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MMWR
Synopsis for January 11, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until 4 PM EST.

  1. Rapid Assessment of Physical Injuries Among World Trade Center Attack Survivors- New York City, September 2001
  2. Nutritional Assessment of Children After Severe Winter Weather-Mongolia, June 2001
  3. A Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella serotype Kottbus Infections Associated with Eating Alfalfa Sprouts-Arizona, California, Colorado, and New Mexico, February-April 2001

Synopsis for January 11, 2002

Rapid Assessment of Physical Injuries Among World Trade Center Attack Survivors - New York City, September 2001

The terrorist attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001 killed and injured more people than any previous attack on a civilian target in United States history.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

(770) 488-4298

 

In a rapid assessment that examined medical records for all emergency patients at five Manhattan hospitals, New York City Department of Health and CDC investigators found injured survivors began arriving within minutes of the WTC attack and emergency department visits peaked 2 to 3 hours later. Among the injured survivors, most were treated for inhalation or eye injuries and 18% required hospitalization for further treatment.

 

Nutritional Assessment of Children After Severe Winter Weather - Mongolia, June 2001

Researchers Find Nearly One-Third of Mongolian Children Suffer from Malnutrition.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Janet Bates, MD, MPH

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 488-6025
 

From 1999 to 2001, Mongolia experienced two exceptionally harsh winters, which caused extensive loss and debilitation of livestock. Because livestock are essential to diet and household economy of Mongolian herders, officials feared widespread malnutrition among young children could result from the severe weather conditions. In June 2001 a joint team of researchers from CDC and the Mongolian Ministry of Health examined children under 5 years old throughout Mongolia and found no evidence of acute malnutrition wasting or loss of body weight among children in areas hardest hit in 2000 and 2001. However, researchers found in both affected and unaffected areas that the growth of one-third of Mongolian children was stunted indicating chronic malnutrition, and that one-half of the youngest children under age 2 years were anemic. Although the recent harsh weather was not found to have had an immediate, measurable nutritional impact on children, the impact is being felt in many other ways not measured by the researchers, including severe psychological stress, increased school drop-out rates and social disruption due to thousands of impoverished herders migrating into urban centers. These findings highlight the need for both short and long-term interventions aimed at improving the nutritional status of children throughout Mongolia.

 

A Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella serotype Kottbus Infections Associated with Eating Alfalfa Sprouts-Arizona, California, Colorado, and New Mexico, February-April 2001

Once Perceived As "Healthy", Raw Sprouts Can Cause Serious Gastrointestinal Illness.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Mark Beatty, MD
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639-2438

Kevin L. Winthrop MD
California Department of Health Services
(510) 540-2566
 

In the last decade, sprouts have caused foodborne illnesses, because seeds used to grow sprouts may be contaminated with harmful bacteria, including Salmonella or E.coli. While sprout producers decontaminate seeds before germination, currently there is no seed-disinfection method that completely eliminates harmful bacteria. Because of this, eating raw sprouts may cause severe gastrointestinal illness. Children, the elderly, immunocompromised persons, and others who are at high risk for serious complications from such infections should avoid eating sprouts. For people who continue to eat sprouts, the Food and Drug Administration(FDA) recommends cooking them before eating. Sprout producers should adhere to FDA-guidelines for seed disinfection.

 


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