.9 (4.7–8.5)
Washington County, Vermont 725 6.7 1.0 (4.7–8.7)
Windsor County, Vermont 739 6.8 0.9 (5.0–8.6)
Asotin County, Washington 350 8.4 1.6 (5.3–11.5)
Benton County, Washington 365 7.8 1.4 (5.0–10.6)
Chelan County, Washington 539 6.1 1.2 (3.8–8.4)
Clark County, Washington 1,557 6.6 0.6 (5.3–7.9)
Douglas County, Washington 504 7.2 1.3 (4.6–9.8)
Franklin County, Washington 317 6.4 1.4 (3.7–9.1)
King County, Washington 3,255 6.4 0.4 (5.5–7.3)
Kitsap County, Washington 905 8.0 1.0 (6.1–9.9)
Pierce County, Washington 1,619 7.6 0.7 (6.3–8.9)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,542 6.7 0.7 (5.4–8.0)
Spokane County, Washington 1,194 8.7 0.9 (6.9–10.5)
Thurston County, Washington 1,545 6.7 0.7 (5.4–8.0)
Yakima County, Washington 749 10.1 1.2 (7.7–12.5)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 446 11.0 1.6 (7.9–14.1)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 988 5.0 0.9 (3.3–6.7)
Laramie County, Wyoming 717 7.2 1.0 (5.3–9.1)
Natrona County, Wyoming 610 7.6 1.1 (5.5–9.7)
Median 7.4
Range 2.4–12.9
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 61

TABLE 61. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,* by state/
territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Alabama 2,242 15.6 0.9 (13.8–17.4)
Alaska 1,138 9.0 1.1 (6.8–11.2)
Arizona 3,279 12.5 0.9 (10.7–14.3)
Arkansas 3,808 14.9 0.7 (13.6–16.2)
California 3,539 10.5 0.7 (9.2–11.8)
Colorado 3,750 8.7 0.5 (7.7–9.7)
Connecticut 5,612 10.0 0.5 (9.1–10.9)
Delaware 2,591 12.1 0.8 (10.5–13.7)
District of Columbia 2,294 9.9 0.8 (8.3–11.5)
Florida 7,448 12.7 0.5 (11.7–13.7)
Georgia 4,900 12.1 0.6 (11.0–13.2)
Hawaii 4,276 8.7 0.5 (7.6–9.8)
Idaho 3,297 10.2 0.6 (9.0–11.4)
Illinois 3,361 11.6 0.7 (10.3–12.9)
Indiana 4,125 13.8 0.6 (12.6–15.0)
Iowa 3,585 12.0 0.6 (10.8–13.2)
Kansas 5,568 11.5 0.5 (10.6–12.4)
Kentucky 4,293 16.7 0.8 (15.1–18.3)
Louisiana 4,422 13.1 0.6 (11.9–14.3)
Maine 2,685 10.9 0.7 (9.5–12.3)
Maryland 5,814 12.2 0.6 (11.1–13.3)
Massachusetts 7,963 10.8 0.5 (9.9–11.7)
Michigan 3,856 13.9 0.7 (12.6–15.2)
Minnesota 2,786 10.4 0.6 (9.2–11.6)
Mississippi 4,070 13.8 0.6 (12.6–15.0)
Missouri 3,590 14.5 0.9 (12.7–16.3)
Montana 4,144 9.2 0.5 (8.2–10.2)
Nebraska 5,415 11.8 0.6 (10.7–12.9)
Nevada 2,323 14.1 1.0 (12.1–16.1)
New Hampshire 4,071 11.2 0.6 (10.1–12.3)
New Jersey 9,065 11.8 0.4 (11.0–12.6)
New Mexico 4,327 9.8 0.5 (8.7–10.9)
New York 3,914 10.9 0.6 (9.8–12.0)
North Carolina 10,364 12.8 0.4 (12.0–13.6)
North Dakota 3,255 10.7 0.6 (9.5–11.9)
Ohio 3,927 13.3 1.0 (11.4–15.2)
Oklahoma 4,708 15.2 0.6 (14.0–16.4)
Oregon 3,353 10.3 0.6 (9.2–11.4)
Pennsylvania 8,872 13.2 0.6 (12.0–14.4)
Rhode Island 2,971 11.3 0.7 (10.0–12.6)
South Carolina 6,203 12.3 0.5 (11.4–13.2)
South Dakota 4,535 13.1 0.6 (12.0–14.2)
Tennessee 2,986 15.1 0.9 (13.3–16.9)
Texas 4,360 11.7 0.8 (10.1–13.3)
Utah 2,974 9.3 0.6 (8.1–10.5)
Vermont 4,889 10.6 0.5 (9.7–11.5)
Virginia 3,551 12.4 0.9 (10.7–14.1)
Washington 16,419 9.9 0.3 (9.3–10.5)
West Virginia 2,610 19.7 0.8 (18.1–21.3)
Wisconsin 3,080 11.1 0.7 (9.8–12.4)
Wyoming 3,338 10.8 0.6 (9.6–12.0)
Puerto Rico 3,059 16.9 0.8 (15.4–18.4)
U.S.Virgin Islands 1,795 5.2 0.7 (3.9–6.5)
Median 11.8
Range 5.2–19.7
* Including heart attack and angina.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
Return to top.
Table 62

TABLE 62. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,* by
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Akron, Ohio 481 11.8 1.9 (8.0–15.6)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,188 7.9 0.9 (6.1–9.7)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 587 10.8 2.1 (6.6–15.0)
Asheville, North Carolina 391 11.0 2.2 (6.8–15.2)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 1,854 10.1 0.9 (8.4–11.8)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 358 13.6 2.0 (9.7–17.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 615 13.5 1.6 (10.4–16.6)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 333 10.6 1.9 (7.0–14.2)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 2,037 12.1 0.9 (10.3–13.9)
Barre, Vermont 503 7.3 1.2 (4.9–9.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 700 11.2 1.4 (8.5–13.9)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Marylandķ 1,119 10.7 1.1 (8.5–12.9)
Billings, Montana 335 6.1 1.3 (3.6–8.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 586 17.3 1.9 (13.6–21.0)
Bismarck, North Dakota 365 8.4 1.5 (5.4–11.4)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 770 10.7 1.2 (8.4–13.0)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusettsķ 1,463 9.6 0.9 (7.8–11.4)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 627 11.8 1.5 (8.9–14.7)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 1,638 8.4 0.9 (6.6–10.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,342 8.8 0.8 (7.2–10.4)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusettsķ 1,450 11.0 1.1 (8.9–13.1)
Camden, New Jerseyķ 1,198 13.1 1.1 (11.0–15.2)
Casper, Wyoming 386 12.6 1.9 (8.9–16.3)
Charleston, West Virginia 490 18.2 1.9 (14.5–21.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 697 11.0 1.3 (8.4–13.6)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,461 12.5 1.1 (10.4–14.6)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 476 11.8 1.7 (8.5–15.1)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 2,294 10.5 0.9 (8.8–12.2)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 643 10.2 2.2 (6.0–14.4)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 684 13.6 2.2 (9.3–17.9)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 459 8.6 1.4 (5.9–11.3)
Columbia, South Carolina 654 13.4 1.5 (10.5–16.3)
Concord, New Hampshire 440 12.3 1.8 (8.9–15.7)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texasķ 320 12.9 2.6 (7.8–18.0)
Dayton, Ohio 564 12.9 2.5 (8.0–17.8)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 1,735 8.4 0.7 (7.0–9.8)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 578 9.9 1.3 (7.3–12.5)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michiganķ 565 15.6 1.9 (11.8–19.4)
Dover, Delaware 861 13.4 1.3 (10.8–16.0)
Durham, North Carolina 637 10.4 1.4 (7.8–13.0)
Edison, New Jerseyķ 1,997 12.2 0.8 (10.6–13.8)
El Paso, Texas 307 9.1 1.7 (5.7–12.5)
Essex County, Massachusettsķ 1,086 9.2 1.2 (6.9–11.5)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 368 11.0 1.8 (7.4–14.6)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 431 7.3 1.4 (4.5–10.1)
Farmington, New Mexico 312 11.4 2.2 (7.1–15.7)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 317 14.5 2.5 (9.6–19.4)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 484 12.7 1.8 (9.2–16.2)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texasķ 296 7.8 2.2 (3.6–12.0)
Great Falls, Montana 372 13.4 2.1 (9.2–17.6)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 642 12.5 1.5 (9.6–15.4)
Greenville, South Carolina 557 12.2 1.5 (9.2–15.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 408 14.3 2.0 (10.3–18.3)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 1,778 10.2 0.8 (8.6–11.8)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 444 11.6 1.9 (7.9–15.3)
Hilo, Hawaii 963 9.4 1.0 (7.4–11.4)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 521 9.2 1.3 (6.7–11.7)
Honolulu, Hawaii 1,883 8.5 0.7 (7.1–9.9)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 298 13.8 3.6 (6.8–20.8)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 345 21.6 3.2 (15.3–27.9)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 1,239 12.5 1.1 (10.4–14.6)
Jackson, Mississippi 670 11.4 1.5 (8.5–14.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 456 12.2 2.0 (8.4–16.0)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 978 7.6 1.1 (5.5–9.7)
Kalispell, Montana 346 11.1 2.1 (6.9–15.3)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 2,092 11.4 0.9 (9.6–13.2)
Kapaa, Hawaii 452 9.5 1.6 (6.3–12.7)
Keene, New Hampshire 355 11.5 1.9 (7.9–15.1)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 421 10.9 2.0 (6.9–14.9)

TABLE 62. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,
by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 328 8.2 1.7 (5.0–11.4)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 757 14.9 1.5 (12.0–17.8)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,098 11.0 1.0 (9.0–13.0)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 428 13.3 2.0 (9.5–17.1)
Lincoln, Nebraska 528 11.9 1.5 (9.0–14.8)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 787 11.8 1.3 (9.2–14.4)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Californiaķ 456 8.8 1.7 (5.5–12.1)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 605 14.3 1.8 (10.8–17.8)
Lubbock, Texas 374 15.8 2.4 (11.1–20.5)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 927 9.3 1.0 (7.3–11.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 526 13.2 2.0 (9.3–17.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 1,425 12.7 1.1 (10.6–14.8)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 834 10.9 1.5 (7.9–13.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,529 9.5 0.8 (7.9–11.1)
Missoula, Montana 333 8.1 1.5 (5.1–11.1)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 520 14.6 1.6 (11.5–17.7)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 392 16.2 2.3 (11.7–20.7)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 467 8.4 1.4 (5.6–11.2)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvaniaķ 2,250 10.7 0.9 (8.9–12.5)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,344 11.3 1.1 (9.2–13.4)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 955 11.1 1.2 (8.8–13.4)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jerseyķ 3,024 8.9 0.7 (7.5–10.3)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 396 7.4 1.4 (4.6–10.2)
Ocean City, New Jersey 444 13.0 1.8 (9.5–16.5)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 462 8.4 1.4 (5.7–11.1)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,356 13.0 1.0 (11.0–15.0)
Olympia, Washington 1,061 9.3 1.0 (7.3–11.3)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,060 11.5 1.1 (9.4–13.6)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 502 9.6 1.4 (6.8–12.4)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniaķ 1,648 12.0 1.3 (9.5–14.5)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 877 12.2 1.4 (9.4–15.0)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2,528 14.7 1.4 (12.0–17.4)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 836 9.0 1.1 (6.8–11.2)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 2,430 9.0 0.7 (7.6–10.4)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 4,375 10.8 0.6 (9.7–11.9)
Provo-Orem, Utah 281 12.4 2.1 (8.3–16.5)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 706 11.1 1.4 (8.4–13.8)
Rapid City, South Dakota 630 12.4 1.4 (9.6–15.2)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 818 11.3 1.2 (8.9–13.7)
Richmond, Virginia 555 11.2 1.6 (8.0–14.4)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 408 13.7 2.2 (9.4–18.0)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshireķ 1,061 11.5 1.0 (9.5–13.5)
Rutland, Vermont 518 12.4 1.6 (9.2–15.6)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,045 12.1 1.6 (9.0–15.2)
Salt Lake City, Utah 1,227 8.9 0.9 (7.1–10.7)
San Antonio, Texas 363 10.5 1.7 (7.1–13.9)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 355 9.6 1.8 (6.0–13.2)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 481 7.9 1.6 (4.8–11.0)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 411 8.5 1.6 (5.4–11.6)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 402 11.9 1.7 (8.6–15.2)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 1,865 20.2 2.6 (15.1–25.3)
Seaford, Delaware 927 16.7 1.4 (13.9–19.5)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washingtonķ 3,078 7.2 0.6 (6.0–8.4)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 404 11.9 1.8 (8.4–15.4)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 575 11.4 1.5 (8.5–14.3)
Spokane, Washington 822 11.6 1.3 (9.0–14.2)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,063 11.8 1.4 (9.0–14.6)
Tacoma, Washingtonķ 1,043 12.0 1.2 (9.7–14.3)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 756 12.7 1.3 (10.1–15.3)
Toledo, Ohio 503 13.8 2.9 (8.2–19.4)
Topeka, Kansas 531 12.2 1.6 (9.0–15.4)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 353 7.1 1.4 (4.3–9.9)
Tucson, Arizona 564 10.5 1.4 (7.8–13.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,295 13.2 1.1 (11.0–15.4)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 727 9.6 1.5 (6.6–12.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michiganķ 801 13.4 1.3 (10.8–16.0)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-
Maryland-West Virginiaķ 3,636 13.6 2.2 (9.2–18.0)
Wenatchee, Washington 754 10.0 1.2 (7.6–12.4)

TABLE 62. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,
by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,092 11.2 1.0 (9.2–13.2)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jerseyķ 1,129 10.6 1.2 (8.3–12.9)
Wilmington, North Carolina 504 10.1 1.5 (7.1–13.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 419 13.0 1.8 (9.5–16.5)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,035 12.6 1.5 (9.7–15.5)
Yakima, Washington 501 10.8 1.7 (7.5–14.1)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 666 10.2 2.5 (5.3–15.1)
Yuma, Arizona 333 14.9 2.0 (11.0–18.8)
Median 11.4
Range 6.1–21.6
* Including heart attack and angina.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
ķ Metropolitan division.
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Table 63

TABLE 63. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,* by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE† (95% CI§)
Jefferson County, Alabama 358 17.0 2.2 (12.6–21.4)
Maricopa County, Arizona 566 12.1 1.5 (9.1–15.1)
Pima County, Arizona 564 10.5 1.4 (7.8–13.2)
Pinal County, Arizona 311 13.3 2.2 (9.1–17.5)
Yuma County, Arizona 333 14.9 2.0 (11.0–18.8)
Benton County, Arkansas 239 14.7 2.6 (9.7–19.7)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 455 12.3 1.7 (9.0–15.6)
Washington County, Arkansas 209 13.1 2.7 (7.8–18.4)
Alameda County, California 160 8.2 2.8 (2.7–13.7)
Los Angeles County, California 456 8.8 1.7 (5.5–12.1)
Riverside County, California 223 14.0 2.9 (8.4–19.6)
San Bernardino County, California 185 13.9 3.1 (7.8–20.0)
San Diego County, California 355 9.6 1.8 (6.0–13.2)
Adams County, Colorado 237 10.5 2.1 (6.3–14.7)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 404 7.7 1.5 (4.9–10.5)
Denver County, Colorado 370 9.7 1.7 (6.4–13.0)
Douglas County, Colorado 138 5.8 2.5 (0.8–10.8)
El Paso County, Colorado 436 8.2 1.4 (5.5–10.9)
Jefferson County, Colorado 490 8.8 1.4 (6.1–11.5)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 1,638 8.4 0.9 (6.6–10.2)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,284 10.4 1.0 (8.5–12.3)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 259 9.1 1.9 (5.3–12.9)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,344 11.3 1.1 (9.2–13.4)
New London County, Connecticut 396 7.4 1.4 (4.6–10.2)
Tolland County, Connecticut 235 10.9 2.2 (6.6–15.2)
Kent County, Delaware 861 13.4 1.3 (10.8–16.0)
New Castle County, Delaware 803 9.4 1.1 (7.2–11.6)
Sussex County, Delaware 927 16.7 1.4 (13.9–19.5)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 2,294 9.9 0.8 (8.3–11.5)
Broward County, Florida 481 12.2 1.9 (8.5–15.9)
Duval County, Florida 193 14.0 2.9 (8.3–19.7)
Hillsborough County, Florida 295 10.9 1.8 (7.3–14.5)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 576 11.7 1.5 (8.7–14.7)
Orange County, Florida 246 8.7 2.0 (4.8–12.6)
Palm Beach County, Florida 368 15.0 2.3 (10.4–19.6)
Pinellas County, Florida 262 10.4 2.0 (6.4–14.4)
Clayton County, Georgia 215 15.1 3.3 (8.7–21.5)
Cobb County, Georgia 239 9.7 2.1 (5.6–13.8)
DeKalb County, Georgia 285 6.9 2.0 (3.0–10.8)
Fulton County, Georgia 257 6.1 1.9 (2.4–9.8)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 196 9.1 2.2 (4.7–13.5)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 963 9.4 1.0 (7.4–11.4)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 1,883 8.5 0.7 (7.1–9.9)
Kauai County, Hawaii 452 9.5 1.6 (6.3–12.7)
Maui County, Hawaii 978 7.6 1.1 (5.5–9.7)
Ada County, Idaho 386 8.9 1.6 (5.9–11.9)
Canyon County, Idaho 287 14.7 2.3 (10.3–19.1)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 172 13.7 2.8 (8.2–19.2)
Cook County, Illinois 1,030 10.7 1.2 (8.4–13.0)
DuPage County, Illinois 231 10.4 2.6 (5.4–15.4)
Lake County, Illinois 165 9.8 2.6 (4.6–15.0)
Lake County, Indiana 331 11.0 1.9 (7.4–14.6)
Marion County, Indiana 788 12.2 1.4 (9.5–14.9)
Polk County, Iowa 433 10.4 1.6 (7.3–13.5)
Johnson County, Kansas 896 9.4 1.1 (7.3–11.5)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 827 11.9 1.2 (9.5–14.3)
Shawnee County, Kansas 384 12.5 1.9 (8.8–16.2)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 218 14.1 2.5 (9.2–19.0)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 320 14.1 2.6 (8.9–19.3)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 256 10.2 2.0 (6.2–14.2)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 408 10.2 1.7 (6.8–13.6)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 425 10.5 1.7 (7.2–13.8)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 190 9.7 2.3 (5.2–14.2)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 244 12.6 2.5 (7.7–17.5)
Cumberland County, Maine 443 10.2 1.6 (7.0–13.4)
York County, Maine 293 7.0 1.5 (4.1–9.9)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 372 10.7 1.7 (7.3–14.1)
Baltimore County, Maryland 652 10.5 1.4 (7.8–13.2)
Carroll County, Maryland 158 15.7 3.2 (9.4–22.0)

TABLE 63. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,
by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 192 13.8 3.0 (8.0–19.6)
Charles County, Maryland 179 9.3 2.3 (4.8–13.8)
Frederick County, Maryland 369 12.8 2.1 (8.8–16.8)
Harford County, Maryland 180 12.2 2.8 (6.6–17.8)
Howard County, Maryland 181 7.4 1.9 (3.8–11.0)
Montgomery County, Maryland 750 10.0 1.3 (7.5–12.5)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 417 12.8 2.0 (8.8–16.8)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 180 15.2 3.0 (9.3–21.1)
Washington County, Maryland 271 15.7 2.6 (10.5–20.9)
Baltimore city, Maryland 314 14.8 2.6 (9.8–19.8)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 1,404 10.3 1.3 (7.7–12.9)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,086 9.0 1.2 (6.7–11.3)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 841 11.3 1.6 (8.1–14.5)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,450 10.9 1.0 (8.9–12.9)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 431 8.2 1.4 (5.5–10.9)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 334 9.2 1.7 (5.9–12.5)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 698 11.8 1.5 (8.9–14.7)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,035 12.6 1.5 (9.7–15.5)
Macomb County, Michigan 269 14.5 2.3 (9.9–19.1)
Oakland County, Michigan 380 14.3 2.2 (10.0–18.6)
Wayne County, Michigan 565 15.6 1.9 (11.8–19.4)
Dakota County, Minnesota 190 8.5 2.2 (4.1–12.9)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 573 10.5 1.4 (7.8–13.2)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 259 8.2 1.7 (4.8–11.6)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 154 10.2 2.7 (4.9–15.5)
Hinds County, Mississippi 289 8.9 2.0 (5.0–12.8)
Rankin County, Mississippi 172 11.8 2.6 (6.6–17.0)
Jackson County, Missouri 342 10.5 1.8 (7.0–14.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 216 13.5 3.4 (6.9–20.1)
St. Louis city, Missouri 396 12.6 3.3 (6.2–19.0)
Cascade County, Montana 372 13.4 2.1 (9.2–17.6)
Flathead County, Montana 346 11.1 2.1 (6.9–15.3)
Missoula County, Montana 333 8.1 1.5 (5.1–11.1)
Yellowstone County, Montana 299 6.5 1.4 (3.7–9.3)
Douglas County, Nebraska 584 12.1 1.5 (9.2–15.0)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 493 12.3 1.6 (9.2–15.4)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 153 10.2 2.6 (5.1–15.3)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 393 12.2 1.7 (8.9–15.5)
Clark County, Nevada 757 14.9 1.5 (12.0–17.8)
Washoe County, Nevada 805 11.3 1.2 (8.9–13.7)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 355 11.5 1.9 (7.9–15.1)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 310 11.5 1.9 (7.8–15.2)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 927 9.3 1.0 (7.3–11.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 440 12.3 1.8 (8.9–15.7)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 668 10.1 1.2 (7.7–12.5)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 393 15.6 2.0 (11.6–19.6)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 358 13.6 2.0 (9.7–17.5)
Bergen County, New Jersey 682 10.7 1.3 (8.1–13.3)
Burlington County, New Jersey 385 14.1 1.9 (10.4–17.8)
Camden County, New Jersey 449 11.4 1.6 (8.3–14.5)
Cape May County, New Jersey 444 13.0 1.8 (9.5–16.5)
Essex County, New Jersey 654 9.9 1.4 (7.1–12.7)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 364 13.0 1.9 (9.2–16.8)
Hudson County, New Jersey 478 13.6 2.1 (9.4–17.8)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 354 7.3 1.5 (4.4–10.2)
Mercer County, New Jersey 353 7.1 1.4 (4.3–9.9)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 522 11.5 1.7 (8.1–14.9)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 535 11.5 1.4 (8.7–14.3)
Morris County, New Jersey 500 11.9 1.6 (8.8–15.0)
Ocean County, New Jersey 567 15.3 1.6 (12.1–18.5)
Passaic County, New Jersey 579 12.0 1.9 (8.2–15.8)
Somerset County, New Jersey 373 8.5 1.6 (5.3–11.7)
Sussex County, New Jersey 392 10.4 1.8 (6.8–14.0)
Union County, New Jersey 332 10.5 1.9 (6.8–14.2)
Warren County, New Jersey 376 8.0 1.7 (4.8–11.2)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 749 8.0 1.2 (5.7–10.3)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 328 8.2 1.7 (5.0–11.4)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 240 7.6 1.9 (3.8–11.4)
San Juan County, New Mexico 312 11.4 2.2 (7.1–15.7)

TABLE 63. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,
by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 411 8.5 1.6 (5.4–11.6)
Kings County, New York 285 10.2 1.9 (6.5–13.9)
Nassau County, New York 235 6.2 1.6 (3.1–9.3)
New York County, New York 290 7.0 1.5 (4.1–9.9)
Queens County, New York 257 7.7 1.9 (4.0–11.4)
Suffolk County, New York 232 9.7 2.2 (5.5–13.9)
Westchester County, New York 187 11.4 3.5 (4.5–18.3)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 254 11.7 2.3 (7.2–16.2)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 257 10.5 2.2 (6.3–14.7)
Catawba County, North Carolina 276 11.5 2.1 (7.4–15.6)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 261 15.0 2.7 (9.7–20.3)
Durham County, North Carolina 224 9.4 2.0 (5.6–13.2)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 287 12.3 2.2 (8.1–16.5)
Gaston County, North Carolina 268 17.1 2.7 (11.8–22.4)
Guilford County, North Carolina 295 12.9 2.1 (8.9–16.9)
Johnston County, North Carolina 262 15.7 2.3 (11.2–20.2)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 490 10.3 1.7 (6.9–13.7)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 288 9.5 2.0 (5.6–13.4)
Orange County, North Carolina 235 12.3 2.5 (7.4–17.2)
Randolph County, North Carolina 263 8.8 1.7 (5.6–12.0)
Union County, North Carolina 246 14.5 2.8 (9.1–19.9)
Wake County, North Carolina 376 9.3 1.7 (6.0–12.6)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 262 8.7 1.8 (5.1–12.3)
Cass County, North Dakota 402 9.5 1.6 (6.3–12.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 284 14.4 3.0 (8.5–20.3)
Hamilton County, Ohio 255 9.9 3.1 (3.8–16.0)
Lorain County, Ohio 342 13.1 2.0 (9.2–17.0)
Lucas County, Ohio 465 12.3 1.8 (8.7–15.9)
Mahoning County, Ohio 605 10.8 1.5 (7.8–13.8)
Montgomery County, Ohio 523 9.8 1.4 (7.0–12.6)
Summit County, Ohio 461 13.0 2.1 (9.0–17.0)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 228 13.5 2.5 (8.6–18.4)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 796 13.1 1.4 (10.4–15.8)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 930 11.7 1.2 (9.4–14.0)
Clackamas County, Oregon 307 6.9 1.5 (4.0–9.8)
Lane County, Oregon 368 11.0 1.8 (7.4–14.6)
Multnomah County, Oregon 484 10.6 1.6 (7.5–13.7)
Washington County, Oregon 297 9.7 2.0 (5.8–13.6)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 355 12.5 1.9 (8.7–16.3)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 1,685 17.2 2.7 (11.9–22.5)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 1,765 20.0 2.6 (14.8–25.2)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 205 7.8 1.9 (4.0–11.6)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,058 9.8 2.1 (5.6–14.0)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 212 14.5 3.2 (8.2–20.8)
Kent County, Rhode Island 434 12.4 1.7 (9.1–15.7)
Newport County, Rhode Island 266 6.8 1.6 (3.6–10.0)
Providence County, Rhode Island 1,780 10.9 0.8 (9.3–12.5)
Washington County, Rhode Island 362 12.6 1.8 (9.0–16.2)
Aiken County, South Carolina 376 13.9 1.9 (10.1–17.7)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 473 9.4 1.4 (6.7–12.1)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 165 14.2 3.1 (8.1–20.3)
Charleston County, South Carolina 398 10.0 1.5 (7.0–13.0)
Greenville County, South Carolina 338 10.9 1.9 (7.2–14.6)
Horry County, South Carolina 520 14.6 1.6 (11.5–17.7)
Lexington County, South Carolina 204 12.4 2.4 (7.7–17.1)
Richland County, South Carolina 279 11.9 2.1 (7.8–16.0)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 427 13.0 1.9 (9.3–16.7)
Pennington County, South Dakota 491 12.6 1.6 (9.5–15.7)
Davidson County, Tennessee 177 13.1 2.9 (7.3–18.9)
Shelby County, Tennessee 189 13.2 2.8 (7.7–18.7)
Bexar County, Texas 264 11.5 2.2 (7.3–15.7)
Dallas County, Texas 238 14.0 3.2 (7.8–20.2)
El Paso County, Texas 307 9.1 1.7 (5.7–12.5)
Harris County, Texas 209 13.7 4.8 (4.2–23.2)
Lubbock County, Texas 361 16.2 2.5 (11.4–21.0)
Tarrant County, Texas 260 7.5 2.3 (2.9–12.1)
Travis County, Texas 195 8.6 2.2 (4.2–13.0)
Davis County, Utah 213 9.1 2.1 (5.0–13.2)
Salt Lake County, Utah 934 9.0 1.0 (7.1–10.9)

TABLE 63. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they have coronary heart disease,
by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 144 5.6 2.2 (1.2–10.0)
Tooele County, Utah 149 10.4 3.1 (4.3–16.5)
Utah County, Utah 265 12.7 2.2 (8.5–16.9)
Weber County, Utah 240 6.6 1.5 (3.7–9.5)
Chittenden County, Vermont 982 8.8 0.9 (6.9–10.7)
Franklin County, Vermont 288 7.5 1.4 (4.7–10.3)
Orange County, Vermont 265 7.4 1.6 (4.3–10.5)
Rutland County, Vermont 518 12.4 1.6 (9.2–15.6)
Washington County, Vermont 503 7.3 1.2 (4.9–9.7)
Windsor County, Vermont 523 12.4 1.5 (9.5–15.3)
Asotin County, Washington 256 13.0 2.5 (8.1–17.9)
Benton County, Washington 243 10.7 2.4 (6.0–15.4)
Chelan County, Washington 411 9.8 1.6 (6.7–12.9)
Clark County, Washington 996 9.4 1.0 (7.5–11.3)
Douglas County, Washington 343 10.8 1.9 (7.2–14.4)
Franklin County, Washington 178 11.9 2.7 (6.7–17.1)
King County, Washington 2,066 7.2 0.6 (6.0–8.4)
Kitsap County, Washington 627 11.8 1.5 (8.9–14.7)
Pierce County, Washington 1,043 11.8 1.1 (9.6–14.0)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,012 7.9 0.9 (6.1–9.7)
Spokane County, Washington 822 11.6 1.3 (9.0–14.2)
Thurston County, Washington 1,061 9.3 1.0 (7.3–11.3)
Yakima County, Washington 501 10.8 1.7 (7.5–14.1)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 324 17.6 2.4 (13.0–22.2)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 584 11.1 2.0 (7.1–15.1)
Laramie County, Wyoming 476 11.8 1.7 (8.5–15.1)
Natrona County, Wyoming 386 12.6 1.9 (8.9–16.3)
Median 10.9
Range 5.6–20.0
* Including heart attack and angina.
† Standard error.
§ Confidence interval.
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Table 64

TABLE 64. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by state/territory —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
State/Territory Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Alabama 2,238 7.7 0.6 (6.5–8.9)
Alaska 1,132 4.9 1.1 (2.8–7.0)
Arizona 3,273 5.5 0.6 (4.3–6.7)
Arkansas 3,808 5.7 0.4 (4.9–6.5)
California 3,536 4.7 0.4 (3.9–5.5)
Colorado 3,737 3.1 0.3 (2.5–3.7)
Connecticut 5,600 3.6 0.3 (3.0–4.2)
Delaware 2,586 4.7 0.5 (3.6–5.8)
District of Columbia 2,291 5.9 0.7 (4.6–7.2)
Florida 7,424 5.3 0.3 (4.6–6.0)
Georgia 4,894 5.2 0.4 (4.5–5.9)
Hawaii 4,268 5.0 0.5 (4.1–5.9)
Idaho 3,280 4.1 0.4 (3.4–4.8)
Illinois 3,358 4.3 0.4 (3.5–5.1)
Indiana 4,116 4.9 0.4 (4.2–5.6)
Iowa 3,579 5.2 0.4 (4.4–6.0)
Kansas 5,556 4.7 0.3 (4.1–5.3)
Kentucky 4,278 6.5 0.5 (5.5–7.5)
Louisiana 4,406 5.8 0.4 (5.0–6.6)
Maine 2,678 4.1 0.4 (3.2–5.0)
Maryland 5,805 4.8 0.4 (4.1–5.5)
Massachusetts 7,952 3.6 0.3 (3.1–4.1)
Michigan 3,833 5.0 0.4 (4.2–5.8)
Minnesota 2,781 3.4 0.3 (2.7–4.1)
Mississippi 4,062 6.8 0.4 (6.0–7.6)
Missouri 3,587 6.2 0.6 (5.1–7.3)
Montana 4,138 4.8 0.4 (4.0–5.6)
Nebraska 5,401 4.7 0.3 (4.0–5.4)
Nevada 2,313 5.4 0.7 (4.1–6.7)
New Hampshire 4,066 3.5 0.3 (2.9–4.1)
New Jersey 9,052 3.9 0.2 (3.4–4.4)
New Mexico 4,322 4.2 0.4 (3.5–4.9)
New York 3,906 3.9 0.4 (3.1–4.7)
North Carolina 10,342 5.3 0.3 (4.8–5.8)
North Dakota 3,245 3.7 0.4 (2.9–4.5)
Ohio 3,924 4.8 0.6 (3.6–6.0)
Oklahoma 4,703 6.9 0.4 (6.1–7.7)
Oregon 3,338 4.5 0.4 (3.7–5.3)
Pennsylvania 8,845 4.7 0.4 (3.9–5.5)
Rhode Island 2,959 3.6 0.4 (2.9–4.3)
South Carolina 6,194 5.6 0.3 (4.9–6.3)
South Dakota 4,532 4.3 0.3 (3.7–4.9)
Tennessee 2,979 5.8 0.6 (4.6–7.0)
Texas 4,349 4.8 0.5 (3.8–5.8)
Utah 2,969 4.0 0.4 (3.2–4.8)
Vermont 4,877 3.1 0.3 (2.6–3.6)
Virginia 3,541 3.7 0.4 (2.9–4.5)
Washington 16,393 4.0 0.2 (3.6–4.4)
West Virginia 2,607 6.9 0.5 (5.8–8.0)
Wisconsin 3,078 4.3 0.4 (3.5–5.1)
Wyoming 3,327 3.9 0.4 (3.2–4.6)
Puerto Rico 3,047 3.0 0.3 (2.4–3.6)
U.S.Virgin Islands 1,789 3.5 0.5 (2.5–4.5)
Median 4.7
Range 3.0–7.7
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
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Table 65

TABLE 65. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by metropolitan and
micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Akron, Ohio 481 6.1 1.4 (3.5–8.7)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,184 3.7 0.6 (2.5–4.9)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 587 4.2 1.5 (1.3–7.1)
Asheville, North Carolina 389 4.0 1.2 (1.7–6.3)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia 1,849 3.8 0.5 (2.8–4.8)
Atlantic City, New Jersey 358 4.4 1.1 (2.2–6.6)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 614 6.4 1.2 (4.0–8.8)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 333 4.9 1.3 (2.4–7.4)
Baltimore-Towson, Maryland 2,036 4.7 0.6 (3.6–5.8)
Barre, Vermont 503 2.1 0.6 (1.0–3.2)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 697 5.9 0.9 (4.1–7.7)
Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland§ 1,118 3.9 0.7 (2.6–5.2)
Billings, Montana 335 4.4 1.1 (2.2–6.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 586 6.2 1.1 (4.1–8.3)
Bismarck, North Dakota 365 3.4 0.9 (1.5–5.3)
Boise City-Nampa, Idaho 766 3.8 0.7 (2.4–5.2)
Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts§ 1,460 4.2 0.6 (3.0–5.4)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 626 4.4 0.9 (2.7–6.1)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 1,638 3.0 0.5 (2.0–4.0)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,339 2.8 0.5 (1.8–3.8)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 1,448 2.8 0.5 (1.9–3.7)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,196 4.1 0.6 (2.9–5.3)
Casper, Wyoming 385 4.8 1.2 (2.4–7.2)
Charleston, West Virginia 489 7.3 1.3 (4.8–9.8)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 695 5.1 0.9 (3.4–6.8)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,460 5.0 0.7 (3.7–6.3)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 476 3.6 1.1 (1.5–5.7)
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 2,292 3.8 0.5 (2.8–4.8)
Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 644 5.3 1.9 (1.6–9.0)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio 683 4.7 1.2 (2.3–7.1)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 458 4.6 1.0 (2.6–6.6)
Columbia, South Carolina 652 5.8 1.0 (3.7–7.9)
Concord, New Hampshire 440 3.5 0.9 (1.8–5.2)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 320 5.6 1.9 (2.0–9.2)
Dayton, Ohio 565 5.1 1.4 (2.3–7.9)
Denver-Aurora, Colorado 1,725 3.1 0.4 (2.3–3.9)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 577 3.4 0.8 (1.9–4.9)
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan§ 566 5.8 1.1 (3.6–8.0)
Dover, Delaware 861 6.9 1.1 (4.7–9.1)
Durham, North Carolina 637 2.9 0.6 (1.7–4.1)
Edison, New Jersey§ 1,997 3.6 0.4 (2.8–4.4)
El Paso, Texas 305 3.2 1.1 (1.0–5.4)
Essex County, Massachusetts§ 1,086 2.7 0.6 (1.4–4.0)
Eugene-Springfield, Oregon 366 5.9 1.5 (2.9–8.9)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 431 NAķ NA —
Farmington, New Mexico 311 2.5 0.8 (1.0–4.0)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 315 7.9 1.6 (4.7–11.1)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 485 5.0 1.0 (3.0–7.0)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 294 6.6 2.2 (2.2–11.0)
Great Falls, Montana 372 6.5 1.5 (3.5–9.5)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 642 4.5 0.9 (2.8–6.2)
Greenville, South Carolina 553 3.9 0.8 (2.4–5.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 407 5.4 1.3 (2.8–8.0)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 1,773 3.5 0.5 (2.6–4.4)
Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina 444 7.0 1.5 (4.0–10.0)
Hilo, Hawaii 963 4.7 0.8 (3.2–6.2)
Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina 519 3.7 0.9 (1.9–5.5)
Honolulu, Hawaii 1,880 5.1 0.6 (3.9–6.3)
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas 297 4.6 2.2 (0.2–9.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 344 7.6 1.7 (4.2–11.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana 1,238 4.1 0.6 (3.0–5.2)
Jackson, Mississippi 669 4.9 0.9 (3.2–6.6)
Jacksonville, Florida 456 6.1 1.3 (3.5–8.7)
Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii 974 3.2 0.6 (2.0–4.4)
Kalispell, Montana 345 5.7 1.4 (3.0–8.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 2,090 5.2 0.6 (4.0–6.4)
Kapaa, Hawaii 451 6.1 1.4 (3.3–8.9)
Keene, New Hampshire 354 3.0 1.1 (0.9–5.1)
Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington 419 3.3 0.9 (1.5–5.1)

TABLE 65. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 329 3.1 1.1 (1.0–5.2)
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada 754 5.8 0.9 (4.0–7.6)
Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,093 2.7 0.5 (1.8–3.6)
Lewiston, Idaho-Washington 425 6.2 1.4 (3.5–8.9)
Lincoln, Nebraska 527 3.8 0.9 (2.0–5.6)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas 785 4.4 0.8 (2.9–5.9)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California§ 456 3.5 0.9 (1.7–5.3)
Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana 603 5.1 1.1 (3.0–7.2)
Lubbock, Texas 373 3.5 0.9 (1.7–5.3)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 925 3.1 0.6 (1.9–4.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 525 5.6 1.3 (3.1–8.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida 1,419 3.0 0.5 (2.0–4.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 834 3.9 0.9 (2.1–5.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,529 2.6 0.4 (1.8–3.4)
Missoula, Montana 332 4.8 1.3 (2.3–7.3)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 516 6.6 1.1 (4.4–8.8)
Nashville-Davidson—Murfreesboro, Tennessee 390 5.6 1.5 (2.6–8.6)
Nassau-Suffolk, New York§ 465 3.5 0.9 (1.7–5.3)
Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 2,247 3.3 0.4 (2.5–4.1)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,341 4.6 0.7 (3.2–6.0)
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana 953 4.2 0.8 (2.7–5.7)
New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey§ 3,016 3.1 0.4 (2.2–4.0)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 395 2.8 0.8 (1.2–4.4)
Ocean City, New Jersey 442 6.2 1.4 (3.6–8.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 462 4.3 1.0 (2.3–6.3)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,358 6.4 0.7 (5.1–7.7)
Olympia, Washington 1,056 3.3 0.6 (2.1–4.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,059 4.7 0.7 (3.4–6.0)
Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida 501 5.5 1.5 (2.6–8.4)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§§ 1,643 4.0 0.7 (2.6–5.4)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 876 5.1 0.9 (3.4–6.8)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2,513 4.8 0.8 (3.2–6.4)
Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine 835 5.1 0.9 (3.3–6.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington 2,427 3.4 0.5 (2.5–4.3)
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 4,359 3.5 0.3 (2.9–4.1)
Provo-Orem, Utah 280 2.9 0.9 (1.1–4.7)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina 706 3.5 0.9 (1.8–5.2)
Rapid City, South Dakota 628 3.5 0.7 (2.1–4.9)
Reno-Sparks, Nevada 815 4.1 0.8 (2.6–5.6)
Richmond, Virginia 554 3.9 1.0 (1.8–6.0)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 408 8.7 1.8 (5.2–12.2)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,062 3.5 0.6 (2.3–4.7)
Rutland, Vermont 518 2.7 0.7 (1.3–4.1)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,045 4.6 0.9 (2.9–6.3)
Salt Lake City, Utah 1,225 4.2 0.6 (3.0–5.4)
San Antonio, Texas 362 4.0 1.1 (1.8–6.2)
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California 353 5.6 1.4 (2.8–8.4)
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California 481 2.7 0.7 (1.3–4.1)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 412 2.8 1.0 (0.9–4.7)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 399 5.0 1.1 (2.8–7.2)
Scranton—Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 1,865 5.0 1.1 (2.9–7.1)
Seaford, Delaware 924 4.8 0.7 (3.3–6.3)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 3,075 3.2 0.3 (2.5–3.9)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 402 3.9 1.0 (1.9–5.9)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 575 4.4 0.9 (2.6–6.2)
Spokane, Washington 822 3.7 0.7 (2.3–5.1)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,064 3.1 0.7 (1.8–4.4)
Tacoma, Washington§ 1,043 5.4 0.8 (3.9–6.9)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 754 5.8 0.9 (4.0–7.6)
Toledo, Ohio 500 NA NA —
Topeka, Kansas 529 6.2 1.1 (4.0–8.4)
Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey 352 4.3 1.1 (2.2–6.4)
Tucson, Arizona 564 6.7 1.1 (4.5–8.9)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,292 6.1 0.7 (4.7–7.5)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 724 3.8 0.9 (2.0–5.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 794 3.7 0.7 (2.4–5.0)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-
West Virginia§ 3,631 3.0 0.4 (2.2–3.8)
Wenatchee, Washington 757 3.9 0.7 (2.5–5.3)

TABLE 65. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by metropolitan
and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
MMSA Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Wichita, Kansas 1,090 5.4 0.7 (4.0–6.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,127 5.7 0.8 (4.1–7.3)
Wilmington, North Carolina 501 5.2 1.2 (2.9–7.5)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 419 4.7 1.1 (2.6–6.8)
Worcester, Massachusetts 1,033 4.9 1.0 (3.0–6.8)
Yakima, Washington 501 4.9 1.0 (2.9–6.9)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 665 3.7 1.7 (0.5–6.9)
Yuma, Arizona 332 4.5 1.1 (2.3–6.7)
Median 4.4
Range 2.1–8.7
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Metropolitan division.
ķ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.
Return to top.
Table 66

TABLE 66. Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by county — Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE* (95% CI†)
Jefferson County, Alabama 357 7.2 1.5 (4.3–10.1)
Maricopa County, Arizona 567 5.1 0.9 (3.2–7.0)
Pima County, Arizona 564 6.7 1.1 (4.5–8.9)
Pinal County, Arizona 309 6.2 1.4 (3.5–8.9)
Yuma County, Arizona 332 4.5 1.1 (2.3–6.7)
Benton County, Arkansas 239 4.0 1.2 (1.7–6.3)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 453 3.8 1.0 (1.9–5.7)
Washington County, Arkansas 210 5.7 1.6 (2.6–8.8)
Alameda County, California 160 2.4 1.1 (0.2–4.6)
Los Angeles County, California 456 3.5 0.9 (1.7–5.3)
Riverside County, California 223 8.6 2.2 (4.3–12.9)
San Bernardino County, California 185 9.1 2.6 (4.0–14.2)
San Diego County, California 353 5.6 1.4 (2.8–8.4)
Adams County, Colorado 234 4.9 1.5 (1.9–7.9)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 403 3.0 0.8 (1.4–4.6)
Denver County, Colorado 368 3.4 1.1 (1.3–5.5)
Douglas County, Colorado 137 2.1 1.0 (0.1–4.1)
El Paso County, Colorado 435 4.6 1.0 (2.6–6.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 488 2.6 0.7 (1.3–3.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 1,638 3.0 0.5 (2.0–4.0)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,280 3.3 0.5 (2.2–4.4)
Middlesex County, Connecticut 259 3.5 1.1 (1.4–5.6)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,341 4.6 0.7 (3.2–6.0)
New London County, Connecticut 395 2.8 0.8 (1.2–4.4)
Tolland County, Connecticut 234 4.0 1.5 (1.0–7.0)
Kent County, Delaware 861 6.9 1.1 (4.7–9.1)
New Castle County, Delaware 801 3.9 0.8 (2.4–5.4)
Sussex County, Delaware 924 4.8 0.7 (3.3–6.3)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 2,291 5.9 0.7 (4.6–7.2)
Broward County, Florida 479 4.2 0.9 (2.4–6.0)
Duval County, Florida 193 6.3 1.9 (2.5–10.1)
Hillsborough County, Florida 294 3.8 1.1 (1.6–6.0)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 574 2.6 0.7 (1.2–4.0)
Orange County, Florida 246 4.4 1.9 (0.6–8.2)
Palm Beach County, Florida 366 2.2 0.9 (0.4–4.0)
Pinellas County, Florida 261 5.3 1.4 (2.5–8.1)
Clayton County, Georgia 212 5.1 1.5 (2.3–7.9)
Cobb County, Georgia 239 3.4 1.1 (1.2–5.6)
DeKalb County, Georgia 284 2.7 1.0 (0.7–4.7)
Fulton County, Georgia 257 4.5 1.2 (2.1–6.9)
Gwinnett County, Georgia 195 2.3 1.0 (0.3–4.3)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 963 4.7 0.8 (3.2–6.2)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 1,880 5.1 0.6 (3.9–6.3)
Kauai County, Hawaii 451 6.1 1.4 (3.3–8.9)
Maui County, Hawaii 974 3.2 0.6 (2.0–4.4)
Ada County, Idaho 383 3.0 0.8 (1.4–4.6)
Canyon County, Idaho 286 5.0 1.4 (2.3–7.7)
Nez Perce County, Idaho 169 6.9 2.3 (2.4–11.4)
Cook County, Illinois 1,027 3.7 0.7 (2.3–5.1)
DuPage County, Illinois 231 2.0 0.8 (0.4–3.6)
Lake County, Illinois 165 3.8 1.8 (0.3–7.3)
Lake County, Indiana 332 5.6 1.4 (2.9–8.3)
Marion County, Indiana 787 4.5 0.8 (2.9–6.1)
Polk County, Iowa 432 3.0 0.8 (1.4–4.6)
Johnson County, Kansas 896 3.4 0.7 (2.1–4.7)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 825 5.5 0.8 (3.9–7.1)
Shawnee County, Kansas 383 5.6 1.3 (3.1–8.1)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 217 7.7 1.9 (4.0–11.4)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 319 6.2 1.7 (2.8–9.6)
Caddo Parish, Louisiana 255 2.4 0.9 (0.6–4.2)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 407 5.3 1.1 (3.1–7.5)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana 425 4.0 1.0 (2.0–6.0)
Orleans Parish, Louisiana 190 4.2 1.9 (0.5–7.9)
St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana 243 3.8 1.3 (1.2–6.4)
Cumberland County, Maine 442 6.4 1.5 (3.5–9.3)
York County, Maine 293 3.9 1.1 (1.7–6.1)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 370 4.9 1.2 (2.5–7.3)
Baltimore County, Maryland 653 5.0 1.0 (3.1–6.9)
Carroll County, Maryland 158 NA§ NA —

TABLE 66. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Cecil County, Maryland 192 9.6 2.7 (4.4–14.8)
Charles County, Maryland 178 4.6 1.8 (1.1–8.1)
Frederick County, Maryland 369 3.9 1.1 (1.7–6.1)
Harford County, Maryland 180 2.9 1.2 (0.5–5.3)
Howard County, Maryland 181 NA NA —
Montgomery County, Maryland 749 3.8 0.8 (2.3–5.3)
Prince Georgeīs County, Maryland 416 4.5 1.0 (2.6–6.4)
Queen Anneīs County, Maryland 180 5.0 2.0 (1.1–8.9)
Washington County, Maryland 270 6.5 1.8 (3.1–9.9)
Baltimore city, Maryland 314 6.6 1.6 (3.5–9.7)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 1,400 3.0 0.6 (1.8–4.2)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,086 2.7 0.7 (1.4–4.0)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 842 3.1 0.7 (1.6–4.6)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,448 2.8 0.5 (1.8–3.8)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 433 4.4 1.0 (2.4–6.4)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 332 3.9 1.1 (1.7–6.1)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 695 3.8 0.9 (2.0–5.6)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,033 4.9 1.0 (3.0–6.8)
Macomb County, Michigan 267 4.4 1.2 (2.0–6.8)
Oakland County, Michigan 377 3.6 1.0 (1.7–5.5)
Wayne County, Michigan 566 5.8 1.1 (3.6–8.0)
Dakota County, Minnesota 190 1.6 0.8 (0.1–3.1)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 573 2.7 0.6 (1.4–4.0)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 259 3.0 1.2 (0.7–5.3)
DeSoto County, Mississippi 154 4.8 1.7 (1.4–8.2)
Hinds County, Mississippi 289 3.7 1.2 (1.3–6.1)
Rankin County, Mississippi 172 6.0 1.8 (2.6–9.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 341 6.9 1.6 (3.8–10.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 216 4.8 1.8 (1.2–8.4)
St. Louis city, Missouri 397 6.2 1.4 (3.6–8.8)
Cascade County, Montana 372 6.5 1.5 (3.5–9.5)
Flathead County, Montana 345 5.7 1.4 (3.0–8.4)
Missoula County, Montana 332 4.8 1.3 (2.3–7.3)
Yellowstone County, Montana 299 4.8 1.3 (2.3–7.3)
Douglas County, Nebraska 584 4.1 0.8 (2.5–5.7)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 492 4.1 1.0 (2.2–6.0)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 153 2.8 1.3 (0.3–5.3)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 390 5.1 1.1 (2.8–7.4)
Clark County, Nevada 754 5.8 0.9 (4.0–7.6)
Washoe County, Nevada 802 3.9 0.7 (2.5–5.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 354 3.0 1.1 (0.9–5.1)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 309 2.4 0.8 (0.9–3.9)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 925 3.1 0.6 (1.9–4.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 440 3.5 0.9 (1.8–5.2)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 668 3.3 0.8 (1.8–4.8)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 394 4.1 1.0 (2.2–6.0)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 358 4.4 1.1 (2.2–6.6)
Bergen County, New Jersey 681 2.7 0.7 (1.4–4.0)
Burlington County, New Jersey 385 3.8 1.1 (1.7–5.9)
Camden County, New Jersey 449 4.7 1.1 (2.5–6.9)
Cape May County, New Jersey 442 6.2 1.4 (3.6–8.8)
Essex County, New Jersey 653 4.4 0.9 (2.7–6.1)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 362 3.6 0.9 (1.8–5.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 477 3.9 0.9 (2.0–5.8)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 353 3.3 0.9 (1.5–5.1)
Mercer County, New Jersey 352 4.3 1.1 (2.2–6.4)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 522 2.7 0.7 (1.3–4.1)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 536 3.4 0.7 (1.9–4.9)
Morris County, New Jersey 500 3.3 0.9 (1.6–5.0)
Ocean County, New Jersey 567 4.3 0.9 (2.6–6.0)
Passaic County, New Jersey 576 3.4 1.4 (0.7–6.1)
Somerset County, New Jersey 372 3.6 1.0 (1.6–5.6)
Sussex County, New Jersey 392 2.5 0.7 (1.2–3.8)
Union County, New Jersey 331 2.8 0.8 (1.2–4.4)
Warren County, New Jersey 376 2.5 0.7 (1.1–3.9)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 745 2.9 0.6 (1.7–4.1)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 329 3.1 1.1 (1.0–5.2)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 240 5.6 1.9 (1.8–9.4)
San Juan County, New Mexico 311 2.5 0.8 (1.0–4.0)

TABLE 66. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 412 2.8 1.0 (0.9–4.7)
Kings County, New York 283 2.2 0.8 (0.6–3.8)
Nassau County, New York 235 4.2 1.6 (1.1–7.3)
New York County, New York 290 1.5 0.6 (0.2–2.8)
Queens County, New York 257 5.2 1.9 (1.6–8.8)
Suffolk County, New York 230 3.0 1.1 (0.9–5.1)
Westchester County, New York 186 4.8 2.0 (1.0–8.6)
Buncombe County, North Carolina 253 4.0 1.2 (1.6–6.4)
Cabarrus County, North Carolina 257 4.3 1.5 (1.4–7.2)
Catawba County, North Carolina 276 5.3 1.4 (2.6–8.0)
Cumberland County, North Carolina 260 7.8 1.7 (4.5–11.1)
Durham County, North Carolina 224 2.8 0.9 (1.0–4.6)
Forsyth County, North Carolina 287 4.2 1.2 (1.8–6.6)
Gaston County, North Carolina 267 7.1 1.8 (3.5–10.7)
Guilford County, North Carolina 295 2.9 1.0 (0.9–4.9)
Johnston County, North Carolina 263 6.2 2.2 (2.0–10.4)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 490 4.5 1.0 (2.5–6.5)
New Hanover County, North Carolina 287 1.7 0.6 (0.5–2.9)
Orange County, North Carolina 235 3.5 1.2 (1.1–5.9)
Randolph County, North Carolina 263 6.4 1.5 (3.4–9.4)
Union County, North Carolina 246 3.6 1.3 (1.1–6.1)
Wake County, North Carolina 376 2.0 0.8 (0.4–3.6)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 262 3.2 1.1 (1.0–5.4)
Cass County, North Dakota 402 3.1 0.8 (1.6–4.6)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 283 6.1 2.0 (2.3–9.9)
Hamilton County, Ohio 255 NA NA —
Lorain County, Ohio 342 2.8 0.8 (1.2–4.4)
Lucas County, Ohio 462 3.5 0.9 (1.7–5.3)
Mahoning County, Ohio 604 4.4 1.0 (2.5–6.3)
Montgomery County, Ohio 523 5.5 1.1 (3.4–7.6)
Summit County, Ohio 461 6.6 1.4 (3.9–9.3)
Cleveland County, Oklahoma 228 2.0 0.7 (0.6–3.4)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 797 6.9 0.9 (5.2–8.6)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 928 6.4 0.8 (4.8–8.0)
Clackamas County, Oregon 306 3.5 1.1 (1.3–5.7)
Lane County, Oregon 366 5.9 1.5 (2.9–8.9)
Multnomah County, Oregon 484 3.7 1.0 (1.8–5.6)
Washington County, Oregon 296 2.8 0.9 (1.1–4.5)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 351 5.7 1.3 (3.1–8.3)
Fayette County, Pennsylvania 1,676 4.7 0.6 (3.5–5.9)
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 1,765 4.8 0.7 (3.4–6.2)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 204 3.2 1.6 (0.1–6.3)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,055 4.2 1.2 (1.9–6.5)
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania 212 NA NA —
Kent County, Rhode Island 433 4.6 1.2 (2.2–7.0)
Newport County, Rhode Island 264 3.6 1.3 (1.0–6.2)
Providence County, Rhode Island 1,773 3.8 0.5 (2.9–4.7)
Washington County, Rhode Island 360 2.3 0.7 (0.8–3.8)
Aiken County, South Carolina 375 6.8 1.4 (4.0–9.6)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 471 3.7 1.0 (1.8–5.6)
Berkeley County, South Carolina 165 9.7 2.5 (4.7–14.7)
Charleston County, South Carolina 398 3.6 0.9 (1.9–5.3)
Greenville County, South Carolina 335 4.4 1.0 (2.4–6.4)
Horry County, South Carolina 516 6.6 1.1 (4.4–8.8)
Lexington County, South Carolina 203 6.7 1.8 (3.2–10.2)
Richland County, South Carolina 278 3.4 1.1 (1.2–5.6)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 427 4.5 1.1 (2.4–6.6)
Pennington County, South Dakota 490 3.5 0.8 (1.9–5.1)
Davidson County, Tennessee 176 3.4 1.1 (1.3–5.5)
Shelby County, Tennessee 189 5.6 1.6 (2.4–8.8)
Bexar County, Texas 264 3.1 1.2 (0.7–5.5)
Dallas County, Texas 238 6.6 2.4 (1.9–11.3)
El Paso County, Texas 305 3.2 1.1 (1.0–5.4)
Harris County, Texas 208 1.5 0.6 (0.4–2.6)
Lubbock County, Texas 360 3.5 1.0 (1.6–5.4)
Tarrant County, Texas 258 7.9 2.7 (2.6–13.2)
Travis County, Texas 195 4.3 1.6 (1.2–7.4)
Davis County, Utah 213 2.9 1.2 (0.5–5.3)
Salt Lake County, Utah 932 4.2 0.7 (2.9–5.5)

TABLE 66. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged >45 years who have ever been told they had a stroke, by county —
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2006
County Sample size % SE (95% CI)
Summit County, Utah 144 NA NA —
Tooele County, Utah 149 6.1 2.8 (0.6–11.6)
Utah County, Utah 264 2.8 0.9 (1.0–4.6)
Weber County, Utah 240 5.6 1.6 (2.5–8.7)
Chittenden County, Vermont 980 2.7 0.6 (1.6–3.8)
Franklin County, Vermont 287 2.6 0.9 (0.8–4.4)
Orange County, Vermont 265 2.1 0.9 (0.3–3.9)
Rutland County, Vermont 518 2.7 0.7 (1.3–4.1)
Washington County, Vermont 503 2.1 0.6 (1.0–3.2)
Windsor County, Vermont 519 3.2 0.7 (1.7–4.7)
Asotin County, Washington 256 6.0 1.6 (2.9–9.1)
Benton County, Washington 244 3.4 1.1 (1.3–5.5)
Chelan County, Washington 412 3.8 0.9 (2.0–5.6)
Clark County, Washington 995 3.3 0.6 (2.2–4.4)
Douglas County, Washington 345 4.3 1.2 (2.0–6.6)
Franklin County, Washington 175 3.3 1.5 (0.4–6.2)
King County, Washington 2,065 3.4 0.4 (2.6–4.2)
Kitsap County, Washington 626 4.4 0.9 (2.7–6.1)
Pierce County, Washington 1,043 5.2 0.7 (3.8–6.6)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,010 3.8 0.6 (2.6–5.0)
Spokane County, Washington 822 3.7 0.7 (2.3–5.1)
Thurston County, Washington 1,056 3.3 0.6 (2.1–4.5)
Yakima County, Washington 501 4.9 1.0 (2.9–6.9)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 324 7.1 1.5 (4.1–10.1)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 584 5.7 1.5 (2.7–8.7)
Laramie County, Wyoming 476 3.6 1.1 (1.5–5.7)
Natrona County, Wyoming 385 4.8 1.2 (2.4–7.2)
Median 4.0
Range 1.5–9.7
* Standard error.
† Confidence interval.
§ Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.
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Table 67

TABLE 67. Assessment of the Healthy People 2010* objectives† using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data
for selected indicators
Year 2010 Range for Range for Range for
Objective no. Objective target states MMSAs§ countiesķ
1-1 Increase the proportion of persons with health
insurance** 100% 70.2%–92.4% 60.9%–93.8% 60.9%–96.1%
3-11b Increase the proportion of women (aged >18 yrs)
who had received a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during
the preceding 3 yrs 90% 72.3%–89.4% 74.7%–93.9% 74.7%–95.4%
3-12 Increase the proportion of adults(aged >50 yrs)
who receive a colorectal cancer screening examination
Fecal Occult Blood Test during the preceding 2 yrs 33%†† 5.%1–32.5% 8.9%–43.5% 6.1%–46.6%
Sigmoidoscopy§§ during lifetime 50% 37.8%–69.2% 44.9%–72.4% 43.9%–83.6%
3-13 Increase the proportion of women aged >40 yrs who
have received a mammogram during the preceding 2 yrs 70% 61.3%–84.8% 60.6%–87.8% 60.0%–88.9%
26-11c Reduce the proportion of adults (aged >18 yrs) who
engaged in binge drinking during the preceding month 13.4%†† 8.6%–24.3% 5.5%–24.8% 4.7%–24.9%
19-2 Reduce the proportion of adults (aged >20 yrs) who
are obese (BMIķķ >30.0) 15% 18.7%–31.9% 14.6%–45.5% 9.8%–36.9%
14-29a Increase the proportion of adults (aged >65 yrs) who
are vaccinated against influenza 90% 33.1%–75.9% 54.1%–80.9% 42.6%–90.2%
14-29b Increase the proportion of adults (aged >65 yrs) who
have ever been vaccinated against pneumococcal disease 90% 29.5%–74.7% 52.4%–79.6% 42.2%–82.1%
15-19 Increase use of safety belts*** 92% 58.4%–91.9% 58.8%–93.3% 58.0%–94.1%
22-1 Reduce the proportion of adults (aged >18 yrs) who
engage in no leisure-time physical activity 20% 14.2%–41.2% 12.9%–31.4% 10.6%–36.1%
21-4 Reduce the proportion of older adults who have had all
their natural teeth extracted††† 22%†† 9.6%–40.5% 7.1%–48.1% 5.1%–37.8%
27-1a Reduce the proportion of adults (aged >18 yrs) who
smoke cigarettes 12% 8.9%–28.5% 5.9%–31.2% 5.7%–31.2%
* SOURCE: US Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy people 2010: understanding and improving health. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: US
Department of Health and Human Services; 2000. Available at http://www.healthypeople.gov.
† Certain objectives might differ slightly from BRFSS definitions. BRFSS prevalence estimates are not age-adjusted.
§ Selected metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas.
ķ Selected counties.
** Baseline measured insurance coverage among persons aged <65 years. Based on 1997 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data.
†† Revised targets. Source: CDC. CDC Wonder. Data 2010: the Healthy People 2010 database. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human
Services, CDC; 2008. Available at http://www.wonder.cdc.gov/data2010.
§§ Baseline and target are for sigmoidoscopy only. BRFSS measured sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy. Based on 1998 NHIS data.
ķķ Body mass index.
*** Baseline and target are for vehicle occupants of all ages. Based on 1998 National Occupant Protection Use Survey.
†††Baseline was 26% for adults aged 65–74 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted. Based on 1997 NHIS data.
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