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Notice to Readers : Escherichia coli O157:H7 Outbreak in Foodborne Disease Computer-Based Case Study Series

CDC announces the release of a new computer-based case study, "E. coli O157:H7 Infection in Michigan." Based on a real-life disease outbreak investigation, this self-instructional, interactive exercise teaches public health practitioners epidemiologic skills and allows them to practice these skills. In the case study, students work through the E. coli O157:H7 investigation from beginning to end. Students can select learning activities focusing on particular areas of interest or those most relevant to their job activities.

The new case study is the second in the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Investigation Case Study Series. The first computer-based case study, "Botulism in Argentina," was released in 2002 and received the American Society for Training and Development's E-Learning Courseware Certification and the 2002 Outstanding Practice Award from the Design and Development Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology.

The Foodborne Disease Outbreak Investigation Series is designed for students with knowledge of basic epidemiologic and public health concepts. Each case study was developed in collaboration with the original investigators from CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Both "E. coli O157:H7 Infection in Michigan" and "Botulism in Argentina" can be downloaded free of charge at
http://www.phppo.cdc.gov/phtn/casestudies or purchased on CD-ROM through the Public Health Training Network. Continuing education credit is offered to those who complete the case studies.



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