Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us
US Department of Health and Human Services logo and link

Media Relations Links
About Us
Media Contact
Frequently Asked Questions
Media Site Map

CDC News
Press Release Library
Transcripts
MMWR Summaries
B-Roll Footage
Upcoming Events

Related Links
Centers at CDC
Data and Statistics
Health Topics A-Z
Image Library
Publications, Software and Other Products
Global Health Odyssey
Find your state or local health department
HHS News
National Health Observances
Visit the FirstGov Web Site
Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394


MMWR
Synopsis for August 11, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Fatal Illnesses Associated With a New World Arenavirus California, 1999 2000
  2. State-Specific Prevalence of Disability among Adults 11 States and the District of Columbia, 1998
  3. Update: West Nile Activity Northeastern United States, January 1 August 7, 2000
 

MMWR
Synopsis for August 11, 2000

Fatal Illnesses Associated With a New World Arenavirus California, 1999 2000

Preventive measures for arenavirus infections include control of rodent populations and their exclusion from human dwellings.

 
PRESS CONTACT: 
Division of Media Relations

Office of Communication
(404) 6393286

 

The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) and University of Texas Medical Center recently identified evidence of infection with an arenavirus in three patients hospitalized with similar fatal illnesses. This report summarizes the investigation of this outbreak. Arenaviruses are rodent-borne enveloped RNA viruses and broken down into two groups, Old World and New World. Several arenaviruses cause viral hemorrhagic fever syndromes in Africa and South America. The South American hemorrhagic fever viruses belong to the Tacaribe complex or New World arena viruses (e.g., Junin, Machupo, Guanarito, and Sabia). The Old World arenaviruses include the agents of Lassa fever and lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM). LCM associated with the house mouse Mus musculus is the only Old World arenavirus that occurs in the Americans.

 

State-Specific Prevalence of Disability among Adults 11 States and the District of Columbia, 1998

Standard questions are needed to conduct surveillance of disability at the state and national level.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Vince Campbell, PhD

CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(770) 4887684
 

The work represents the first state-level prevalence analysis of disability from the BRFSS. Uniform data are needed to guide public health activities, including the implementation of state Healthy People 2010 objectives. CDC analyzed data from the disability module from BRFSS in eleven states and the District of Columbia to estimate state-level prevalence of disability. Positive response to either of two questions addressing activity limitations or use of assistive equipment to get around constituted the case definition. The average prevalence rate was 17.1%, consistent with national estimates ranging from 15% - 20%. State prevalence rates varied considerably, ranging from 13.6% to 21.8%. Rates increased with age: ages 18-44 ranged from 6.3% to 12.8%, averaging 9.7%; ages 45-64 ranged from 16.6% to 31.2%, averaging 22.1%; age 65 and older ranged from 26.2% to 40.4%, averaging 30.8%.

 

Update: West Nile Activity Northeastern United States, January 1 August 7, 2000

The data in this report suggest an expanding zone of epizootic transmission in four northeastern states with viral activity most intense in the NYC area.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

Office of Communication
(404) 6393286
 

Surveillance programs initiated in response to the 1999 West Nile virus (WNV) outbreak have detected increased transmission activity in the northeastern United States. Seventeen states along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast, New York City (NYC) and Washington, D.C., have conducted WNV surveillance and are reporting to CDC. Surveillance includes monitoring of mosquitos, sentinel chicken flocks, wild birds, and potentially susceptible mammals such as horses and humans for WNV infection. This report summarizes findings of this surveillance system through August 7, 2000.

 


 

Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed Friday, August 11, 2000
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Office of Communication