Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Advice for people living in or traveling to South Florida

Areas in Miami, FL where Zika virus is being spread by mosquitoes

Miami-Dade County, FL. Red shows areas where pregnant women should not travel. Yellow shows areas where pregnant women should consider postponing travel.

Area in Miami, FL where Zika virus is being spread by mosquitoes

Miami-Dade County, FL. Red shows areas where pregnant women should not travel. Yellow shows areas where pregnant women should consider postponing travel.

CDC has issued guidance for people living in or traveling to Miami-Dade County, Florida. CDC designates areas for Zika virus transmission prevention in the continental United States and Hawaii as red or yellow. Miami-Dade County is designated as a Zika cautionary (yellow) area. See CDC’s travel, testing, and pregnancy planning guidance for areas with reported mosquito-borne spread of Zika virus.

Travel

  • Pregnant women should consider postponing travel to Miami-Dade County.

Prevention

  • Women and men who live in or travel to Miami-Dade County should remain aware of active Zika virus transmission and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites.
  • Pregnant women and their partners who live in or travel to Miami-Dade County should consistently and correctly use condoms every time they have sex (including vaginal, anal, and oral sex) to prevent Zika virus infection, or they should not have sex during the pregnancy. For more information, see CDC’s travel, testing, and pregnancy planning guidance for areas with reported mosquito-borne spread of Zika virus.

Testing and Diagnosis

  • Pregnant women who lived in, traveled to, or had sex without a condom with someone who lived in or traveled to Miami-Dade County after August 1, 2016, should be tested for Zika virus

Pregnancy Planning

  • People living in Miami-Dade County should talk to their healthcare provider about pregnancy plans.
  • Given the limited data available about the persistence of Zika in body fluids and the chances of harm to a pregnancy when the woman is infected with Zika around the time of conception, some couples with a partner with possible Zika virus exposure may choose to wait longer or shorter than the recommended period to try to get pregnant. For more information, see CDC’s travel, testing, and pregnancy planning guidance for areas with reported mosquito-borne spread of Zika virus.

Guidance for previous Zika active transmission areas (Red areas)

The guidance for yellow areas now applies to the identified areas in Wynwood, North Miami Beach, South Miami Beach, and Little River, FL, where the risk of Zika remains but is no longer greater than that in the rest of Miami-Dade County.Women and men living in or who traveled to these areas should be aware that these locations were considered to have intense Zika virus spread previously, but low risk of local spread may still exist. Partners of pregnant women in these areas should use condoms consistently and correctly to prevent passing Zika during sex, or they should not have sex during the pregnancy.

  • Pregnant women who lived in, traveled to, or had sex without a condom with a person who lived in or traveled to the identified area of Little River after August 1, 2016, should be tested for Zika.
  • Women who traveled to the identified area of Little River after August 1, 2016, regardless of whether they had symptoms, should wait at least 8 weeks before trying to get pregnant.
  • Men who traveled to the Little River area after August 1, 2016, regardless of whether they had symptoms, should wait at least 6 months before trying to get their partner pregnant.
  • Pregnant women who lived in, traveled to, or had sex without a condom with a person who lived in or traveled to the identified areas of North Miami Beach or South Miami Beach after July 14, 2016, should be tested for Zika.
  • Women who traveled to the identified areas of North Miami Beach or South Miami Beach after July 14, 2016, regardless of whether they had symptoms, should wait at least 8 weeks before trying to get pregnant.
  • Men who traveled to the identified areas of North Miami Beach or South Miami Beach after July 14, 2016, regardless of whether they had symptoms, should wait at least 6 months before trying to get their partner pregnant.
  • Pregnant women who lived in, traveled to, or had sex without a condom with a person who lived in or traveled to the Wynwood area after June 15, 2016, should be tested for Zika.
  • Women who traveled to the Wynwood area after June 15, 2016, regardless of whether they had symptoms, should wait at least 8 weeks before trying to get pregnant.
  • Men who traveled to the Wynwood area after June 15, 2016, regardless of whether they had symptoms, should wait at least 6 months before trying to get their partner pregnant.
  • Given the limited data available about the persistence of Zika virus in body fluids and the chances of harm to a pregnancy when the woman is infected with Zika around the time of conception some couples with a partner with possible Zika virus exposure may choose to wait longer or shorter than the recommended period.

Timeline

On December 9, 2016, CDC removed the red area designation for the remaining 1.5-square-mile area of South Miami Beach after three mosquito incubation periods (45 days) passed without any new locally transmitted cases of Zika. Guidance for yellow areas now applies to the South Miami Beach area and all of Miami-Dade County.

On December 2, 2016, CDC removed the red area designation for the 1-square-mile area of Little River after more than three mosquito incubation periods (45 days) passed without any new locally transmitted cases of Zika. Guidance for yellow areas now applies to the Little River area.

On November 21, 2016, CDC updated guidance for the 4.5-square-mile area of Miami Beach. The North and South Miami Beach sections are being considered separately again because no new cases of local Zika virus transmission were identified in the North Miami Beach area after three mosquito incubation periods passed (45 days), suggesting that the risk of Zika virus infection in North Miami Beach is no longer greater than in the rest of Miami-Dade County. The original 1.5-square-mile area of South Miami Beach for which guidance was issued on September 17 will remain a red area until 45 days pass without new cases. The remainder of Miami-Dade County is designated as a Zika cautionary area (yellow area). Guidance for yellow areas now applies to North Miami Beach.

On October 19, because local spread of Zika virus continued to be reported in Miami-Dade County, CDC updated its travel and testing guidance to apply recommendations to all of Miami-Dade County.

On October 13, Florida announced a new area of mosquito-borne spread of Zika in an additional 1-square-mile area of Little River in Miami-Dade County, FL.

On September 19, CDC updated guidance for the Wynwood-designated area after three mosquito incubation periods passed without any new locally transmitted cases of Zika.

On August 19, CDC also issued guidance for a 1.5-square-mile section of South Miami Beach identified to have mosquito-borne spread of Zika; on September 17, this section was expanded to a 4.5-square-mile area that included areas of North Miami Beach.

On August 1, 2016, CDC issued guidance for people living in or traveling to a 1-square-mile area of the Wynwood neighborhood in Miami, FL, identified by the Florida Department of Health as having mosquito-borne spread of Zika.

For questions on mosquito control in Florida

Florida health officials can answer specific questions on their mosquito control program. Aerial treatment of areas with products that rapidly reduce both young and adult mosquitoes can help to limit the number of mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus. Repeated aerial applications of insecticide has reduced mosquito populations as a part of an integrated mosquito management program.

Top