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Opioid Overdoses Treated in Emergency Departments

Identify opportunities for action

Graphic: Opioid overdoses continued to increase in cities and towns of all types.

 

Opioid overdoses continued to increase in cities and towns of all types.*

* From left to right, the categories are:

  • Non-core (non-metro): 21 percent increase
  • Micropolitan (non-metro): 24 percent increase
  • Small netro: 37 percent increase
  • Medium metro: 43 percent increase
  • Large fringe metro: 21 percent increase
  • Large central metro: 54 percent increase – Large and steady increase for large cities

SOURCE: CDC’s Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) Program, 16 states reporting percent changes from July 2016 through September 2017.


Graphic: Detecting recent trends in opioid overdose ED visits provides opportunities for action in this fast-moving epidemic.

 

Detecting recent trends in opioid overdose ED visits provides opportunities for action in this fast-moving epidemic.
State Percentage Change
Alabama Data unavailable
Alaska Data unavailable
Arizona Data unavailable
Arkansas Data unavailable
California Data unavailable
Colorado Data unavailable
Connecticut Data unavailable
Delaware Increase 50% or more
District of Columbia Data unavailable
Florida Data unavailable
Georgia Data unavailable
Hawaii Data unavailable
Idaho Data unavailable
Illinois Increase 50% or more
Indiana Increase 25 to 49%
Iowa Data unavailable
Kansas Data unavailable
Kentucky Decrease
Louisiana Data unavailable
Maine Increase 25 to 49%
Maryland Data unavailable
Massachusetts Decrease
Michigan Data unavailable
Minnesota Data unavailable
Mississippi Data unavailable
Missouri Increase 1 to 24%
Montana Data unavailable
Nebraska Data unavailable
Nevada Increase 1 to 24%
New Hampshire Decrease
New Jersey Data unavailable
New Mexico Increase 1 to 24%
New York Data unavailable
North Carolina Increase 25 to 49%
North Dakota Data unavailable
Ohio Increase 25 to 49%
Oklahoma Data unavailable
Oregon Data unavailable
Pennsylvania Increase 50% or more
Rhode Island Decrease
South Carolina Data unavailable
South Dakota Data unavailable
Tennessee Data unavailable
Texas Data unavailable
Utah Data unavailable
Vermont Data unavailable
Virginia Data unavailable
Washington Data unavailable
West Virginia Decrease
Wisconsin Increase 50% or more
Wyoming Data unavailable

 

SOURCE: CDC’s Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) Program, 16 states reporting percent changes from July 2016 through September 2017.

A rise in opioid overdoses is detected. What now?

A rise in opioid overdoses is detected. What now?

Naloxone is a drug that can reverse the effects of opioid overdose and can be life-saving if administered in time.

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD) can aid in preventing repeat overdoses. MAT combines the use of medication (methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone) with counseling and behavioral therapies.

Coordinated, informed efforts can better prevent opioid overdoses and deaths

Local Emergency Department

  • Offer naloxone and training to patient’s family and friends, in case the patient has another overdose.
  • Connect patients with hospital case managers or peer navigators to link them to follow-up treatment and services.
  • Plan for the increasing number of patients with opioid-related conditions, including overdose, injection-related concerns, and withdrawal.

First Responders | Public Safety | Law Enforcement Officers

  • Get adequate supply and training for naloxone administration.
  • Identify changes in illicit drug supply and work with state and local health departments to respond effectively.
  • Collaborate with public health departments and health systems to enhance linkage to treatment and services.

Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment Providers

  • Increase treatment services, including MAT for OUD.
  • Increase and coordinate mental health services for conditions that often occur with OUD.

Community Members

  • Connect with organizations in the community that provide public health services, treatment, counseling, and naloxone distribution.

Community-Based Organizations

  • Assist in mobilizing a community response to those most at risk.
  • Provide resources to reduce harms that can occur when injecting drugs, including ones that offer screening for HIV and hepatitis B and C, in combination with referral to treatment and naloxone provision.

Local Health Departments

  • Alert the community to the rapid increase in opioid overdoses seen in emergency departments and inform strategic plans and timely responses.
  • Ensure an adequate naloxone supply.
  • Increase availability and access to necessary services.
  • Coordinate with key community groups to detect and respond to any changes in illicit drug use.
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