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MMWR
Synopsis for December 22, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Multistate Outbreak of Listeriosis — United States, 2000
  2. Foodborne Outbreak of Group A Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Among College Students — District of Columbia, March–April 2000
  3. Blood Lead Levels in Young Children — United States and Selected States, 1996–1999

Recommendations and Reports

December 22, 2000/Vol.49/RR-16
This is a reprint of the August 6, 2000, executive summary report.

Contact: Office on Smoking and Health
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 488–5747


Special Notice to Media

The MMWR will not be published on Friday, December 29, 2000.


Synopsis for December 22, 2000

Multistate Outbreak of Listeriosis — United States, 2000

An outbreak of Listeriosis has been identified in 10 states.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Sonja Olsen, Ph.D.
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639–2206
 

Thus far, 29 cases of listeriosis have been identified in New York (15 cases), Georgia (3), Connecticut (2), Ohio (2), Michigan (2), California (1), Pennsylvania (1), Tennessee (1), Utah (1), and Wisconsin (1). Listeriosis causes an estimated 2,500 serious illnesses and 500 deaths in the United States each year. The 29 cases reported in this article have been associated with 4 deaths and 3 miscarriages/stillbirths. Deli turkey meat is the probable source of infection. Persons at increased risk for serious complications due to Listeriosis infection include pregnant women; persons 65 years of age and older; newborns; and persons with cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, or AIDS. For more information on listeriosis visit this CDC website http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/listeriosis_g.htm.

 

Foodborne Outbreak of Group A Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Among College Students — District of Columbia, March–April 2000

Group A rotavirus, which is the most common cause of diarrhea in children, can also cause outbreaks of gastroenteritis in healthy adults.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Dixie Griffin
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639–3628
 

In March 2000, 85 students at a university in Washington, D.C., were affected by an epidemic of gastroenteritis. The illness was associated with eating deli sandwiches at a dining hall on campus. The cause of the outbreak was identified as Group A rotavirus. Group A rotavirus infects nearly all children worldwide by 5 years of age, and its mode of transmission in this age group is not completely understood. This outbreak is unusual because it affected young, healthy adults, (all of whom should have been immune to rotavirus) and because food was indirectly implicated as the source of infection. Investigators of gastroenteritis outbreaks in adults should consider rotavirus as a possible cause for infection. For more information on Group A rotavirus visit this CDC website http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/nrevss/rotfeat.htm.

 

Blood Lead Levels in Young Children — United States and Selected States, 1996–1999

Childhood lead poisoning in young children still remains a problem in some local areas.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Sharunda Buchanan, M.S., Ph.D.
CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(404) 639–1781
 

Efforts to prevent lead exposure in young children (6 years of age and young) continue to produce reductions in blood lead levels. Recent findings indicate that despite the decline in the mean blood lead level among U.S. children (as noted by the National Health and Nutrition Examination data), the problem remains concentrated on a local level. The primary sources of childhood lead exposure are deteriorated leaded paint and the soil and dust it contaminates in old housing. Young (6 years of age and younger), low-income (particularly Medicaid) children living in older housing are at increased risk for exposure. There is an ongoing need to target and monitor state and local prevention efforts in populations at increased risk for lead exposure. State and local health agencies are encouraged to target screening efforts by using blood lead surveillance data, census data, Medicaid data, and other sources of information on risk factors such as housing age and poverty.


 

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