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MMWR
Synopsis for November 17, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Public Health Consequences Among First Responders to Emergency Events Associated With Illicit Methamphetamine Laboratories — Selected States, 1996–1999
  2. Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication — Eastern Mediterranean Region, 1999–September 2000

Recommendations & Reports
Vol. 49 (RR-13) November 17, 2000

Use of Diphtheria Toxoid-Tetanus Toxoid-Acellular Pertussis Vaccine as a Five-Dose Series: Supplemental Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

Four vaccines containing diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) are currently licensed in the United States for use among infants and young children. As of October 2000, two products were licensed for the five-dose DTaP vaccination series. Two other vaccines ) are licensed for the first four doses of the vaccination series, beginning with the primary series at ages 2, 4, and 6 months, and for completing the DTaP series among children who began the series with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and whole-cell pertussis vaccine. This report supplements the statement from CDC's ACIP regarding use of acellular pertussis vaccines and summarizes data regarding reactogenicity of acellular pertussis vaccines when administered as the fourth and fifth consecutive doses. Increases in the frequency and magnitude of local reactions at the injection site with increasing dose number have occurred for all currently licensed DTaP vaccines. Because data are insufficient regarding the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of using DTaP vaccines from different manufacturers in a mixed sequence, ACIP continues to recommend that, whenever feasible, the same brand of DTaP vaccine be used for all doses in the vaccination series. When the vaccine provider does not know or does not have available the type of DTaP vaccine previously administered, any of the licensed DTaP vaccines can be used to complete the vaccine series.

Contact: Lynn Zanardi, M.D.
CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 639–8253


MMWR
Synopsis for November 17, 2000

Public Health Consequences Among First Responders to Emergency Events Associated With Illicit Methamphetamine Laboratories — Selected States, 1996–1999

Hazardous substances released from active or abandoned methamphetamine laboratories have the potential to cause serious injury and death, specifically among first responders.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
D. Kevin Horton, M.S.P.H.

Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry, CDC
(404) 639–6203
 

Hazardous substances released from active or abandoned methamphetamine laboratories have the potential to cause serious injury and death. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, CDC maintains the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance system to collect and analyze information about the morbidity and mortality associated with hazardous substance events in 16 participating states. An event is defined as an uncontrolled or illegal release or threatened release of a hazardous substance(s). Findings from 1996-1999 data indicate that, of the methamphetamine laboratory events, the highest number of injured persons were first responders (i.e., police officers, firefighters). This report describes those injuries to first responders, summarizes events that involved injured first responders, and suggests injury prevention methods to protect first responders.

 

Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication — Eastern Mediterranean Region, 1999–September 2000

It appears by the end of 2000, poliovirus transmission will be eliminated in 19 of the 23 EMR countries.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Victor M. Caceres, M.D., M.P.H.

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 639–8252
 

In 1988 the Regional Committee for the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) of the World Health Organization (WHO) resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis from the region 2000. Since then, there has been remarkable progress surveillance and implementation of coordinated National Immunization Days (NIDs). During 1999-2000, the quality of NIDs improved substantially through house to house vaccination. Also during this period, all but 4 countries achieved surveillance quality indicators indicative of sensitive surveillance, while the number of confirmed polio cases has decreased by approximately 50%. Remaining challenges include reaching children in countries with armed conflict, intensifying program activities in remaining endemic countries, and reaching and maintaining high routine OPV coverage high to prevent spreading of imported polioviruses.


 

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