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MMWR
Synopsis for February 22, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until NOON, ET.

  1. Laboratory-Acquired Meningococcal Disease United States, 2000
  2. Populations Receiving Optimally Fluoridated Public Drinking Water United States, 2000
  3. The Socioeconomic Status of Women with Diabetes United States, 2000

Telebriefing, February 21, 2002
WHO: Dr. William Maas, CDC water fluoridation expert and Dr. Gloria Beckles and Ms. Patricia Thompson-Reid, CDC diabetes experts.
WHAT: To discuss articles in this week's MMWR on water fluoridation and diabetes, respectively. Brief remarks followed by Q/A.
WHEN: Thursday, February 21, 2002; 12 Noon 12:30 PM ET
WHERE: At your desk, by toll-free conference line: Dial 866-254-5942
Teleconference name: CDC
A full transcript of this teleconference will be available today following the teleconference on the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/media.

This teleconference will also be audio webcast. Listen LIVE online at www.cdc.gov/media.

Synopsis for February 22, 2002

Laboratory-Acquired Meningococcal Disease United States, 2000

Laboratory workers need to be aware of their increased risk of meningococcal disease in the laboratory setting.

PRESS CONTACT:
James J. Sejvar, MD

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6390887

 
Infection by Neisseria meningitidis in the course of laboratory work represents a significant occupational hazard to microbiologists. This data suggests that both the attack rate and the overall case-fatality rate of meningococcal disease among microbiologists in the United States were significantly higher than that in the general population. This report presents two probable cases of fatal laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease. Prevention of this disease among microbiologists includes minimizing the risk for exposure to aerosols and droplets, and strict adherence to these safety precautions. Primary prevention should focus on laboratory safety; however, vaccination of microbiologists may be used as an adjunctive measure.

 

Populations Receiving Optimally Fluoridated Public Drinking Water United States, 2000

There is considerable need, as well as opportunity, for additional communities to implement water fluoridation.

PRESS CONTACT:
William Maas, D.D.S, M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 4885301
 
This report provides the most recent information on the status of water fluoridation by States. Between 1992 and 2000, the percent of the U.S. population receiving fluoridated water increased from 62.1 percent to 65.8 percent, bringing the total U.S. population receiving fluoridated water to 162 million. The Healthy People 2010 national health initiative has set an objective for 75 percent of the U.S. population on public water systems to receive fluoridated water. Between 1992 and 2001, five additional states (Delaware, Maine, Missouri, Nebraska and Virginia) achieved the Healthy People objectives, and Oklahoma was close (74.6 percent) to achieving this goal. Twenty-six states and the District of Columbia have now met this objective. State-specific percentages range from 2 percent to 100 percent of persons on public water systems that receive optimally fluoridated water.

 

The Socioeconomic Status of Women with Diabetes United States, 2000

Many women with diabetes live in socioeconomic circumstances that limit their ability to receive treatment to reduce their risks of complications and early death.

PRESS CONTACT:
Gloria Beckles, M.D., MSc.

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 4881272
 
Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System indicate that women with diabetes are twice as likely as women without diabetes to live in poor socioeconomic circumstances. In 2000, 1 in 4 women with diabetes had not completed high school and 40% lived in households with annual income less than $25,000.These estimates remained unchanged after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and living arrangements (marital status, size of household, employment status). The findings suggest that the socioeconomic circumstances of a large number of women with diabetes might compromise their ability to benefit from treatments now available to reduce their risks of complications and early death. CDC has initiated several activities that focus on the needs of women with diabetes.

 


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