Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us
US Department of Health and Human Services logo and link

Media Relations Links
About Us
Media Contact
Frequently Asked Questions
Media Site Map

CDC News
Press Release Library
Transcripts
MMWR Summaries
B-Roll Footage
Upcoming Events

Related Links
Centers at CDC
Data and Statistics
Health Topics A-Z
Image Library
Publications, Software and Other Products
Global Health Odyssey
Find your state or local health department
HHS News
National Health Observances
Visit the FirstGov Web Site
Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394


MMWR
Synopsis for August 24, 2001

The MMWR is embargoed until 4 p.m. ET, Thursdays.

  1. Outbreaks of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Associated With Veterinary Facilities Idaho, Minnesota, and Washington, 1999
  2. Tularemia Oklahoma, 2000
  3. Outbreak of Pneumococcal Pneumonia Among Unvaccinated Residents in a Nursing Home New Jersey, April 2001
  4. Adverse Events and Deaths Associated With Laboratory Errors at a Hospital Pennsylvania, 2001

Synopsis for August 24, 2001

Outbreaks of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Associated With Veterinary Facilities Idaho, Minnesota, and Washington, 1999

Cats and other animals can shed Salmonella in their feces. Pet owners and veterinary employees should wash their hands after animal contact and before eating.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Jennifer Gordon Wright, D.V.M.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 3715407
 

Although most cases of Salmonella infections that occur each year in the United States are transmitted through food, the disease can also be transmitted through exposure to contaminated water, reptiles, farm animals, and pets. In late 1999, three outbreaks of human multidrug-resistant Salmonella infections occurred associated with veterinary facilities in the United States. These outbreaks demonstrate that cats may shed Salmonella in their feces and that veterinary facilities may serve as a setting for transmission of Salmonella to other animals and humans. Veterinary workers should wash their hands after handling pets, especially animal feces. Although outbreaks of these kinds have been previously reported in large animal facilities (e.g., horse clinics), outbreaks associated with small animal facilities are rare.

 

Tularemia Oklahoma, 2000

Tularemia is an uncommon, but serious febrile illness.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Mamadou Diallo, M.D., M.P.H.

CDC, Epidemiology Program Office
(404) 6394017
 

Tularemia can be prevented by avoiding tick and fly bites and handling of sick or dead animals, especially rabbits. Additionally, special precautions should be taken when working with the tularemia agent in the laboratory. The disease is treatable with commonly used antibiotics. Early diagnosis and treatment is needed to avoid severe and sometimes fatal complications of infection. Tularemia is characterized by fever and a wide range of other signs of inflammation; in its most common form it presents as an open sore of the skin and swollen and painful lymph glands. Healthcare providers who see patients with fever of unknown cause should consider the possibility of tularemia, and ask about possible infective exposures, such as handling of animal carcasses or recent tick or fly bites.

 

Outbreak of Pneumococcal Pneumonia Among Unvaccinated Residents in a Nursing Home New Jersey, April 2001

Providing pneumococcal vaccines to long-term care facility residents is important in the prevention of pneumococcal illness.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Laura Otterbourg

New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services
(609) 9847160
(Alternate: Chris Van Beneden, CDC, 404-639-2215)
 

Outbreaks of pneumococcal pneumonia and bacteremia, resulting in deaths, occur in long-term care facilities with low vaccine coverage. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines are considered safe and have been shown to be effective in preventing invasive disease and death among persons 65 years and older. Regulations that mandate hospitals, adult day health care facilities, and long-term care facilities (LTCF), including nursing homes and assisted living facilities, to offer and document pneumococcal vaccinations may improve vaccination coverage for LTCF residents. Better documentation would facilitate the tracking of vaccination status of residents and provide medical history information to other health-care facilities when a resident is hospitalized or transferred, or if an outbreak of pneumococcal illness occurred.

 

Adverse Events and Deaths Associated With Laboratory Errors at a Hospital Pennsylvania, 2001

Adverse Events and Deaths Associated With Laboratory Errors at a Hospital Pennsylvania, 2001

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 4981251
 

Over a 7-week period from June through July of this year, a hospital laboratory in Pennsylvania reported 2,146 incorrect results for a blood test used in patients taking the anti-coagulant drug warfarin. Warfarin inhibits blood clotting and is prescribed for the management and prevention of conditions such as stroke, clots in the legs, and heart attacks. Some physicians who received these reports increased their patients' doses of warfarin, potentially leading to bleeding complications. Two deaths have been associated with the laboratory error. Efforts are underway by the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and CDC to identify other patient morbidity and mortality associated with the error, its possible causes, and the steps needed to prevent it from happening again.

 


 

Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed Friday, August 24, 2001
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Office of Communication