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MMWR
Synopsis for May 27, 2005

The MMWR is embargoed until Thursday, 12 PM EDT.

  1. Tobacco Use and Cessation Counseling ― Global Health Professionals Survey Pilot Study, 10 Countries, 2005
  2. Cigarette Smoking Among Adults ― United States, 2003
  3. Blood Lead Levels ― United States 1999-2002
There is no MMWR Telebriefing scheduled for May 26, 2005

Tobacco Use and Cessation Counseling ― Global Health Professionals Survey Pilot Study, 10 Countries, 2005

Health care professionals play an important role in preventing and reducing tobacco use and are encouraged to provide patients with information about the health consequences of smoking, assist them with quitting, and serve as role models to promote a tobacco-free lifestyle.

PRESS CONTACT:
Wick Warren, Ph.D.

Researcher
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 488-5131
 

A new study published in the May 27 issue of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, shows that while the majority (72 percent 99 percent) of dental, medical, nursing and pharmacy students from 10 countries believe they should receive training in counseling patients to quit smoking, only a small percentage (5 percent 37 percent) say they are receiving formal training to do that. In addition, the report finds current smoking rates among third-year health profession students is above 20 percent in seven of the 10 countries surveyed. The Global Health Professional Survey is the first of its kind to collect data on tobacco use by health profession students from Albania, Argentina, Bangladesh, Bosnia Croatia, Egypt, India, Philippines, Serbia and Uganda, as well as their attitudes toward tobacco use and about receiving training in smoking cessation counseling.

Cigarette Smoking Among Adults ― United States, 2003

While overall smoking prevalence is declining, the higher prevalence among disadvantaged subgroups calls for, within the framework of comprehensive tobacco prevention and control programs, more efforts and programs to better reach diverse populations.

PRESS CONTACT:
Dave Nelson, M.D., M.S.
(available on Thursday May, 26, 2005)
Senior Scientific Advisor
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 488-5131

Corinne Husten, M.D.
(available on Friday May, 27, 2005)
Medical Officer
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 488-5131
 

A study published in the May 27 issue of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, reporting information from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), finds that approximately 21.6 percent of U.S. adults over 45 million people are current smokers; down from 22.5 percent in 2002 and 22.8 percent in 2001. The study also found that the 46 million adults who have quit smoking outnumber the 45 million people who continue to smoke the second straight year this has happened. The study points out that more efforts and programs are needed to reduce the continuing disparities in cigarette smoking by age, race/ethnicity and educational levels.

 

Blood Lead Levels ― United States 1999-2002

Blood lead levels have continued to decline in the U.S., although an estimated 310,000 young children are still at risk for exposure to harmful levels of lead.

PRESS CONTACT:
Debra J. Brody

CDC, National Center for Health Statistics
(301) 458-4800
 

Over the past 30 years, there has been a dramatic decline, nationwide, in blood lead levels (BLLs). Findings from the most recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999 2002, indicate that BLLs are continuing to decrease across all age and racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. The overall prevalence of elevated BLLs (> 10 g/dL) for the US population was 0.7 percent. An estimated 310,000 children, 1-5 years, are still at risk for exposure to harmful lead levels. Although BLLs remained higher for young non-Hispanic black children, this group also experienced the greatest decline (72 percent) in elevated BLLs since1991-1994. The national health objective for 2010 is to eliminate all elevated BLLs in children. Continued attention to identify remaining lead hazards is necessary to meet this goal.
 


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This page last reviewed May 26, 2005
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