Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us
US Department of Health and Human Services logo and link

Media Relations Links
About Us
Media Contact
Frequently Asked Questions
Media Site Map

CDC News
Press Release Library
Transcripts
MMWR Summaries
B-Roll Footage
Upcoming Events

Related Links
Centers at CDC
Data and Statistics
Health Topics A-Z
Image Library
Publications, Software and Other Products
Global Health Odyssey
Find your state or local health department
HHS News
National Health Observances
Visit the FirstGov Web Site
Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394


MMWR
Synopsis for June 8, 2001

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Fatal Pediatric Lead Poisoning New Hampshire, 2000
  2. Evaluation of Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Practices for Male Patients With Urethritis at a Large Group Practice Affiliated With a Managed Care Organization Massachusetts, 19951997
  3. Racial Disparities in Median Age at Death of Persons with Down Syndrome United States, 19681997
  4. Update: Influenza Activity United States and Worldwide, 200001 Season, and Composition of the 200102 Influenza Vaccine

Synopsis for June 8, 2001

Fatal Pediatric Lead Poisoning New Hampshire, 2000

Lead poisoning, though only occasionally fatal, remains a serious but preventable public health problem.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Thomas Matte, M.D., M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(212) 8227280
 


In April, 1990 a 2-year-old girl living in Manchester, New Hampshire died from lead poisoning, the first reported death of a child from lead poisoning in the U.S. since 1990. An investigation by the local and state health departments along with CDC concluded that the girl, whose Sudanese refugee family had arrived in this country just 6 weeks prior to her death, was most likely poisoned by ingesting leaded paint and dust at her Manchester apartment. The most common remaining sources of lead poisoning in this country deteriorated leaded paint in older housing and elevated levels of lead-contaminated house dust are found in an estimated 24 million U.S. dwellings; 4.4 million of which are home to one or more children aged <6 years.

 

Evaluation of Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Practices for Male Patients With Urethritis at a Large Group Practice Affiliated With a Managed Care Organization Massachusetts, 19951997

Managed care provider helps prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Massachusetts.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 6398895
 


Tracking STDs syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia helps prevent their spread by identifying outbreaks, detecting drug resistance, and facilitating sex partner notification. In this study, a team of researchers evaluated the care given to 196 symptomatic men diagnosed with urethritis from 1995 to 1997 at a managed care organization-affiliated group practice in eastern Massachusetts. Most of the men (92%) were tested for chlamydia, 83% were tested for gonorrhea, and 82% were tested for both infections. Antibiotic therapy, recommended by CDC, was prescribed to every patient within 5 days of seeking treatment. In addition, the researchers reviewed 393 male cases with positive chlamydia or gonorrhea tests and found that 78% of the chlamydia cases and 82% of the gonorrhea cases were reported to the state health department.

 

Racial Disparities in Median Age at Death of Persons with Down Syndrome United States, 19681997

People with Down syndrome are now living much longer than they did in the past, but this improvement varies by racial group.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
J. M. Friedman, M.D., Ph.D.

University of British Columbia
(604) 8220367 (Alternate: Sonja Rasmussen, CDC, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 7704887152)
 


Down syndrome is the most common identified cause of mental retardation. People with Down syndrome in the United States live much longer now than 30 years ago, but this improvement is much greater for whites than for blacks or other races. The causes for this racial disparity are unknown. Death at an early age is more common among people with Down syndrome who are black or of other races than among those who are white. In 1997, on average, whites with Down syndrome lived 50 years, blacks lived 25 years, and other racial groups lived 11 years. Further study is needed to determine why the age at death for people with Down syndrome varies so greatly among racial groups.

 

Update: Influenza Activity United States and Worldwide, 2000 01 Season, and Composition of the 2001 02 Influenza Vaccine

The 2000-01 influenza season in the United States was mild and predominated by influenza A and B viruses.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 6393286
 


The 200001 influenza season, which peaked during mid-January through early February, was mild in the United States. This was the first season since 199596 that was not predominated by A(H3N2) viruses. Influenza A(H1N1) viruses predominated overall in the United States, but, in some regions, influenza B viruses were reported more frequently than influenza type A viruses. Worldwide, influenza A(H1N1) and B viruses also predominated. The Food and Drug Administration's Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee recommended that the 200102 trivalent influenza vaccine for the United States contain A/New Caledonia/20/99-like (H1N1), A/Moscow/10/99-like (H3N2), and B/Sichuan/379/99-like viruses.

 


 

Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed Friday, June 8, 2001
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Office of Communication