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MMWR
Synopsis for August 3, 2001

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m., EST, Thursdays.

  1. National, State, and Urban Area Vaccination Coverage Levels Among Children Aged 19–35 Months — United States, 2000
  2. Norwalk-Like Virus Outbreaks at Two Summer Camps — Wisconsin, June 2001
  3. Fever, Jaundice, and Multiple Organ System Failure Associated with 17D-Derived Yellow Fever Vaccination, 1996–2001

Synopsis for August 3, 2001

National, State, and Urban Area Vaccination Coverage Levels Among Children Aged 19–35 Months — United States, 2000

This article ONLY is not embargoed.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Lawrence Barker, Ph.D.

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 639–8560
 

High immunization coverage can not be taken for granted; continual efforts are required to maintain current levels. National coverage for routinely recommended childhood vaccines remain high. However, slight declines in coverage with certain vaccines occurred between 1999 and 2000. Variation in coverage among geographic areas suggests that, should an epidemic occur, the accumulation of susceptible persons in low coverage areas could serve as a reservoir to disseminate disease.

 

Norwalk-Like Virus Outbreaks at Two Summer Camps — Wisconsin, June 2001

Hand washing is an important factor in decreasing the transmission of Norwalk-like virus infections.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Donita Croft, M.D., M.S.

Wisconsin Division of Public Health
(608) 267–9004
 

Outbreaks of Norwalk-like virus infections occurred at two recreational camps in Wisconsin in June 2001. The infections were spread at the camps by person-to-person transmission and the rustic setting of the camps contributed to the transmission. The availability and use of hand washing facilities and the cleaning of environmental surfaces are important factors in decreasing the transmission of Norwalk-like virus in the camp setting. Norwalk-like virus can be transmitted by person-to-person contact, by direct contact, contact with contaminated surfaces, or via aerosols. During June 30–July 1, the washable surfaces at the camps were cleaned and soap dispensers were added at the handwashing facilities. No further cases of gastrointestinal illness were reported at the camps after June 30.

 

Fever, Jaundice, and Multiple Organ System Failure Associated with 17D-Derived Yellow Fever Vaccination, 1996–2001

Yellow fever vaccine should still be administered to persons traveling to areas in Africa and South America where yellow fever occurs.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Kathleen Julian, M.D.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(970) 266–3519
(Ft. Collins, CO)
 

Approximately 300 million persons worldwide have received the yellow fever vaccine. For the first time, between 1996-2001, seven cases of severe illness following yellow fever vaccination have been reported. Although not proven in all cases, yellow fever vaccine may have been the cause of illness. An investigation has been initiated to improve documentation of clinical evidence for this rare but severe illness following yellow fever vaccination. Health-care providers are encouraged to report suspect cases to CDC/FDA Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS). The World Health Organization estimates that 200,000 cases of yellow fever occur each year in Africa and South America. The risk of acquiring yellow fever during travel to these areas is likely to be increasing. Persons without contraindications, who are traveling to areas where yellow fever occurs, should still be vaccinated.

 


 

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