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MMWR
Synopsis for August 18, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease California, Illinois, and New York, 1998
  2. Progress Toward Global Dracunculiasis Eradication, June 2000
  3. Varicella Outbreaks Among Mexican Adults Alabama, 2000
 

MMWR
Synopsis for August 18, 2000

Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease California, Illinois, and New York, 1998

Medical care, parent education, and preventive measures early infancy are important in reducing complications from sickle cell disease.

 
PRESS CONTACT: 
Richard Olney, M.D., M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(770) 4887160

 
Currently most U.S. newborns are screened for sickle cell disease. Early diagnosis allows young infants to begin preventive antibiotic treatment and benefit from comprehensive medical care and parent education programs. In California, Illinois, and New York, the state health departments have been following young children with sickle cell disease to determine rates of complications and use of preventive measures. This report focuses on rates of preventive interventions among young children. Data from this study show the need for ongoing public health follow-up to ensure that all children receive needed treatment and services. The results also indicate that there are gaps in the use of penicillin and receipt of immunizations among young children with sickle cell disease.

 

Progress Toward Global Dracunculiasis Eradication, June 2000

Guinea worm disease has been eradicated from 7 of 20 countries and its incidence reduced by 97%.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben, Ph.D., M.S.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(770) 4884509
 

In 1986, an estimated 3 million persons were infected with dracunculiasis (Guinea worm disease). The global campaign to eradicate Guinea worm disease has eliminated the disease from 7 of 20 affected countries, and reduced the annual incidence to less than 100,000 cases in 1999 (a reduction of 97%). Transmission of the disease no longer occurs in Asia, but remains endemic in 13 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Sudan remains the most affected country, having reported 66,097 (69%) of the global cases in 1999. Although progress towards the elimination of the disease in Africa has accelerated during 2000, the continuing war in Sudan is the biggest impediment to the success of the campaign.

 

Varicella Outbreaks Among Mexican Adults Alabama, 2000

Varicella (chickenpox) outbreaks among adults may be associated with severe complications.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
M. Carolina Holliday, M.D.

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398254
 

In May and June 2000, Alabama health officials and CDC identified two outbreaks of chickenpox among previously healthy adults. During the first outbreak, 18 cases were identified. All case-patients had been born in Mexico and now lived in the same apartment complex and worked at the same poultry processing plant. Two of these patients developed severe complications and were hospitalized. Control measures were initiated at the apartment complex and the poultry processing plant. On June 24, a second cluster of 7 cases of chickenpox were identified among adults born in Mexico and now working at a sawmill. Outbreaks of chickenpox are less common among adults than children. However, previously unvaccinated adults and those with no exposure to the disease (negative varicella serological testing) are at-risk for infection and serious complications.

 


 

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