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MMWR
Synopsis for March 21, 2003

The MMWR is embargoed until NOON ET, Thursdays.

  1. Trends in Tuberculosis Morbidity -- United States, 1992-2002
  2. Transmission of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis with Failed Completion of Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection -- Chickasaw County, Mississippi, June 1999-March 2002
  3. Update: Influenza Activity -- United States, 2002-03 Season
  4. Outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome -- Worldwide, 2003
  5. Absence of Transmission of the d9 Measles Virus -- Region of the Americas, November 2002-March 2003
No telebriefing is scheduled for Thursday, March 20, 2003

Synopsis for March 21, 2003

Trends in Tuberculosis Morbidity -- United States, 1992-2002

Disparities in TB persist despite overall U.S. declines.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895
 

Continued declines in tuberculosis (TB) cases in the United States mask large disparities between the majority of U.S. residents and those most severely affected by TB: African Americans and foreign-born individuals. In 2002, TB cases declined nearly 6 percent from 2001, reaching an all time low of 15,078. Despite this decline, TB rates among people born in the U.S. differed remarkably by race rates among African Americans remained nearly eight times higher than rates among whites and two times higher than rates among Latinos. Furthermore, the gap in TB rates between U.S.-born and foreign-born individuals has doubled over the last decade, with half of new cases occurring among foreign-born individuals. Since African Americans and foreign-born individuals accounted for three-fourths of 2002 TB cases, narrowing the gap in TB rates is a critical factor in achieving TB elimination. CDC is strengthening collaborations with national and international health partners and is identifying innovative strategies to improve screening and treatment among high-risk African Americans.

 

Transmission of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis with Failed Completion of Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection -- Chickasaw County, Mississippi, June 1999-March 2002

An investigation into high rates of TB in Chickasaw County, Mississippi found that too few individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI), the inactive form of the disease, completed preventative treatment.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895
 

While management of the 16 TB cases reported in Chickasaw County from June 1999 to March 2002 was thorough and effective, only about half of exposed individuals with LTBI completed appropriate treatment regimens (54%). Several of those with untreated LTBI developed active TB and became the source of additional TB cases. During focus groups, patients cited stigma from the community and family members and a lack of information about the importance of LTBI treatment as important reasons for non-completion. Health officials have engaged community leaders to disseminate TB-related educational messages and are working with patients individually to provide information and support. To improve LTBI treatment completion, health departments may use a similar focus group format to identify and address specific treatment barriers in their communities.

 

Update: Influenza Activity -- United States, 2002-03 Season

Influenza activity in the United States peaked during early February, but influenza viruses continue to circulate.

PRESS CONTACT:
Lynnette Brammer, MPH

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639-3747
 

Influenza activity has been mild in the United States this season overall but has varied by region. The flu season appears to have peaked during early February, but influenza viruses continue to circulate in the United States. Overall, influenza type B viruses have predominated but influenza type A viruses have been more frequently identified than influenza B during late February and early March.

 

Outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome -- Worldwide, 2003

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286
 

Summary not available.

 

 

 

 

Absence of Transmission of the d9 Measles Virus -- Region of the Americas, November 2002-March 2003

In 1994, countries in the Region of the Americas set a goal to interrupt indigenous measles transmission.

PRESS CONTACT:
Rebecca Prevots, MD

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 639-8115
 

As of March 16, 2003, the Region of the Americas has been from for 17 weeks from known circulation of the d9 measles virus, the strain responsible for the only large outbreak of measles in the region during 2002. However, measles is still endemic in other regions, and sporadic cases continue to occur in the Region of the Americas because of importation.

 


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