Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us


  Press Summaries

MMWR
September 17, 1999

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday.


MMWR Synopsis
  1. High Prevalence of Chlamydial and Gonococcal Infection in Women Entering Jails and Juvenile Detention Centers Chicago, Birmingham, and San Francisco, 1998
  2. Bidi Use Among Urban Youth Massachusetts, March-April 1999
  3. Vaccination Campaign for Kosovar Albanian Refugee Children Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, April-May, 1999

  Click here for MMWR home page.
MMWR

Synopsis September 17, 1999

High Prevalence of Chlamydial and Gonococcal Infection in Women Entering Jails and Juvenile Detention Centers Chicago, Birmingham, and San Francisco, 1998
Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) screening in corrections facilities need to reach at-risk women.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications
CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895
New urine tests are being used to screen women for chlamydia and gonorrhea in jails and juvenile detention centers in Birmingham, Chicago, and San Francisco. Researchers found a high level of gonorrhea and chlamydia at all sites, especially among young women. In the three adult jails, 10%-13% of women screened were positive for chlamydia and 5%-9% were positive for gonorrhea. In the three juvenile facilities, 16%-27% were positive for chlamydia and 6%-17% were positive for gonorrhea. Although STDs are extremely common among women entering jails, the majority of corrections facilities do not routinely screen for these infections, unless a woman has symptoms or requests testing. However, chlamydia and gonorrhea frequently have no symptoms. If left untreated, these diseases can have serious health consequences and can continue to spread to others.

  Bidi Use Among Urban Youth Massachusetts, March-April 1999
Study shows that bidis (also known as beedis or beedies) are popular among Massachusetts' urban youth.
PRESS CONTACT:
Howard Koh, M.D., M.P.H
Massachusetts Department of Public Health
(617) 624-5006
or
Michael Eriksen, Sc.D.
CDC, Office on Smoking and Health
(770) 488-5493
A study conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and CDC found that of the 642 Massachusetts urban youth surveyed, 40 percent reported smoking bidis in their lifetime, 16 percent reported smoking bidis at least once in the past 30 days, and 8 percent smoked a 100 or more bidis in their lifetime. Bidis are small brown cigarettes, often flavored, consisting of tobacco hand-rolled in tendu or temburni leaf and secured with a string at one end. They are primarily produced in India and in some Southeast Asian countries, and are available in the United States. Research shows that bidis are a significant health hazard to users. One study found that bidis produce more than three times the amount of carbon monoxide and nicotine and more than five times the amount of tar than cigarette smoke, when tested on a standard smoking machine.

  Vaccination Campaign for Kosovar Albanian Refugee Children Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, April-May, 1999
Immunization against measles is primary concern during the initial phase of any complex emergency involving a large population of displaced persons.
PRESS CONTACT:
Kay Tomashek, M.D., M.P.H.
CDC, Epidemiology Program Office
(404) 657-2635
Because of the extensive ethnic conflict, approximately 500,000 Kosovar Albanians fled their homes in early 1999. Of the estimated 130,000 who entered the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, 65,000 were housed in seven refugee camps. In past emergencies, up to 50% of deaths were attributed to measles; therefore, immunization against measles was a priority for relief personnel in Macedonia. In addition to measles, WHO recommends immunization against other vaccine-preventable diseases such as polio. The standard recommendation for vaccinating displaced populations, in this situation, differed from recommended protocols. At the request of the Macedonian Ministry of Health, more antigens were included and fewer children were targeted for immunization. Specific situations may make it feasible to modify recommended protocols, but any adaptations must not hinder measles vaccination efforts.

Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention