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Pregnant Women

What We Know

How to Protect Yourself

CDC recommends special precautions for pregnant women.

Do Not Travel to an Area with Risk of Zika

  • All areas with risk of Zika (i.e., with documented or likely Zika virus transmission) have this travel recommendation: pregnant women should not travel to these areas.

What to Do If You Live In or Travel to an Area with Risk of Zika

If you live in or must travel to one of these areas, talk to your doctor or other healthcare provider first and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites and practice safe sex.

During travel or while living in an area with risk of Zika

After travel

  • Talk to a doctor or other healthcare provider after travel to an area with risk of Zika.
  • If you develop a fever with a rash, joint pain, or red eyes, talk to your doctor immediately and tell him or her about your travel.
  • Take steps to prevent mosquito bites for 3 weeks after returning.
  • Take steps to prevent passing Zika through sex by using condoms from start to finish every time you have sex (oral, vaginal, or anal) or by not having sex.

Zika Testing for Pregnant Women

If you… When to talk with your doctor When to be tested
Traveled to areas with risk of Zika that have a CDC Zika travel notice Talk to a doctor or other healthcare provider after travel even if you don’t feel sick.   You should be tested for Zika when you return from travel. CDC recommends testing for pregnant women with and without Zika symptoms.
Traveled to areas with risk of Zika but no CDC Zika travel notice Talk to a doctor or other healthcare provider after travel even if you don’t feel sick.  

You should be tested if you develop symptoms of Zika or if your fetus has abnormalities on an ultrasound that might be related to Zika infection. Because the level of risk of Zika is unknown in areas with Zika risk but no Zika travel notice, routine testing is not recommended for pregnant women who have traveled to those areas and who do not have symptoms. However, your doctor may offer testing based on your individual situation.  

Live in an area with risk of Zika that has a CDC Zika travel notice Talk to a doctor or other healthcare provider throughout your pregnancy.

You may be at risk of getting Zika throughout your pregnancy. For this reason, doctors or other healthcare providers should offer testing

  • At the first prenatal care visit and
  • A second test in the second trimester.

If you have symptoms of Zika at any time during your pregnancy, you should be tested for Zika.

Related Fact Sheets

Protect Yourself


Travel to an Area with Zika

Doctor’s Visit Checklist: For Pregnant Women Who Traveled to an Area with Zika

Zika and Sex: Information for men who have pregnant partners and live in or recently traveled to areas with Zika

Zika Virus Testing for Any Pregnant Woman Not Living in an Area With Zika


Live in an Area with Zika

Zika and Sex: Information for pregnant women living in areas with Zika

Zika Virus Testing for Pregnant Women Living in an Area with Zika


Positive Zika Virus Test

For Pregnant Women: A Positive Zika Virus Test: What does it mean for me?

US Zika Pregnancy Registry: What Pregnant Women Need to Know

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