Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us
US Department of Health and Human Services logo and link

Media Relations Links
About Us
Media Contact
Frequently Asked Questions
Media Site Map

CDC News
Press Release Library
Transcripts
MMWR Summaries
B-Roll Footage
Upcoming Events

Related Links
Centers at CDC
Data and Statistics
Health Topics A-Z
Image Library
Publications, Software and Other Products
Global Health Odyssey
Find your state or local health department
HHS News
National Health Observances
Visit the FirstGov Web Site
Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394


MMWR
Synopsis for October 8, 1999

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday.

  1. Primary and Secondary Syphilis United States, 1998
  2. Progress in Reducing Risky Infant Sleeping Positions 13 States, 1996-1997
  3. Update: Influenza Activity Worldwide, May-September 1999
  4. Reasons Reported by Medicare Beneficiaries For Not Receiving Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations United States, 1996
  5. Update: West Nile-Like Viral Encephalitis New York, 1999

MMWR
Synopsis for October 1, 1999

Primary and Secondary Syphilis United States, 1998

Syphilis rates have declined an additional 19 percent in 1998 paving the way toward the nation's goal of elimination.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications
CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895
The national rate of 2.6 cases per 100,000 population, a drop from 3.2 cases in 1997, is the lowest level ever recorded, according to new data released today. The article reports that less than one percent of U.S. counties account for half of reported syphilis cases. Half of all new syphilis cases are concentrated in 28 counties, mainly in the South and selected urban areas in other regions. The data indicate that African-Americans are 34 times more likely to be reported with syphilis than whites with syphilis; 17.1 cases per 100,000 and 0.5 cases per 100,000, respectively. Researchers report that lower infection rates and geographic concentration signal continued progress toward syphilis elimination. To move the nation toward its goal of syphilis elimination, CDC has initiated new efforts targeting the 33 states and cities with either a heavy burden of syphilis or a potential for re-emergence.

Progress in Reducing Risky Infant Sleeping Positions 13 States, 1996-1997

Continued efforts at the national and state levels are needed to educate the public about the recommended safe sleep position for babies.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Mary Lyn Gaffield, Ph.D, M.P.H.
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 488-5325
The American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Back to Sleep Campaign recommend putting babies to sleep on their back or side to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. A survey of mothers in 1997 from 13 states found a nearly threefold difference between the highest and lowest state percentages of babies usually put to sleep on their stomach. For births occurring in 1996 and 1997, stomach positioning decreased across all states (range: 7.4% -35%). Concurrently, the prevalence of back positioning, the safest infant sleeping position, increased in all states and was the most common sleeping position in 7 of the 13 states. Continued support and targeted promotion of the 'back to sleep' campaign to specific population groups are needed to achieve the national goal of reducing the prevalence of stomach sleeping position to no more than 10%

Update: Influenza Activity Worldwide, May-September 1999

Persons at high risk for influenza-related complications should receive a flu shot each fall.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286
Flu shots should be offered each fall to persons at high risk for influenza-related complications and their close contacts, and to health-care providers. The optimal time for organized vaccination campaigns is October through mid-November. Persons at high risk for influenza-related complications include: 1) Persons aged 65 years; 2) Persons who reside in nursing homes or chronic-care facilities; 3) Persons with chronic cardiovascular or pulmonary disorders, including children with asthma; 4) Persons who required medical follow-up or hospitalization during the previous year because of diabetes and other chronic metabolic diseases, renal dysfunction, hemoglobinopathies, or immunosuppression; 5) Children and teenagers who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy (at risk for developing Reye syndrome after flu); and 6) Women who will be in the second or third trimester of pregnancy during the flu season.

Reasons Reported by Medicare Beneficiaries For Not Receiving Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations United States, 1996

Some Medicare beneficiaries did not get flu or pneumococcal shots because they either didn't know that they should, or their health-care provider failed to recommend the shots.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286
This is the first national study to assess reasons why Medicare beneficiaries did not receive vaccinations for flu and pneumonia. Although both flu and pneumococcal vaccinations are available at no-charge to Medicare recipients, approximately half had not received the pneumococcal shot and nearly one-third had not received either shot. Some of the reasons reported for not receiving the shots were lack of knowledge and lack of recommendations from physicians. The survey found that 19.4% of respondents said they did not know they needed a flu shot, while 57.4% said they did not know they needed the pneumonia shot. Because physician recommendations for flu and pneumonia shots are accepted by patients even when they have negative perceptions about vaccinations, health-care providers should include patient education with vaccination recommendations during scheduled appointments.

Update: West Nile-Like Viral Encephalitis New York, 1999

No summary available.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
John Signor
New York State Department of Health
(518) 474-7354
 
Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Office of Communication