Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Zika Virus

Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies

Left Graphic: This graphic is a drawing of a baby with birth defects caused by congenital Zika syndrome. Right Graphic: This graphic shows that the number of reported cases of pregnant women with any evidence of possible Zika increased in 2016 from January through December

 

 

Congenital Zika syndrome is a pattern of birth defects in babies infected with Zika during pregnancy.

  • Small head size (microcephaly), problems with vision and hearing, problems moving limbs and body, damage to the brain, seizures, and problems with feeding (difficulty swallowing) are the birth defects related to congenital Zika syndrome

Reported cases of pregnant women with any lab evidence of possible Zika increased in 2016.

Week Month Total number of pregnancies with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection reported from 50 states and DC
1 January 2016 0
2 January 0
3 January 0
4 January 0
5 February 0
6 February 0
7 February 9
8 February 9
9 March 9
10 March 9
11 March 11
12 March 11
13 March 11
14 April 73
15 April 92
16 April 113
17 April 132
18 May 134
19 May 135
20 May 153
21 May 187
22 June 222
23 June 244
24 June 271
25 June 290
26 June 326
27 July 346
28 July 400
29 July 430
30 July 478
31 August 507
32 August 527
33 August 579
34 August 630
35 September 711
36 September 731
37 September 768
38 September 803
39 September 835
40 October 879
41 October 907
42 October 967
43 October 1012
44 November 1057
45 November 1088
46 November 1124
47 November 1154
48 December 1182
49 December 1229
50 December 1253
51 December 1285
52 December 1297

 

SOURCE: Vital Signs Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, April 4, 2017.


Graphic: This graphic shows four tabs of steps to prevent and manage Zika: Prevent, Screen, Test and Manage

 

 

Zika can be prevented and managed with proper care.

Prevent

  • Avoid travel to areas with Zika.
  • Talk with your doctor about the risks if you must travel to any areas with Zika.
  • Take steps to prevent getting Zika from sex.
  • Follow steps to prevent mosquito bites.

Screen

  • Screen pregnant women for possible exposure to Zika:
    • Have you traveled to an area with Zika during pregnancy or just before you became pregnant?
    • Have you had sex without a condom with a partner who lives in or traveled to an area with Zika?
    • Do you live in or do you frequently travel (daily or weekly) to an area with Zika?

Test

Who should be tested for Zika?

Pregnant women

  • Who were exposed to Zika through travel or unprotected sex whether or not they report signs or symptoms
  • Living in areas with Zika

Babies

  • Born to mothers with evidence of Zika infection during pregnancy
  • Born to mothers who were possibly exposed to Zika
    • With clinical findings that suggest congenital Zika syndrome regardless of mother’s test results
    • Without abnormalities whose mothers were not tested in the appropriate time frame if there is concern about follow-up for the baby

Manage

If a baby is suspected to have Zika, clinical management should include:

  • Comprehensive physical exam
  • Neurologic exam
  • Eye exam
  • Brain imaging
  • Newborn hearing screening
  • Zika laboratory tests
  • Referral to specialists as needed

SOURCES: Vital Signs Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, July 29, 2016 and August 26, 2016.

TOP
Error processing SSI file