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MMWR
December 10, 1999

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday.


MMWR Synopsis
  1. Evaluating Newborn Screening Program Data Systems Georgia, 1998
  2. Update: Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity United States, 1998-1999 Season

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Synopsis December 10, 1999

Evaluating Newborn Screening Program Data Systems Georgia, 1998
It is essential that appropriate data be collected to assess the effectiveness of newborn screening which prevents disabilities and/or premature death.

PRESS CONTACT:
Sophia Wang, PhD
CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(770)-488-3235
With recent advances in technology leading to a growing list of possible disorders to screen for in newborns, it is essential that additional data be collected to adequately assess these new tests as well. Public health practitioners should be informed by these data before making policy decisions regarding the addition or deletion of disorders for which to screen. In the Georgia newborn screening program, the limited current data available do not provide enough information to adequately assess the effectiveness of the current screening program in preventing disabilities and/or premature death. The Georgia program is not unlike that of other states. Thorough data could be made available by linking different existing databases throughout Georgia. This linking of various types of information could provide enhanced evaluation of current Newborn Screening (NBS) .

  Update: Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity United States, 1998-1999 Season
Currently, RSV is reaching levels of widespread activity, and should be considered a possible cause of acute respiratory disease in both children and adults.
PRESS CONTACT:
Sara Lowther, MPH
CDC, National Center for Infectious Disease
(404) 639-0431
David Shay, MD, MPH
CDC, National Center for Infectious Disease
(404)639-3972
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of lower respiratory illness among infants and young children worldwide. RSV infection can also result in serious complications in older children and adults, especially those with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease or who are immonocompromised and the elderly. RSV outbreaks occur each year in the United States primarily during winter months, usually from November through May. By November 1999, RSV was reaching levels of widespread activity. Health care providers should consider RSV as a cause of acute respiratory disease in both children and adults.

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