Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us
US Department of Health and Human Services logo and link

Media Relations Links
About Us
Media Contact
Frequently Asked Questions
Media Site Map

CDC News
Press Release Library
Transcripts
MMWR Summaries
B-Roll Footage
Upcoming Events

Related Links
Centers at CDC
Data and Statistics
Health Topics A-Z
Image Library
Publications, Software and Other Products
Global Health Odyssey
Find your state or local health department
HHS News
National Health Observances
Visit the FirstGov Web Site
Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394


MMWR
Synopsis for March 16, 2001

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Lyme Disease - United States, 1999
  2. Knowledge and Use of Folic Acid Among Women of Reproductive Age - Michigan, 1998

 


Lyme Disease United States, 1999

CDC is intensifying efforts for the prevention of Lyme disease in the United States.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Stacie Marshall, M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(970) 2216400 (Colorado)
 


Lyme disease, a tick-borne bacterial illness, continues to be an important emerging infectious disease in the United States. In 1999, 16,273 cases of Lyme disease were reported by states to CDC, compared to an average of 12,745 cases reported annually since 1991, when Lyme disease became nationally notifiable. As expected, most cases of Lyme disease were reported from states in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and North Central regions, and more than 90% of cases were reported from only 109 counties in 9 states (NY, CT, PA, NJ, MD, MA, RI, WI, and MN). Most cases of Lyme disease arise from tick exposures in late spring and early summer, and children are at highest risk of infection. Lyme disease can be prevented by avoiding tick infested areas, use of insect repellents, prompt removal of attached ticks, and appropriate vaccination. Complications can be reduced by early diagnosis and treatment.

 

Knowledge and Use of Folic Acid Among Women of Reproductive Age Michigan, 1998

All women of reproductive age should regularly take a folic acid supplement.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Cassius Lockett, Ph.D., M.S.

CDC, Epidemiology Program Office
(517) 3359027 (Michigan)
 


Women of reproductive age need to take at least 400 micrograms of the B-vitamin folic acid daily. This amount will reduce the risk of having a baby with certain birth defects such as spina bifida or other related neural tube defects (NTDs). A state health department survey of 739 women of reproductive age (18-44 years), in Michigan, found that most of these women did not take a folic acid supplement or multivitamin on a regular basis, and were unaware of why folic acid consumption is important to them. The Michigan Study found that 42.4% of these women took a multivitamin or folic acid supplement daily. Women who did not take a multivitamin on a regular basis were more likely to be young, obese, consumed inadequate amounts of fruit and vegetables, and were at a lower education level. The survey found that only 30% of the women were aware that taking folic acid can prevent NTDs.
 


 

Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed Friday, March 16, 2001
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Office of Communication