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MMWR
Synopsis for March 24, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Rubella Among Hispanic Adults Kansas, 1998 and Nebraska, 1999
  2. Adoption of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Prevention Recommendations by Prenatal Care Providers Connecticut and Minnesota, 1998

MMWR
Synopsis for March 24, 2000

Rubella Among Hispanic Adults Kansas, 1998 and Nebraska, 1999

The report describes two recent workplace-centered outbreaks of rubella; the majority of cases were among Hispanic adults.

 
PRESS CONTACT: 
Susan Reef, M.D. 

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398230
Since 1996, 12 outbreaks of rubella in the United States have been reported. Seven of the outbreaks were primarily focused on workplaces (primarily food-processing plants or other industries employing foreign-born workers); the majority of case-patients being of Hispanic origin. Although rubella is now near record low levels in the U.S., epidemics continue to occur among susceptible, predominantly foreign-born adults. Vaccinating against rubella in workplaces is a strategy to reach this susceptible population and can be a critical step in reaching the goal of elimination of indigenous rubella. We encourage public health professionals, other health care professionals and industrial health care services to design appropriate programs to assure high coverage of employees with rubella vaccine.

 

Adoption of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Prevention Recommendations by Prenatal Care Providers   Connecticut and Minnesota, 1998

The vast majority of prenatal care providers have adopted Group B Streptococcal (GBS) prevention strategies.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
James Watt, M.D., M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6392215
In order to maximize the benefit of preventive measures, it is important for pregnant women to understand which strategy their provider is following to prevent GBS. This report shows that the vast majority of prenatal care providers have adopted one of the two GBS disease prevention strategies recommended by the CDC, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The choice of strategy appears to vary by region and type of provider. Pregnant women should discuss GBS disease prevention with their prenatal care provider. Working together, prenatal care providers and women can reduce the risk of this serious infections of newborns. Further, ongoing education efforts for prenatal care providers and pregnant women will be important to ensure that the nationwide decrease in neonatal GBS disease continues.

 


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