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MMWR
Synopsis for July 1, 2005

The MMWR is embargoed until Thursday, 12 PM EDT.

  1. Annual Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity Losses ― United States, 1997-2001
  2. Heated-Related Mortality ― Arizona, 1993-2002, and United States, 1979-2002
  3. Update: Influenza Activity ― United States and Worldwide, 2004-05 Season
There is no MMWR Telebriefing scheduled for June 30, 2005

Annual Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity Losses ― United States, 1997-2001

Cigarette smoking continues to impose substantial health and financial costs on individuals and society. Implementation of comprehensive tobacco-control programs as recommended by CDC could reduce smoking prevalence and related health care costs.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 488-5131
 

A study published in the July 1 issue of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, reports deaths from smoking cost the nation about $92 billion in the form of lost productivity. This amount plus smoking-related health-care costs, which was estimated at $75.5 billion in 1998, exceed $167 billion per year in the United States. The report also finds that during 1997-2001 an estimated 438,000 deaths in the United States occur each year as a result of smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke. The three leading causes of smoking-attributable death were lung cancer (123,836), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (90,582), and ischemic heart disease (86,801).

Heated-Related Mortality ― Arizona, 1993-2002, and United States, 1979-2002

Heat-related deaths are preventable. By understanding the risks exposure to prolonged periods of high temperatures, and taking preventive measures, people can reduce their risk of heat-related death. For more information on extreme heat, visit http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/index.asp.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(404) 498-0070
 

Most heat-related deaths occur during the summer months and the elderly, the very young, and people with chronic health problems are most at risk. In addition, anyone may be at risk for fatal heatstroke if sufficiently exposed, particularly people who live in warm weather climates with regular periods of intense summertime heat. All heat-related illnesses and deaths are preventable. To assess the health risk from heat-related deaths and illnesses, Arizona health practitioners and CDC researched cases of heat-related death and illness in Arizona. Findings indicated that during 19792002, a total of 4,780 deaths in the United States were heat related. During 19932002, the numbers of deaths were three to seven times greater in Arizona than in the United States overall. The Arizona cases described in this report show the range disease caused by exposure to excessive heat. Public health agencies in communities affected by periods of extreme heat should educate populations at risk and consider designing and implementing location-specific heat response plans (HRPs).

Update: Influenza Activity ― United States and Worldwide, 2004-05 Season

During the 200405 influenza season, influenza A (H1)*, A (H3N2), and B viruses cocirculated worldwide, and influenza A (H3N2) viruses predominated.

PRESS CONTACT:
David Daigle

Office of Communications
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639-1143
 

This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States and worldwide during the 200405 influenza season. During the 200405 influenza season, influenza A (H1)*, A (H3N2), and B viruses cocirculated worldwide, and influenza A (H3N2) viruses predominated. In addition, several Asian countries continued to report widespread outbreaks of avian influenza A (H5N1) among poultry; in Vietnam, Thailand, and Cambodia, these outbreaks were associated with severe illnesses and deaths among humans. In the United States, the 200405 influenza season peaked in February, was moderate, and was associated predominantly with influenza A (H3N2) viruses.


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This page last reviewed June 30, 2005
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n050701.htm

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