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Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394

 


MMWR
Synopsis for August 1, 2003

The MMWR is embargoed until NOON ET, Thursdays.

  1. Injury Mortality Among American Indian and Alaska Native Children and Youth United States, 19891998
  2. Diabetes Prevalence Among American Indians/Alaska Natives and the Overall U.S. Population 19942002
  3. Cancer Mortality Among American Indians and Alaska Natives United States, 1994 1998
  4. Bronchiolitis-Associated Outpatient Visits and Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native Children United States, 19962000
  5. Vaccination Coverage Levels Among Alaska Native Children Aged 1935 Months National Immunization Survey, United States, 20002001
  6. West Nile Virus Activity United States, July 2430, 2003

MMWR Surveillance Summaries
August 1, 2003/Vol. 52/No. 7

Surveillance for Health Behaviors of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 19972000

Contact: Clark Denny, PhD
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4882499
 

MMWR Telebriefing for July 31, 2003
WHO: Dr. W. Craig Vanderwagen, Chief Medical Officer (Acting), HHS Indian Health Service (by phone), and Dr. Christine Branche, Director, CDC's Injury Center
WHAT: News conference to discuss disparities in health experienced by American Indians and Alaskan Natives.
WHEN: Thursday, July 31, 2003
NOON PM ET

Brief remarks followed by Q/A.
WHERE: CDC
1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta
Building 16, enter via Clifton Way parking deck

Parking is available in the Building 16 parking deck located on Clifton Way. Media must arrive at Building 16 entrance by 11:30 pm for access to the briefing. Media must present photo ID for access.

Media who cannot attend in-person, may listen and ask questions by toll-free conference line. The briefing will begin promptly and it is recommended that media dial-in a few minutes prior to the start of the conference.

Teleconference name: CDC

U.S. Media Dial 866-254-5942
This briefing will also be audio webcast. Listen LIVE online at www.cdc.gov/media.

A full transcript of this teleconference will be available following the teleconference on the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/media.

Synopsis for August 1, 2003

Injury Mortality Among American Indian and Alaska Native Children and Youth United States, 19891998

Native American children and youth are at greater risk of preventable injury-related death than other children in America.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications Resources

CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
(770) 4884902
 

This CDC study found that injuries and violence account for 75 percent of all deaths among children and youth from one to 19 years old in this population. The risk of injury-related death is about twice that of all children and youth in the country and the risk for Native Americans varies from one region of the country to another. CDC researchers found that more than 3300 Native American children and youth living on or near reservations died as a result of injuries or violence between 1989 and 1998. While injury death rates declined for motor vehicle crashes (18 percent), drowning (34 percent), fire (49 percent), and pedestrian incidents (56 percent); rates increased for firearm-related deaths (13 percent) and homicide (20 percent). Because each Native American community is unique, CDC researchers recommend that addressing local practices and cultures can help future prevention measures to narrow the injury disparity gap with other children in America.

 

Diabetes Prevalence Among American Indians/Alaska Natives and the Overall U.S. Population 19942002

Diabetes continues to disproportionately affect American Indians and Alaska Natives compared with the overall U.S. population.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4885131
 

Diabetes is also becoming more common in both populations and has emerged as a public health concern for young populations in several racial and ethnic groups, including American Indians and Alaska Natives. Earlier onset increases the lifetime duration of the disease and the risk for costly and disabling diabetes-related complications. There are also health concerns for young women of child-bearing age because the offspring of women, who had diabetes during pregnancy, may be at increased risk of developing the disease. Among persons with diabetes, appropriate health care practices (e.g., aggressive control of high blood sugar and high blood pressure) have been shown to prevent or delay diabetes-related complications such as eye disease, kidney disease, or nerve damage.

 

Cancer Mortality Among American Indians and Alaska Natives United States, 1994 1998

Overall, the cancer death rate among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) was lower than the U.S. cancer mortality rate for all races combined.

PRESS CONTACT:
David Epsey

Indian Health Service
(505) 2484435
 

However, the aforementioned findings obscure important regional differences in cancer mortality, particularly lung and colorectal cancer. The AI/AN population of the Northern Plains region and Alaska have higher cancer mortality rates when compared to all races combined in the US. Higher colorectal cancer and lung cancer mortality rates are largely responsible for this difference, though deaths due to cancer of the stomach, liver and gallbladder are also elevated in those 2 regions. Lung cancer deaths in AI/ANs in the American Southwest were very low, a finding related to little tobacco use in that area by the Native population. These findings are important indicators of where efforts should be directed to address cancer in AI/ANs, the second leading cause of death in this population. In particular, they point the need to emphasize tobacco control programs and colorectal cancer screening programs in the Northern Plains and in Alaska.

 

Bronchiolitis-Associated Outpatient Visits and Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native Children United States, 19962000

Bronchiolitis is a significant cause of morbidity in American Indian/Alaska Native children and efforts must be made to develop preventive programs.

PRESS CONTACT:
Robert Holman, MS

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6392433
(Alternate: Jai Lingappa, MD, 4046392680)
 

This report shows a disproportionate burden of outpatient and inpatient bronchiolitis-associated disease in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children relative to other U.S. children. Overall, bronchiolitis-associated hospitalization rates continue to increase for children in the United States, despite the availability of effective preventive therapies in high-risk, premature infants for the most common etiology of bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Continued efforts are needed to develop and implement targeted preventive strategies for bronchiolitis among all children and especially those in AI/AN communities.

 

Vaccination Coverage Levels Among Alaska Native Children Aged 1935 Months National Immunization Survey, United States, 20002001

Immunization coverage among Alaska Native children is high.

PRESS CONTACT:
Tammy Santibanez, PhD

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398304
 

This report indicates that Alaska Native (AN) children aged 1935 months have a high level of vaccination coverage that exceeds the national goal for 2010 of 90% for all vaccines except varicella and the fourth dose of DTP. This achievement, despite the presence of barriers to vaccination, demonstrates the commitment of AN communities, tribal corporations, and state public health to address health concerns and exemplifies the effectiveness of using multiple strategies (e.g., reducing financial and access barriers, making vaccination a priority, using collaborative efforts, tracking and recall, assessment, and registries).

 

West Nile Virus Activity United States, July 2430, 2003

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286
 

No summary available.

 

 

 

 


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