Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content
CDC Home

National, State, and Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19--35 Months --- United States, 2007

The National Immunization Survey (NIS) provides vaccination coverage estimates among children aged 19--35 months for each of the 50 states and selected urban areas.* This report describes the results of the 2007 NIS, which provided coverage estimates among children born during January 2004--July 2006. Healthy People 2010 established vaccination coverage targets of 90% for each of the vaccines included in the combined 4:3:1:3:3:1 vaccine series and a target of 80% for the combined series (1). Findings from the 2007 NIS indicated that >90% coverage was achieved for most of the routinely recommended vaccines (2). The majority of parents were vaccinating their children, with less than 1% of children receiving no vaccines by age 19--35 months. The coverage level for the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series remained steady at 77.4%, compared with 76.9% in 2006. Among states and local areas, substantial variability continued, with estimated vaccination coverage ranging from 63.1% to 91.3%. Coverage remained high across all racial/ethnic groups and was not significantly different among racial/ethnic groups after adjusting for poverty status. However, for some vaccines, coverage remained lower among children living below the poverty level compared with children living at or above the poverty level. Maintaining high vaccination coverage and continued attention to reducing current poverty disparities is needed to limit the spread -preventable diseases and ensure that children are protected.

To collect vaccination information on age-eligible children (i.e., those aged 19--35 months), NIS uses a quarterly, random-digit--dialing sample of telephone numbers for each survey area. When respondents grant permission to contact providers, the telephone interview is followed by a mail survey of the children's vaccination providers to validate immunization information. NIS methodology, including how the responses are weighted to represent the population of children aged 19--35 months, has been described previously (3). During 2007, the household response rate (4) was 64.9%; a total of 17,017 children with provider-verified vaccination records were included in this report, representing 68.6% of all children with completed household interviews. Statistical analyses were conducted using t-tests. Differences were considered statistically significant at p<0.05. A poverty status variable§ was added to the logistic regression models to control for racial/ethnic differences among children living at or above the poverty level and children living below the poverty level. This report describes coverage levels for vaccines that have been included in the routine childhood vaccination schedule recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) since 2000 or before (2).

In 2007, national coverage with the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series was 77.4%; this coverage has been stable since 2004. Coverage with the combined 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 vaccine series (i.e., the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series plus >4 doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV7]) is being reported for the first time and was 66.5%. National coverage was >90% for each of the vaccines included in the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series except for >4 doses of DTaP (84.5%); coverage with >3 doses of DTaP was 95.5% (Table 1). Coverage with >1 dose of varicella vaccine (VAR) reached 90% for the first time. VAR coverage among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children increased significantly, from 85.4% in 2006 to 94.9% in 2007. National vaccination coverage estimates for PCV7 continued to increase, from 86.9% in 2006 to 90.0% in 2007 for >3 doses and from 68.4% to 75.3% for >4 doses. Among AI/AN children, coverage with the fourth dose of PCV7 increased significantly, from 62.7% to 80.4%.

Substantial differences were observed in vaccination coverage among states and local areas (Table 2). Estimated coverage for the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series ranged from 91.3% in Maryland to 63.1% in Nevada. Among the 14 local areas included in the 2007 NIS, coverage with the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series ranged from 82.2% in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to 69.6% in San Bernardino, California.

Vaccination coverage levels were higher among AI/ANs compared with whites for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine, and VAR (Table 3). Coverage with the fourth dose of DTaP and the fourth dose of PCV7 among black children was not significantly lower than white children after controlling for poverty status. Vaccination coverage with the fourth dose of DTaP and the fourth dose of PCV7 was lower among children living below the poverty level compared with children living at or above the poverty level, but this difference declined from 6.1% in 2006 to 4.8% in 2007 for >4 doses of DTaP and from 9.4% in 2006 to 3.5% in 2007 for >4 doses of PCV7. Vaccination coverage levels were similar across all racial/ethnic groups for the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series. Coverage differed for this series among children living at or above the poverty level compared with children living below the poverty level, but this difference declined from 4.9% in 2006 to 3.2% in 2007. Coverage between white and black children with the 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 series was not significantly different after controlling for poverty status.

Reported by: N Darling, MPH, M Kolasa, MPH, KG Wooten, MA, Immunization Svcs Div, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.

Editorial Note:

NIS is the only population-based, provider-verified survey to provide national, state, and local area estimates of vaccination coverage among children aged 19--35 months. The results of the 2007 survey indicate that vaccination coverage for vaccines recommended routinely by ACIP since 2000 and before (2) reached record high levels. Improvements in vaccination coverage for VAR meant that national coverage estimates for all individual vaccines in the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series were >90%, except coverage with >4 doses of DTaP. Coverage with >4 doses of PCV7 also was <90%. However, 3-dose coverage for both DTaP and PCV7 remained high. Coverage with >4 doses of PCV7 increased significantly to 75.3% in 2007, a substantial increase since PCV7 was first recommended in 2000 (5). However, coverage with >4 doses of DTaP has not changed during the past 5 years. Increasing coverage for the fourth dose of DTaP and the fourth dose of PCV7 would improve national coverage for the 4:3:1:3:3:1 series and the 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 series, which will be used to monitor the Healthy People 2010 immunization objectives beginning with 2009 NIS data. The vaccine shortage that ended in September 2004 (6) might have reduced coverage with the fourth dose of PCV7 among children in the 2007 NIS cohort (i.e., those born during January 2004--July 2006). Use of effective interventions, such as parent and provider reminder/recall, reducing out-of-pocket costs, increasing access to vaccination, and multicomponent interventions that include education might further improve overall coverage in areas where coverage is low (7). In addition, closing the coverage gap between areas with the highest and lowest coverage remains a priority. To achieve this, further collaborative efforts among CDC, state immunization coordinators, immunization programs, and other entities are essential.

Vaccination coverage among AI/AN children for VAR, MMR vaccine, and the fourth dose of PCV7 increased significantly in 2007 compared with 2006; in 2007, coverage levels among AI/AN children were higher for two of these vaccines (VAR and MMR vaccine) compared with white children. Improved exchange of data between the Indian Health Service information system and state immunization information systems and implementation of evidence-based strategies such as reminder/recall at Indian Health Service and tribal facilities, might have contributed to these increases in vaccination coverage (A. Groom, CDC, personal communication, August 2008). However, further monitoring is needed to determine whether these levels will be sustained.

As in 2006, the results of the 2007 NIS indicate that differences in poverty status accounted for the observed differences in coverage between white and black children for the fourth dose of DTaP and fourth dose of PCV7. In 2007, these differences in coverage between children living at or above the poverty level compared with children living below the poverty level were reduced by one percentage point for DTaP and by nearly six percentage points for PCV7. Continued efforts are needed to improve vaccination coverage among children of all racial and ethnic groups living below the poverty level.

The 2007 NIS results confirm that the majority of parents are vaccinating their children, with less than 1% of children receiving no vaccines by age 19--35 months. Although vaccination coverage in this age group remains high, recent outbreaks of measles have occurred in certain communities (8). Several factors might explain this apparent paradox. Despite record high coverage with MMR vaccine, nearly 8% of children aged 19--35 months surveyed for the 2007 NIS remained unvaccinated. Measles is highly contagious, and clustering of unimmunized children within geographic areas can increase risk for measles and other vaccine-preventable disease transmission. Clusters of unimmunized children might not be detected by NIS methods and might not be visible in national and state rates. Furthermore, any changes in vaccination behaviors among parents of children born after July 2006 would not have been detected by the 2007 survey. Increased attention to parental concerns about vaccine safety has become apparent in recent years (9). The 2008 NIS is collecting information on parental concerns about vaccine safety to better assess parental attitudes and beliefs about vaccines. In addition, CDC and its partners are developing new educational materials that can assist parents in making fully informed decisions about immunizing their children.**

The findings in this report are subject to at least three limitations. First, NIS is a telephone survey, and statistical adjustments might not compensate fully for nonresponse and households without landline telephones. Second, underestimates of vaccination coverage might have resulted from the exclusive use of provider-verified vaccination histories because completeness of these records is unknown. Finally, although national coverage estimates are precise, annual estimates and trends for state and local areas should be interpreted with caution because of smaller sample sizes and wider confidence intervals.

Achieving and maintaining high vaccination coverage levels is important to further reduce the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases and prevent a resurgence of measles and other diseases that have been eliminated in the United States (10). Although vaccination coverage estimates were at record highs and above the Healthy People 2010 target for most of the routinely recommended vaccines in 2007, ongoing efforts through partnerships among national, state, local, private, and public entities are needed to sustain these levels and ensure that vaccination programs in the United States remain strong.

Acknowledgments

The findings in this report are based, in part, on contributions by PJ Smith, PhD, Immunization Svcs Div, and BP Bell, MD, Office of the Director, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.

References

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy people 2010 (conference ed, in 2 vols). Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2000. Available at http://www.healthypeople.gov/document/html/objectives/14-24.htm.
  2. CDC. Recommendations and guidelines: 2008 child & adolescent immunization schedules for persons aged 0--6 years, 7--18 years, and catch-up schedule. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2008. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/child-schedule.htm.
  3. CDC. Statistical methodology of the National Immunization Survey, 1994--2002. Vital Health Stat 2005;2(138). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_138.pdf.
  4. Ezzati-Rice TM, Frankel MR, Hoaglin DC, Loft JD, Coronado VG, Wright RA. An alternative measure of response rate in random-digit-dialing surveys that screen for eligible subpopulations. J Econ Soc Meas 2000;26:99--109.
  5. CDC. Preventing pneumococcal disease among infants and young children: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR 2000;49(No. RR-9).
  6. CDC. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine shortage resolved. MMWR 2004; 53:851--2.
  7. Briss PA, Rodewald LE, Hinman AR, et al. Reviews of evidence regarding interventions to improve vaccination coverage in children, adolescents, and adults. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services. Am J Prev Med 2000;18:97--140.
  8. CDC. Update: measles---United States, January--July 2008. MMWR 2008;57:893--6.
  9. Cooper LZ, Larsen HJ, Katz SL. Protecting public trust in immunization. Pediatrics 2008;122:149--53.
  10. CDC. Measles---United States, January 1--April 25, 2008. MMWR 2008; 57:494--8.

* Fourteen local areas were sampled separately for the 2007 NIS. These included six areas that receive federal immunization grant funds and are included in the NIS sample every year (District of Columbia; Chicago, Illinois; New York, New York; Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; Bexar County, Texas; and Houston, Texas); seven previously sampled areas (Alameda County, California; Los Angeles County, California; San Bernardino County, California; Miami-Dade County, Florida; Marion County, Indiana; Dallas County, Texas; and El Paso County, Texas); and one area sampled for the first time (western Washington). Local areas sampled in the NIS might change yearly as state immunization programs target local assessments where they are most needed.

>4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus toxoid, and any acellular pertussis vaccine, which can include diphtheria and tetanus toxoid vaccine or diphtheria, tetanus toxoid, and pertussis vaccine (DTaP); >3 doses of poliovirus vaccine; >1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine; >3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine; >3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine; and >1 dose of varicella vaccine).

§ Poverty status was based on 2006 U.S. Census poverty thresholds (available at http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty.html).

For this report, persons identified as white, black, Asian, or American Indian/Alaska Native are all non-Hispanic. Persons identified as Hispanic might be of any race.

** Additional information available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines.

Table 1

TABLE 1. Estimated vaccination coverage among children aged 19–35 months, by selected vaccines and dosages — National
Immunization Survey, United States, 2003–2007
2003* 2004† 2005§ 2006¶ 2007**
Vaccine % (95% CI††) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI)
DTP/DT/DTaP§§
≥3 doses 96.0 (±0.5) 95.9 (±0.5) 96.1 (±0.5) 95.8 (±0.5) 95.5 (±0.5)
≥4 doses 84.8 (±0.8) 85.5 (±0.8) 85.7 (±0.9) 85.2 (±0.9) 84.5 (±0.9)
Poliovirus 91.6 (±0.7) 91.6 (±0.7) 91.7 (±0.7) 92.8 (±0.6) 92.6 (±0.7)
MMR¶¶ ≥1 dose 93.0 (±0.6) 93.0 (±0.6) 91.5 (±0.7) 92.3 (±0.6) 92.3 (±0.7)
Hib*** ≥3 doses 93.9 (±0.6) 93.5 (±0.6) 93.9 (±0.6) 93.4 (±0.6) 92.6 (±0.7)
Hepatitis B ≥3 doses 92.4 (±0.6) 92.4 (±0.6) 92.9 (±0.6) 93.3 (±0.6) 92.7 (±0.7)
Varicella ≥1 dose 84.8 (±0.8) 87.5 (±0.7) 87.9 (±0.8) 89.2 (±0.7) 90.0 (±0.7)
PCV7†††
≥3 doses 68.1 (±1.0) 73.2 (±1.0) 82.8 (±1.0) 86.9 (±0.8) 90.0 (±0.8)
≥4 doses 35.8 (±1.0) 43.4 (±1.1) 53.7 (±1.3) 68.4 (±1.1) 75.3 (±1.2)
Combined series
4:3:1§§§ 82.2 (±0.9) 83.5 (±0.9) 83.1 (±1.0) 83.1 (±0.9) 82.8 (±1.0)
4:3:1:3¶¶¶ 81.3 (±0.9) 82.5 (±0.9) 82.4 (±1.0) 82.1 (±1.0) 81.8 (±1.0)
4:3:1:3:3**** 79.4 (±0.9) 80.9 (±0.9) 80.8 (±1.0) 80.5 (±1.0) 80.1 (±1.0)
4:3:1:3:3:1†††† 72.5 (±1.0) 76.0 (±1.0) 76.1 (±1.1) 76.9 (±1.0) 77.4 (±1.1)
4:3:1:3:3:1:4§§§§ 30.8 (±1.0) 38.4 (±1.1) 47.2 (±1.3) 60.1 (±1.2) 66.5 (±1.3)
Children who received no vaccinations 0.4 (±0.1) 0.4 (±0.2) 0.4 (±0.1) 0.4 (±0.1) 0.6 (±0.2)
* Born during January 2000–July 2002.
† Born during January 2001–July 2003.
§ Born during February 2002–July 2004.
¶ Born during January 2003–June 2005 (2006 estimates based on National Immunization Survey dataset, which was rereleased on February 25, 2008, after correcting for
Hispanic overcount in nine states).
** Born during January 2004–July 2006.
†† Confi dence interval.
§§ Diphtheria, tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccines, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and any acellular pertussis vaccine.
¶¶ Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine.
*** Haemophilus infl uenzae type b (Hib) vaccine.
††† 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7).
§§§ ≥4 doses of DTaP, ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine, and ≥1 dose of any measles-containing vaccine.
¶¶¶ 4:3:1 plus ≥3 doses of Hib vaccine.
**** 4:3:1:3 plus ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine.
†††† 4:3:1:3:3 plus ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine.
§§§§ 4:3:1:3:3:1: plus ≥4 doses of PCV7.
Return to top.
Table 2

TABLE 2. Estimated vaccination coverage for the 4:3:1:3:3:1* and 4:3:1:3:3:1:4† vaccination series and selected individual vaccines
among children aged 19–35 months, by state and selected local areas — National Immunization Survey, United States, 2007§
≥4 DTaP¶ ≥1 MMR** ≥1 VAR†† ≥4 PCV7§§ 4:3:1:3:3:1 4:3:1:3:3:1:4
State/Area % (95% CI¶¶) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI)
United States 84.5 (±0.9) 92.3 (±0.7) 90.0 (±0.7) 75.3 (±1.2) 77.4 (±1.1) 66.5 (±1.3)
Alabama 85.4 (±5.2) 95.0 (±2.8) 92.0 (±4.5) 79.6 (±5.7) 78.2 (±6.3) 67.3 (±7.0)
Alaska 81.7 (±5.6) 89.7 (±4.1) 80.5 (±6.0) 80.9 (±6.0) 70.1 (±6.8) 64.4 (±7.3)
Arizona 85.4 (±5.7) 89.0 (±4.8) 86.0 (±5.4) 76.8 (±6.6) 75.2 (±6.7) 66.1 (±7.3)
Arkansas 78.8 (±5.8) 92.5 (±3.1) 89.2 (±4.2) 65.4 (±6.4) 72.3 (±6.2) 57.4 (±6.5)
California 84.9 (±4.0) 94.6 (±2.4) 93.2 (±2.6) 78.8 (±4.8) 77.1 (±4.7) 67.7 (±5.4)
Alameda County 83.1 (±5.4) 91.6 (±4.4) 89.6 (±4.5) 80.7 (±5.7) 76.3 (±5.8) 69.4 (±6.2)
Los Angeles County 84.0 (±5.3) 95.8 (±2.8) 93.9 (±3.3) 74.8 (±6.2) 78.0 (±5.9) 65.0 (±6.7)
San Bernardino County 74.8 (±6.2) 90.3 (±4.3) 89.8 (±4.4) 68.6 (±6.4) 69.6 (±6.5) 57.5 (±6.8)
Rest of state 86.4 (±5.8) 94.7 (±3.5) 93.5 (±3.8) 81.3 (±7.1) 77.4 (±7.0) 69.7 (±8.1)
Colorado 82.1 (±7.0) 91.2 (±4.5) 88.9 (±5.9) 70.7 (±8.7) 78.0 (±7.8) 64.3 (±9.1)
Connecticut 91.1 (±4.4) 95.3 (±2.8) 94.2 (±3.3) 88.8 (±4.9) 86.8 (±5.0) 81.2 (±5.9)
Delaware 86.9 (±4.5) 94.8 (±3.3) 92.1 (±3.8) 77.3 (±6.2) 80.3 (±5.7) 68.6 (±6.7)
District of Columbia 85.1 (±5.6) 95.2 (±3.3) 94.0 (±3.5) 77.5 (±6.2) 81.6 (±5.9) 71.0 (±6.7)
Florida 85.0 (±5.2) 92.3 (±4.1) 90.2 (±4.4) 66.1 (±6.7) 80.3 (±5.5) 61.8 (±6.8)
Miami-Dade County 86.0 (±5.0) 95.4 (±3.0) 90.8 (±4.5) 61.2 (±7.3) 76.1 (±6.3) 53.8 (±7.4)
Rest of state 84.9 (±6.0) 91.8 (±4.8) 90.1 (±5.1) 67.0 (±7.8) 81.0 (±6.4) 63.2 (±7.9)
Georgia 85.5 (±5.2) 91.4 (±4.2) 91.6 (±4.1) 75.5 (±6.7) 79.6 (±6.0) 65.9 (±7.2)
Hawaii 90.6 (±3.8) 93.8 (±3.7) 95.5 (±2.6) 80.7 (±5.8) 87.5 (±4.5) 77.4 (±6.1)
Idaho 77.2 (±6.3) 86.1 (±5.2) 75.5 (±6.4) 66.6 (±7.2) 65.6 (±7.2) 52.9 (±7.6)
Illinois 81.6 (±4.2) 93.1 (±2.7) 88.7 (±3.4) 76.0 (±4.5) 73.5 (±4.8) 65.8 (±5.0)
City of Chicago 78.2 (±6.4) 89.5 (±4.7) 88.8 (±4.2) 69.0 (±6.7) 71.0 (±6.7) 60.6 (±6.8)
Rest of state 82.7 (±5.2) 94.4 (±3.2) 88.7 (±4.4) 78.5 (±5.6) 74.4 (±6.0) 67.6 (±6.3)
Indiana 80.3 (±4.4) 90.4 (±3.3) 88.3 (±3.5) 70.4 (±5.2) 74.0 (±4.6) 61.8 (±5.3)
Marion County 80.8 (±5.2) 87.5 (±4.6) 86.0 (±4.6) 75.0 (±5.7) 71.4 (±5.9) 63.2 (±6.3)
Rest of state 80.2 (±5.2) 91.0 (±3.9) 88.8 (±4.2) 69.4 (±6.1) 74.5 (±5.4) 61.5 (±6.3)
Iowa 83.0 (±5.9) 93.0 (±3.8) 88.2 (±4.6) 72.3 (±6.6) 75.9 (±6.3) 64.2 (±6.9)
Kansas 87.0 (±4.9) 93.1 (±3.5) 88.7 (±4.1) 75.0 (±6.2) 76.0 (±6.0) 64.8 (±6.8)
Kentucky 85.2 (±5.8) 90.8 (±4.6) 87.9 (±5.1) 69.7 (±6.5) 78.2 (±6.2) 63.3 (±6.7)
Louisiana 80.1 (±5.9) 92.9 (±3.4) 91.5 (±3.7) 76.0 (±6.0) 77.0 (±6.1) 66.9 (±6.9)
Maine 86.7 (±5.4) 90.2 (±4.8) 85.5 (±5.3) 82.5 (±5.6) 72.9 (±6.9) 67.0 (±7.2)
Maryland 94.8 (±2.4) 97.1 (±2.0) 96.8 (±1.9) 84.4 (±5.9) 91.3 (±3.1) 79.9 (±6.2)
Massachusetts 90.0 (±5.0) 93.3 (±4.6) 87.4 (±5.6) 85.1 (±6.3) 77.9 (±7.3) 76.0 (±7.4)
Michigan 84.3 (±6.1) 89.5 (±5.3) 89.5 (±5.3) 71.1 (±7.4) 78.8 (±6.7) 66.9 (±7.5)
Minnesota 88.9 (±4.7) 94.9 (±2.8) 89.1 (±4.7) 82.1 (±6.2) 80.5 (±6.1) 72.8 (±6.9)
Mississippi 81.0 (±6.8) 87.2 (±5.8) 88.4 (±5.6) 65.8 (±7.8) 77.1 (±7.0) 61.2 (±7.9)
Missouri 80.6 (±6.5) 89.0 (±5.2) 89.4 (±5.0) 73.7 (±7.0) 76.1 (±6.9) 64.7 (±7.5)
Montana 79.1 (±5.8) 89.6 (±4.0) 78.5 (±5.8) 70.7 (±6.7) 65.3 (±6.9) 58.0 (±7.0)
Nebraska 87.8 (±5.3) 94.0 (±3.7) 93.8 (±3.8) 80.5 (±6.5) 82.9 (±6.0) 74.4 (±7.1)
Nevada 71.4 (±7.3) 86.3 (±4.9) 83.3 (±5.5) 61.7 (±7.5) 63.1 (±7.6) 50.7 (±7.5)
New Hampshire 94.4 (±3.5) 96.6 (±2.6) 95.2 (±3.1) 87.3 (±5.3) 90.6 (±4.3) 80.5 (±6.2)
New Jersey 85.3 (±5.9) 91.2 (±5.5) 92.5 (±4.8) 69.3 (±7.8) 80.5 (±6.4) 62.3 (±7.9)
New Mexico 81.6 (±7.0) 90.6 (±3.6) 88.8 (±3.9) 72.0 (±7.6) 76.0 (±7.2) 65.4 (±7.7)
New York 88.9 (±2.9) 93.6 (±2.1) 88.4 (±3.2) 75.1 (±4.5) 77.8 (±4.1) 65.2 (±4.9)
City of New York 84.7 (±4.5) 91.9 (±3.2) 89.0 (±3.9) 73.4 (±5.4) 76.3 (±5.3) 64.4 (±6.0)
Rest of state 92.8 (±3.8) 95.2 (±2.6) 87.8 (±5.1) 76.7 (±7.2) 79.1 (±6.3) 65.9 (±7.6)
North Carolina 85.8 (±5.0) 96.9 (±2.0) 93.3 (±4.1) 81.7 (±5.6) 77.3 (±6.5) 70.1 (±7.0)
North Dakota 85.5 (±4.9) 95.2 (±2.9) 91.5 (±3.8) 81.4 (±5.5) 77.2 (±5.7) 68.9 (±6.3)
Ohio 86.6 (±4.9) 90.7 (±3.7) 89.1 (±4.1) 74.7 (±6.0) 77.7 (±5.8) 64.5 (±6.5)
Oklahoma 82.7 (±6.0) 89.9 (±5.0) 89.7 (±5.0) 58.3 (±7.8) 78.5 (±6.3) 53.3 (±7.7)
Oregon 77.8 (±7.3) 88.9 (±5.3) 84.2 (±6.3) 70.1 (±7.5) 70.5 (±7.6) 62.7 (±7.8)
Pennsylvania 86.4 (±3.6) 93.8 (±2.5) 91.9 (±2.8) 79.1 (±4.4) 78.8 (±4.3) 68.3 (±4.9)
Philadelphia County 88.3 (±5.4) 92.2 (±4.5) 91.8 (±4.4) 81.2 (±6.5) 82.2 (±6.2) 73.0 (±7.3)
Rest of state 86.0 (±4.2) 94.1 (±2.8) 92.0 (±3.2) 78.8 (±5.1) 78.2 (±4.9) 67.5 (±5.7)
Rhode Island 84.9 (±6.1) 94.7 (±3.9) 92.1 (±4.1) 90.7 (±4.4) 75.0 (±7.0) 69.2 (±7.4)
South Carolina 84.2 (±4.5) 92.5 (±3.2) 91.5 (±3.3) 80.8 (±4.8) 79.5 (±5.0) 74.9 (±5.3)
South Dakota 88.7 (±4.5) 95.0 (±2.4) 85.3 (±5.2) 54.3 (±7.4) 76.9 (±6.1) 45.8 (±7.4)
* Includes ≥4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus toxoid, and any acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) (also can include diphtheria and tetanus toxoid vaccine or diphtheria, tetanus toxoid,
and pertussis vaccine); ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine; ≥1 dose of any measles-containing vaccine; ≥3 doses of Haemophilus infl uenzae type b vaccine; ≥3 doses of hepatitis B
vaccine; and ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine.
† 4:3:1:3:3:1 plus ≥4 doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7).
§ Children in the 2007 National Immunization Survey were born during January 2004–July 2006.
¶ ≥4 doses of DTaP.
** ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine.
†† ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine at or after child’s fi rst birthday.
§§ ≥3 doses of PCV7.
¶¶ Confi dence interval.

individual vaccines among children aged 19–35 months, by state and selected local areas — National Immunization Survey,
United States, 2007§
≥4 DTaP¶ ≥1 MMR** ≥1 VAR†† ≥4 PCV7§§ 4:3:1:3:3:1 4:3:1:3:3:1:4
State/Area % (95% CI¶¶) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI)
Tennessee 84.8 (±6.0) 94.5 (±4.3) 92.3 (±4.7) 72.6 (±7.5) 78.7 (±6.7) 64.3 (±7.7)
Texas 82.1 (±3.5) 90.4 (±2.6) 90.0 (±2.6) 75.7 (±4.0) 77.3 (±3.8) 68.5 (±4.4)
Bexar County 85.5 (±4.8) 90.9 (±3.9) 88.8 (±4.3) 79.1 (±5.5) 80.1 (±5.3) 74.0 (±5.8)
City of Houston 77.9 (±5.6) 89.4 (±3.8) 89.6 (±3.8) 71.6 (±5.9) 73.0 (±5.7) 64.1 (±6.2)
Dallas County 77.0 (±6.0) 89.9 (±4.1) 90.0 (±4.1) 70.8 (±6.3) 71.9 (±6.2) 61.0 (±6.8)
El Paso County 81.8 (±5.7) 90.3 (±4.8) 91.1 (±4.7) 69.3 (±6.9) 77.4 (±6.2) 63.1 (±7.1)
Rest of state 83.4 (±5.1) 90.6 (±3.8) 90.2 (±3.8) 77.4 (±5.8) 78.7 (±5.6) 70.4 (±6.4)
Utah 82.2 (±5.3) 90.9 (±4.0) 86.6 (±4.8) 70.7 (±6.4) 73.6 (±6.1) 61.4 (±6.8)
Vermont 81.9 (±7.5) 93.6 (±5.2) 77.6 (±7.8) 84.2 (±7.0) 67.3 (±8.3) 62.7 (±8.5)
Virginia 84.1 (±4.8) 90.9 (±3.8) 87.8 (±4.5) 79.1 (±5.1) 75.5 (±5.7) 67.9 (±6.1)
Washington 80.9 (±5.4) 90.5 (±3.9) 84.0 (±4.9) 73.8 (±6.0) 69.0 (±6.1) 64.6 (±6.2)
Western Washington 88.1 (±4.8) 91.9 (±3.9) 80.8 (±5.9) 82.3 (±5.8) 71.3 (±6.7) 66.8 (±7.0)
Rest of state 79.3 (±6.4) 90.2 (±4.6) 84.8 (±5.8) 71.9 (±7.2) 68.4 (±7.3) 64.1 (±7.4)
West Virginia 84.5 (±4.9) 96.2 (±2.1) 89.2 (±3.8) 75.8 (±5.7) 75.5 (±5.6) 64.9 (±6.2)
Wisconsin 82.0 (±6.1) 91.4 (±4.6) 86.7 (±5.4) 78.7 (±6.5) 77.1 (±6.6) 69.6 (±7.2)
Wyoming 78.7 (±6.1) 87.5 (±5.2) 78.5 (±6.3) 68.0 (±6.7) 70.2 (±6.8) 58.7 (±7.1)
Return to top.
Table 3

TABLE 3. Estimated vaccination coverage among children aged 19–35 months, by selected vaccines and dosages, race/ethnicity,*
and poverty level† — National Immunization Survey, United States, 2007§
White Black Hispanic
American
Indian/
Alaska Native Asian
Below
poverty level
At or above
poverty level
Vaccine % (95% CI¶) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI) % (95% CI)
DTaP**
≥3 doses 95.5 (±0.7) 93.9 (±1.8) 96.1 (±1.1) 97.3 (±2.9) 96.4 (±2.4) 94.1 (±1.2) 96.0 (±0.6)
≥4 doses 85.3 (±1.2) 82.3 (±2.7) 83.8 (±2.2) 86.4 (±7.1) 87.5 (±4.0) 81.1 (±2.1) 85.9 (±1.1)
Poliovirus 92.6 (±0.9) 91.1 (±2.1) 93.0 (±1.6) 94.8 (±5.5) 95.0 (±2.6) 91.9 (±1.3) 92.8 (±0.9)
MMR†† ≥1 dose 92.1 (±0.8) 91.5 (±2.0) 92.6 (±1.6) 96.2 (±3.2) 93.9 (±3.5) 91.3 (±1.4) 92.6 (±0.8)
Hib§§ ≥3 doses 92.9 (±0.9) 90.8 (±2.2) 93.5 (±1.4) 95.0 (±4.1) 91.0 (±3.4) 91.0 (±1.5) 93.1 (±0.8)
Hepatitis B ≥3 doses 92.5 (±0.9) 91.2 (±2.1) 93.6 (±1.6) 96.7 (±3.0) 93.8 (±2.9) 92.1 (±1.4) 92.9 (±0.9)
Varicella ≥1 dose 89.2 (±1.0) 89.8 (±2.2) 90.6 (±1.7) 94.9 (±3.5) 93.7 (±2.9) 89.2 (±1.6) 90.1 (±0.9)
PCV7¶¶
≥3 doses 89.8 (±0.9) 89.5 (±2.2) 91.0 (±1.7) 94.0 (±4.3) 86.8 (±4.7) 89.0 (±1.6) 90.3 (±0.9)
≥4 doses 76.6 (±1.4) 70.3 (±3.4) 75.4 (±2.6) 80.4 (±7.1) 75.0 (±5.9) 72.8 (±2.4) 76.3 (±1.4)
Combined series
4:3:1:3*** 82.6 (±1.2) 79.5 (±2.9) 81.5 (±2.3) 85.3 (±7.2) 81.9 (±5.1) 78.8 (±2.2) 82.9 (±1.2)
4:3:1:3:3††† 81.0 (±1.3) 77.5 (±3.1) 79.8 (±2.4) 85.1 (±7.3) 80.7 (±5.2) 76.9 (±2.3) 81.4 (±1.2)
4:3:1:3:3:1§§§ 77.5 (±1.3) 75.3 (±3.2) 78.0 (±2.5) 82.7 (±7.5) 79.4 (±5.3) 75.0 (±2.3) 78.2 (±1.3)
4:3:1:3:3:1:4¶¶¶ 67.0 (±1.6) 62.0 (±3.6) 67.0 (±2.8) 74.6 (±8.4) 68.6 (±6.5) 64.7 (±2.7) 66.9 (±1.5)
* Persons identifi ed as white, black, Asian, or American Indian/Alaska Native are all non-Hispanic. Persons identifi ed as Hispanic might be of any race. Native Hawaiian or other
Pacifi c Islanders and multiple races were not included because of small sample sizes.
† Poverty status was based on 2006 U.S. Census poverty thresholds (available at http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty.html).
§ Children in the 2007 National Immunization Survey were born during January 2004–July 2006.
¶ Confi dence interval.
** Diphtheria, tetanus toxoid, and any acellular pertussis vaccine, which can include diphtheria and tetanus toxoid vaccine or diphtheria, tetanus toxoid, and pertussis vaccine.
†† Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine.
§§ Haemophilus infl uenzae type b (Hib) vaccine.
¶¶ 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7).
*** ≥4 doses of DTP/DT/DTaP, ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine, and ≥1 dose of any measles-containing vaccine, and ≥3 doses of Hib vaccine.
††† 4:3:1:3 plus ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine.
§§§ 4:3:1:3:3 plus ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine.
¶¶¶ 4:3:1:3:3:1 plus ≥4 doses of PCV7.
Return to top.



Use of trade names and commercial sources is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

References to non-CDC sites on the Internet are provided as a service to MMWR readers and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CDC is not responsible for the content of pages found at these sites. URL addresses listed in MMWR were current as of the date of publication.


All MMWR HTML versions of articles are electronic conversions from typeset documents. This conversion might result in character translation or format errors in the HTML version. Users are referred to the electronic PDF version (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr) and/or the original MMWR paper copy for printable versions of official text, figures, and tables. An original paper copy of this issue can be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington, DC 20402-9371; telephone: (202) 512-1800. Contact GPO for current prices.

**Questions or messages regarding errors in formatting should be addressed to mmwrq@cdc.gov.

 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #