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MMWR
Synopsis for February 18, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Role of Victims' Services in Improving Intimate Partner Violence Screening by Trained Maternal and Child Health-Care Providers Boston, Massachusetts, 19941995
  2. Information Needs and Uses of the Public Health Workforce Washington, 19971998

MMWR
Synopsis for February 18, 2000

Role of Victims' Services in Improving Intimate Partner Violence Screening by Trained Maternal and Child Health-Care Providers Boston, Massachusetts, 19941995

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious, preventable public health problem affecting the health of many women and children.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Linda McKibben, M.D., M.P.H.
CDC, Epidemiology Program Office
(770) 4888202
Nearly 1 million incidents of nonlethal intimate partner violence occurred each year from 1992 to 1996; 85% of victims were women. In 1989, pediatric research substantiated a striking concurrence of victimization of mothers and their children. In 1994, the Pediatric Family Violence Awareness Project, Massachusetts conducted a pilot evaluation in two urban community health-care centers to determine whether trained providers would increase their rates of screening women for intimate partner violence risk if an on-site referral service for victims was available. The findings indicate that screening rates did not increase, and on-site services for victims of such violence may be insufficient to overcome providers' perceptions that intimate violence is as an overwhelming problem for which they are ill-prepared to intervene. Further research to explore effective and cost-effective interventions in healthcare settings is needed.

 

Information Needs and Uses of the Public Health Workforce Washington, 19971998

The public health workforce has varied informational needs, and a variety of methods for obtaining and utilizing such information.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Patrick O'Carroll, M.D., M.P.H.
CDC, Public Health Practice Program Office
(770) 4882425
To get a better understanding of what kinds of information are needed by various parts of the public health workforce, the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine and the Washington State Department of Health held meetings with different segments of the local public health workforce in Washington during 1997-98. Seven information needs were identified in common by all workforce segments (e.g., better tools for contacting experts, timely updates on legislative issues and events, and "best practice" guidelines), but nearly half of the identified information needs were not shared beyond a single workforce segment. Persons providing information designed to assist state and local public health professionals should take this into account when considering how best to package and disseminate prevention information.

 


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