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MMWR
Synopsis for January 24, 2002

PLEASE NOTE: CDC has changed the embargo
for MMWR articles from 4pm EST to noon EST.

  1. Recent trends in Mortality Rates for Four Major Cancers by Sex and Race/Ethnicity-United States, 1990-1998
  2. Immunization Registry Use and Progress-United States, 2001
  3. Emergency Medical System Responses to Suicide-Related Calls -- Maine, November 1999-October 2000
MEDIA TELEBRIEFING
WHO: Ken Keppel, PhD, CDC statistician
Phyllis Wingo, MD, CDC cancer expert
WHAT: To discuss two CDC reports released today describing trends in racial and ethnic disparities in key measures of health including:
  • "Trends in Racial and Ethnic-Specific Rates for the Health Status Indicators: United States, 1990-98," an update on CDC's efforts tracking a wide range of major health outcomes,

  • The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) article, "Trends in Death Rates for Four Major Cancers by Race, Ethnicity, and Sex- United States, 1990-98."
WHEN: Thursday, January 24, 2002; 12 Noon - 12:45 PM ET
WHERE: At your desk, by toll-free conference line: Dial 866-254-5942
Conference name: CDC

Notice to Readers: Evaluation of Postexposure Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Anthrax


Synopsis for January 24, 2002

Recent trends in Mortality Rates for Four Major Cancers by Sex and Race/Ethnicity-United States, 1990-1998

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Phyllis A. Wingo
770-488-4783
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

 

Death rates from cancers of the lung, colon and rectum and breast decreased during the 1990s, due in part to lower prevalence of smoking, early detection and more effective treatments. Death rates from prostate cancer are also decreasing but the reasons for this are not clear. Success in reducing cancer death rates, however, has not been shared equally by all racial and ethnic groups and between men and women. Differences in cancer death rates among racial and ethnic groups, and men and women, result from a combination of factors such as health behaviors including smoking and nutrition; access to comprehensive health care, including preventive, screening, diagnostic and therapeutic services; and aggressiveness of treatment. If these factors were modified, more than half of cancer deaths could be prevented and most racial and ethnic disparities in cancer death rates could be eliminated.

 

Immunization Registry Use and Progress-United States, 2001

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Terry Boyd
404-639-8584
CDC, National Immunization Program
 

Immunization registries are confidential information systems that collect vaccination data about all children within a geographic area. These registries enable public and private health care providers to consolidate and maintain computerized immunization records on all patients and allow multiple providers to access their patients’ immunization records. They help doctors remind parents when their children are due for immunizations, and remind parents and doctors of children who are overdue. The registries also help health care professionals stay abreast of the complex immunization schedule. Immunizations registries benefit communities in preventing disease outbreaks and controlling preventable diseases by identifying pockets of under-immunized children. Immunization registries benefit schools by reducing the time that school nurses and administrative staff require to check the immunization status of all students, annually, at every school, in grades K-12. Immunization registries benefit health care professionals by consolidating a child's immunizations from all doctors into one record, providing an accurate and reliable immunization history for any child, whether a new or continuing patient. And for children and parents, immunization registries prevent children from receiving unnecessary or duplicative immunizations.

 

Emergency Medical System Responses to Suicide-Related Calls -- Maine, November 1999-October 2000

 
PRESS CONTACT:
CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
770-488-4298
 

Suicide is devastating for individuals, families, schools and communities. This study conducted in Maine reveals that response by the emergency medical system (EMS) to suicide calls may be useful in early prevention efforts by providing an understanding for the risk factors associated with suicidal behavior. Rates of Maine EMS response to suicide-related calls were highest among females aged 15 to 19 years (384.8 per 100,000) and males aged 20 to 24 years (258.1 per 100,000). EMS suicide-related calls commonly involved: drugs/substance abuse at the time of incident (31.7%), patient-reported psychiatric illness (28.8%), domestic discord or violence (16.8%), or medical illness/pain (7.1%). This study also provides evidence for the importance of establishing statewide and national suicidal behavior surveillance systems.

 


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