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QuickStats: Percentage of U.S. and Canadian Women Aged 50--69 Years Who Were Screened in Accordance with National Screening Guidelines for Papanicolaou (Pap) Tests and Mammograms,* by Country and Health Insurance Status, 2002--2003

Quickstats

* Pap tests: Both the American Cancer Society and U.S. National Cancer Institute recommend that all women begin cervical cancer screening approximately 3 years after they begin having vaginal intercourse, or when they are aged 21 years. Screening should be conducted every 1--3 years depending on age and previous Pap test results. The Canadian Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute of Canada recommend that sexually active women be screened every 1--3 years until age 69 years. Mammograms: The American Cancer Society recommends that women aged >40 years have a mammogram every year; the U.S. National Cancer Institute recommends that women aged >40 years have one every 1--2 years. Both the Canadian Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute of Canada recommend that women aged 50--69 years have a mammogram every 2 years. The analyses presented here are based on women aged >50 years and used recommendations from the U.S. National Cancer Institute (for U.S. respondents).

During 2002--2003, the United States and Canada had similar national guidelines for Pap test and mammogram screening for women aged >50 years. Approximately 85% of U.S. women aged 50--69 years met the guidelines for Pap tests, compared with 70% of Canadian women in this age group. The rate among Canadian women was comparable to that of uninsured U.S. women. Nearly 82% of U.S. women aged 50--69 years met the U.S. recommendations for mammogram screening, whereas 74% of Canadian women in this age group met the Canadian guidelines. More than half (55%) of uninsured U.S. women aged 50--69 years received mammograms on the recommended schedule.

Source: Powell-Griner E, Blackwell DL, Martinez M. Health profiles of noninstitutionalized senior citizens in the U.S. and Canada: findings from the Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health (JCUSH). Presented at the Population Association of America meetings, Philadelphia, PA; April 2005.



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