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MMWR
Synopsis for November 16, 2001

The MMWR is NOT embargoed this week.

  1. Coccidioidomycosis in Workers at an Archeological Site — Dinosaur National Monument, Utah, June – July 2001
  2. Update: Investigation of Bioterrorism-Related Anthrax in the United States and Other Countries
  3. n-Hexane-Related Peripheral Neuropathy Among Automotive Technicians — California, 1999
  4. Weekly Update: West Nile Virus Activity — United States, November 7–13, 2001


Notices to Readers

Update: Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis and Treatment of Children and Pregnant Women with Bacillus anthracis Infection
This notice provides additional information about prophylaxis and treatment for children, and information for treatment of lactating mothers.

Contact: Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639–3286


Synopsis for November 16, 2001

Coccidioidomycosis in Workers at an Archeological Site — Dinosaur National Monument, Utah, June – July 2001

Coccidioidomycosis is less common in Utah and has never before been detected so far north in the state.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Maryam Haddad, M.S.N., M.P.H.

CDC, Epidemiology Program Office
(801) 538–6676
 

A recent outbreak of coccidioidomycosis, commonly called “Valley Fever,” suggests the fungus that causes this infection is present in soil further north in Utah than previously thought. Coccidioidomycosis is usually a mild lung infection that resolves itself without treatment in people with healthy immune systems. More severe cases can be successfully treated with common antifungal medication. The fungus that causes the infection, Coccidioides immitis, is known to be present in the soil of the southwestern United States, California, and parts of Central and South America. The Utah outbreak indicates that healthcare providers may need to consider coccidioidomycosis if they see patients with similar illness, who reside in or have recently traveled to this area.

 

Update: Investigation of Bioterrorism-Related Anthrax in the United States and Other Countries

Since the previous report, all patients with bioterrorism-related anthrax who were hospitalized have been discharged and continue to recover..

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations.

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639–3286
 

No new cases have been reported. The source of these bioterrorist attacks has not been identified, and additional cases might occur. Public health authorities, health-care providers, and laboratorians should remain vigilant for cases of anthrax. CDC has assisted authorities in other countries investigating cases of bioterrorism-related anthrax. During October 12–November 13, CDC received 111 requests from 66 countries. Of these, 47 (42%) requests were laboratory related; 43 (39%) were general requests for bioterrorism information; 13 (12%) were for environmental or occupational health guidelines; and eight (7%) were about developing bioterrorism preparedness plans. No cases of bioterrorism-related anthrax have been confirmed in U.S. Embassy employees or in persons from other countries.

 

n-Hexane-Related Peripheral Neuropathy Among Automotive Technicians — California, 1999

Health officials in California have reported three cases of peripheral neuropathy among automotive repair technicians exposed to cleaning solvents containing n-hexane.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Jim Cone, M.D., M.P.H.

California Department of Health Services
(510) 622–4319
 

n-Hexane-induced peripheral neuropathy has been reported in other industries; however, these are the first cases to be reported in the automotive repair industry. Each individual experienced a gradual loss of sensation and motor control in the hands and feet that eventually spread to the arms and legs and in all cases precluded continued employment. One individual has recovered motor control and returned to work after a 2-year period of rehabilitation; the two additional patients are disabled and unemployed. As a result of these findings, the California Department of Health Services issued a Health Hazard Advisory in August, 2001 on n-hexane use in vehicle repair.

 

Weekly Update: West Nile Virus Activity — United States, November 7–13, 2001

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639–3286
 

The report summarizes surveillance data for West Nile Virus (WNV) activities in the United States. The report includes information on human cases and deaths, infected birds and other animals, and WNV-positive mosquito pools.




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This page last reviewed Thursday, November 15, 2001
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