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MMWR
Synopsis for October 1, 2004

The MMWR is embargoed until Thursday, 12 PM EDT.

  1. High-Risk Sexual Behavior by HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men ― 16 Sites, United States, 2000-2002
  2. Imported Lassa Fever ― New Jersey, 2004
  3. Emergency Measles Control Activities ― Darfur, Sudan, 2004
  4. West Nile Virus Activity ― United States, September 22-28, 2004
No MMWR Telebriefing is scheduled for Thursday, September 30, 2004

Synopsis for October 1, 2004

High-Risk Sexual Behavior by HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men ― 16 Sites, United States, 2000-2002

New CDC data show that most HIV-positive gay and bisexual men are taking steps to reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to their sexual partners.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895

 

In a survey of more than 1900 men who have sex with men, 31 percent reported abstaining from sex for the previous year. Among sexually active men, more reported having oral sex at last sexual encounter than anal sex (85 percent and 68 percent, respectively). Additionally, when having sex with HIV-negative partners, the men surveyed were significantly less likely to have insertive anal intercourse (IAI) and 3.5 times more likely to use condoms than when having sex with HIV-positive partners. While safer practices were the norm, of those men reporting IAI, 14 percent had unprotected IAI during their last sexual encounter with a negative partner and 25 percent had unprotected IAI with a partner of unknown status. Authors note that helping HIV-positive people maintain safer behaviors over the long haul is critical. CDC recommends that health care providers routinely deliver prevention messages and STD screening to those living with HIV. More intensive efforts may be necessary for some.

 

Imported Lassa Fever ― New Jersey, 2004

Physicians increasingly must consider the possibility of exotic diseases in patients who have a history of travel to areas where such diseases are found.

PRESS CONTACT:
Esther Tan, MBBS, MPH

New Jersey Dept of Health and Senior Services
(609) 584 5098

 

Geographic barriers such as oceans and distance once limited the spread of diseases. Modern, international air travel has made it easier for exotic diseases to be moved around the world. When a patient becomes ill after travel to places where such diseases are found, it is important for physicians to consider not only common causes of travel-related illness, such as malaria and typhoid fever, but also relatively rare infectious diseases such as Lassa fever.

 

Emergency Measles Control Activities ―
Darfur, Sudan, 2004

Measles control is a priority health intervention in areas affected by conflict and in these situations, a collaborative effort by stakeholders can lead to a successful mass vaccination campaign thereby rapidly reducing measles transmission.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 639-8487

 

The Darfur region in Sudan is in the midst of a civil conflict with population displacement and disruption of public health infrastructure. Since March 2004, measles outbreaks with high case fatality have been reported in the region. In response, the Federal Ministry of Health in Sudan, in partnership with international agencies conducted a mass measles vaccination campaign targeting children aged 9 months 15 years in Darfur. The campaign vaccinated over 75 percent of the target population of 2.6 million children and resulted in a decrease in reported measles cases. This demonstrates that adequate planning and collaboration between stakeholders can result in a successful vaccination campaign in a conflict affected area. Lessons learnt in Darfur will be useful in planning measles control activities in other such situations.

 

West Nile Virus Activity ― United States,
September 22-28, 2004

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communications
(404) 639-3286

 

No summary available.

 

 

 

 

 


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This page last reviewed September 30, 2004
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n041001.htm

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