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MMWR
Synopsis for November 24, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis Outbreak in a State Correctional Facility Housing HIV-Infected Inmates South Carolina, 19992000
  2. Update: West Nile Virus Activity Eastern United States, 2000
  3. Measles, Rubella, and Congenital Rubella Syndrome United States and Mexico, 19971999

MMWR
Synopsis for November 24, 2000

Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis Outbreak in a State Correctional Facility Housing HIV-Infected Inmates South Carolina, 19992000

Separate and isolated housing for HIV-infected inmates contributed to the spread of tuberculosis in a South Carolina prison.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 6398895
 

Thirty-one cases of tuberculosis (TB) were confirmed among HIV-infected male inmates and parolees who were segregated within South Carolina's only prison for men with HIV. The outbreak originated with an inmate who had infectious TB that was undiagnosed for at least two months. A medical student, who examined him, also developed infectious active TB. Because HIV weakens the immune system, people co-infected with HIV and TB have up to 800 times greater risk of developing active TB than the general public. This outbreak demonstrates that the rapid spread of TB among incarcerated individuals and their healthcare providers can be a consequence of segregated housing for HIV-infected inmates. Systems must be in place to stop TB outbreaks in prisons and other such settings like hospital wards and homeless shelters.

 

Update: West Nile Virus Activity Eastern United States, 2000

The geographic range of West Nile virus activity in the United States continues to expand.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Steven Hinten, D.V.M., M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(970) 2216400

(Note: On Friday, November 24, 2000 Dr. Hinten can be reached at 9702159756. Alternate: Dr. Tony Marfin at 9702158327)

 

Data reported to CDC through the West Nile (WN) Virus Surveillance System have shown an increase in the geographic range of WN virus activity in 2000 compared with 1999. In response to the occurrence of WN virus in the United States, 17 states along the Atlantic and gulf coasts, New York City and Washington, D.C. have conducted WN virus surveillance, which includes monitoring of mosquitoes, sentinel chicken flocks, wild birds and potentially susceptible mammals (e.g., horses and humans). In 2000, epizootic activity in birds and/or mosquitoes was reported from 12 states (Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia) and the District of Columbia. This year, 18 persons were hospitalized with illnesses caused by WNV; 1 patient died and 1 patient is in a persistent vegetative state.

 

Measles, Rubella, and Congenital Rubella Syndrome United States and Mexico, 19971999

The United States and Mexico hope to successfully eliminate measles transmission through continued binational efforts in rubella control.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Sharon Bloom, M.D.

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398768
 

In 1996, the Mexico - U.S. Binational Commission Immunization Working Group was initiated to coordinate the monitoring, control, and elimination of vaccine-preventable diseases between these two countries. Since the measles epidemic during 1989-1991, substantial progress has been achieved in vaccination programs in the United States and Mexico, as evidenced by the elimination of endemic transmission of measles in both countries. The United States is now on the verge of eliminating indigenous rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Mexico began universal rubella vaccination in 1998, and recent measles-rubella vaccination campaigns among healthcare workers, teachers, and junior and senior high-school students will both accelerate the decline in rubella and CRS cases and prevent the reentry of measles.


 

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