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Div. of Media Relations
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MMWR
Synopsis for October 26, 2001

The MMWR is not embargoed this week.

  1. Update: Investigation of Anthrax Associated With Intentional Exposure and Interim Public Health Guidelines October 2001
  2. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin or Soft Tissue Infections in a State Prison Mississippi, 2000
  3. Shigella sonnei Outbreak Among Men Who Have Sex With Men San Francisco, California, 20002001
  4. Weekly Update: West Nile Virus Activity United States, October 1723, 2001


MMWR Reports & Recommendations
October 26, 2001/Vol.50/No. 18

Increasing Physical Activity: A Report on Recommendations from the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

The Task Force recommendations include: two informational approaches (i.e., community-wide campaigns and point-of-decision prompts to encourage use of stairs); three behavioral and social approaches (i.e., school-based physical education, social support interventions in community settings and individually adapted health behavior change programs); and one intervention to increase physical activity by using environmental and policy approaches.

Contact: Brad Meyers
CDC, Epidemiology Program Office
(770) 448 8189


Synopsis for October 26, 2001

Update: Investigation of Anthrax Associated With Intentional Exposure and Interim Public Health Guidelines October 2001

 

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 6393286
 

Summary not available.






 

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin or Soft Tissue Infections in a State Prison Mississippi, 2000

Disease caused by drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus may be an emerging problem in prison settings.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Matthew Kuehnert, M.D.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6396426
 

Staph has become increasingly resistant to antibiotics most often used for treatment (i.e., drug-resistant staph or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA]). Previously, most infections caused by drug-resistant staph have been limited to healthcare facilities. This outbreak shows that, in addition to healthcare settings such as hospitals and long-term care facilities, drug-resistant staph infections also may become a problem in correctional facilities. Contact with lesions of infected inmates or contaminated items may have increased spread of disease in this outbreak. Preventive strategies in correctional facilities are urged, including good hygiene practices for all inmates, rapid diagnosis of skin disease, and effective treatment of skin infections caused by drug-resistant staph, including antibiotics and wound care.

 

Shigella sonnei Outbreak Among Men Who Have Sex With Men San Francisco, California, 20002001

Sexual transmission of shigellosis is preventable.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Eileen Shields, M.A.

San Francisco Department of Public Health
(415) 5542507
 

Shigella infections increased dramatically among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Summer of 2000 in San Francisco. It is a bacteria that causes bloody diarrhea, is very infectious, and easily spread by small amounts of fecal contamination. Usually these infections occur in young children and women and are associated with poor hygienic conditions in childcare settings. This outbreak was caused by sex involving the anus. Some sexual routes for transmission are oral-anal contact (rimming), and inadvertent exposure of the mouth through stool on fingers, penises, condoms, and sex toys. The infection is treatable by antibiotics, which minimizes the risk of transmission to others.


Weekly Update: West Nile Virus Activity United States, October 1723, 2001

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 6393286
 

The report summarizes surveillance data for West Nile Virus (WNV) activities in the United States. The report includes information on human cases and deaths, infected birds and other animals, and WNV-positive mosquito pools.




 

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